What if we could control what we hear?

Nuheara, a tech startup, has developed “innovative augmented ‘Hearables’ (ear buds) that allow people to control their hearing experience with the help of a smartphone app.

Sounds like disruptive technology, no?  But Nuheara is not alone.  Doppler Labs had a very sucessful Kickstart campaign last month featuring their app controlled earbuds, raising 253% of their goal.

The interest in this technology shows that many people would like to control what they can (and cannot) hear.  Good.  But it’s unclear whether Nuheara’s Hearables or  Doppler Labs’ Here Active Listening System will limit the sound output delivered directly into users’ ears.  I routinely see people on the subway wearing earbuds where the residual sound leaking from their earbuds is so loud that I can hear what they are listening to.  If I can hear it, they must be destroying their hearing.  Not today, of course, but years from now when it will be too late to stop the damage.  The delayed damage, coupled with the knowledge that the EPA determined over 40 years ago that a 24-hour exposure level of 70 decibels as the level of environmental noise which will prevent any measurable hearing loss over a lifetime,  makes government’s and industry’s failure to limit decibel levels on headphones and earbuds insidious.

I look forward to the reviews of Hearables and Here Active LIstening System.  Having a relatively mild case of hyperacusis, a common trigger of discomfort for me is the competing layers of noise in restaurants.  If the earbuds work as advertised and actively suppress background noise, I may be able to enjoy the conversation at my table without the discomfort caused by the cacophony around me.  That would be nirvana.

Ultimately, I hope that the release of this technology helps to fuel a discussion about noise pollution, in general, as well as the effect of headphones and earbuds on ear health.

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