Is it too late to save the orcas?

Wanyee Li, Toronto Metro, reports that researchers are concerned about the state of the health of the 78 remaining orcas of the Salish Sea orca population.  “The killer whales are declining for a variety of reasons ranging from infection, starvation, and conflict with large ships, both head-on and from the noise pollution they emit.”  Researchers say they know what to do to save these animals, but the problem is finding the political will to do it.

Kim Dun, an oceans specialist with  World Wildlife Fund Canada, said that “noise pollution is among the biggest threats to the whales,” because a “noisy environment that makes it harder for the whales to do what they need to do to survive.”  The combination of threats is enough “to choke the iconic animals until there are not enough whales to keep the population alive.”

In related news, recordings show that baby humpback whales and their mothers “whisper” just in case killer whales are nearby.  Ecologists studying the humpbacks say that this determination highlights the need to regulate ocean noise, because the discovery “suggests that human-produced machinery sounds could be particularly harmful to calves and their mothers.”

 

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