If life is fair, the person responsible for the first open plan office

will spend eternity in his or her own special ring in hell. Whatever the initial motivation for the open floor plan–we recall it was to encourage “collaboration,” which must have been the word du jour at the time–many who followed this “innovation” only did so to reap cost savings. That open floor plans are and were unpopular with the worker bees was dismissed without serious consideration as finance departments and underperforming CEOs gleefully counted pennies (that would soon find their way to their bonus checks).

Sadly, this short-sighted and short-term attempt to shore up shaky financial reports is causing some very real problems.  As Amy X. Wang, Quartz, notes, “[s]tudies have found that lack of sound privacy is the biggest drain on employee morale, and that workers lose as much as 86 minutes a day to distractions.”  In fact, in the last year a flurry of articles have come out that acknowledge the very real costs of open plan offices.  So what will our corporate overlords do?  Will they call in the designers and reconfigure the office space?  Don’t hold your breath.  They will more likely send Wang’s article, “The complete guide to noise-canceling in open offices and other hectic spaces,” to the underlings and go back to surfing the web looking for their next unnecessary purchase.

As for Wang’s advice?  The usual: invest in a pair of noise-cancelling headphones, download white noise apps, get a plant, go for a walk.  Saved you a click.

Link via Quiet Revolution: @livequiet.

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