This is not surprising at all:

Photo credit: Waldo Jaquith licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Super-fast hand dryers in public toilets are ‘as loud as pneumatic drills.’ According to the European Cleaning Journal (yes, it exists), “[m]odern jet air hand dryers have the same impact on our ears as a close-range pneumatic drill.” We at Silencity can’t stand them. Why? Because high-speed hand dryers are abruptly and horribly loud, and then they are placed in rooms with tiled and mirrored surfaces and, often, metal stall dividers and doors. That is, super-fast hand dryers are pneumatic drills fitted into a small live box.

But the problem with the sudden loud noise they create is not just a matter of a temporary discomfort. According to Jonathan Ratcliffe from Audiologist.co.uk, powerful hand drying machines can cause lasting damage to the elderly, those with hearing problems, and children. Why children?  Because “the machines are typically positioned at the same height as their head which means they are getting it full blast,” says Ratcliffe.

We have often seen hand dryers accompanied by a sign suggesting that its use is ecologically sound. And while it is noble to save trees from becoming paper towels, these so-called ecological devices may be worse in the balance if we add in the cost of permanent hearing damage. Perhaps we can have the best of both worlds, however, if manufacturers turn to tackling the most obvious side-effect of these high-speed models and put real resources into developing quieter machines.  Now that would be an ecologically sound investment.

Link via @QuietEdinburgh.

 

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *