Feeling a bit stressed? Maybe this will help.

It’s true: The sound of nature helps us relax.  Researchers at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) have “found that playing ‘natural sounds’ affected the bodily systems that control the flight-or-fright and rest-digest autonomic nervous systems, with associated effects in the resting activity of the brain.” Science Daily reports that “[w]hile naturalistic sounds and ‘green’ environments have frequently been linked with promoting relaxation and wellbeing, until now there has been no scientific consensus as to how these effects come about.”

The researchers “conducted an experiment where participants listened to sounds recorded from natural and artificial environments,” during which their brain activity was measured and autonomic nervous system activity was monitored. The research team found that activity in the “default mode network of the brain (a collection of areas which are active when we are resting) was different depending on the sounds playing in the background.” Long and short, when listening to natural sounds “the brain connectivity reflected an outward-directed focus of attention,” whereas artificial sounds caused the brain connectivity to reflect “an inward-directed focus of attention, similar to states observed in anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.”  Interestingly, the change in brain activity depended on the participant’s stress level–those showing the greatest stress before the experiment “showed the greatest bodily relaxation when listening to natural sounds,” but those who were already relaxed showed “a slight increase in stress” when “listening to natural compared with artificial sounds.”

While helpful for treating people with anxiety, the study results will have a much greater reach. Science Daily notes that “the study of environmental exposure effects is of growing interest in physical and mental health settings, and greatly influences issues of public health and town planning.” Could a restful natural spot will be coming to your town?

Link via UK Noise Association.

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