Yet another reason restaurants should lower the volume:

Noisy restaurants could be skewering your taste buds, experts say. Liz Biro, The Indianapolis Star, examines the modern American restaurants’ love affair with noise and the unintended consequence noisier restaurants have on our taste buds.  Biro cites Oxford University experimental psychology professor Charles Spence, author of Noise and Its Impact on the Perception of Food and Drink, who wrote that, “[a] growing body of laboratory-based research now demonstrates that loud background noise can affect the ability to taste food.”  Loud music also “hinders our ability to perceive how much alcohol is in a cocktail,” writes Biro, adding that it causes us to chew faster and drink more, two factors that no doubt are somewhat responsible for the increased noise levels in restaurants.

Biro states that “[c]omplaints about noisy restaurants started rising about a decade ago” when tablecloths, carpeting, and softer music gave way to blaring music and the hard, reflective surfaces favored by restauranteurs seeking an “urban industrial” vibe. She adds that New York City’s Babbo, owned by Mario Batali, set the pace, as the pasta “is served to a hard rock soundtrack like the one chefs prefer in the kitchen.”  While faster chewing turns tables over more quickly, and increased drinking adds to the bottom line, there is another reason restaurants are loud.  Namely, a loud, boisterous spot is seen “lively” and “high energy,” and restauranteurs believe that loud volume  attracts millennials.

But restauranteurs recognize that some places have gotten too loud and they can’t ignore that noise was the number one complaint in the 2014 Zagat’s Dining Trends Survey.  Biro states that restaurants in Indianapolis are listening and taking some measures to reign in noise, but adds that one restaurateur, referring to his two “concepts,” notes that they are “intentionally more lively and a little louder than a normal place would be, although we generally try to make sure it’s not so loud that it interferes with spirited conversation.”

Long and short, until a successful restauranteur in New York City or some other trendsetting place addresses noise in a serious way, restauranteurs nationwide will continue to follow this disturbing trend.  While we wait for reason and taste to prevail, residents and visitors to New York City can go to our sister site, Quiet City Maps, to find restaurants, coffee shops, bars, and other public spaces where you can enjoy a nosh or a drink and have a conversation without screaming.

Thanks to @QuietEdinburgh for the link.

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