Monthly Archive: November 2017

Good news for New Yorkers who love to dance

But potentially bad news for bar neigbors: After 91 Years, New York Will Let Its People Boogie.  Annie Correal, The New York Times, writes about the repeal of the law that banned dancing in New York City bars. While this repeal is great news for bar owners and patrons with happy feet, it may not be embraced by near by residents looking for a good night’s sleep. So what should a bar owner do to let her customers dance the night away without disturbing the peace?

The City’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has the answer. DEP has produced a video that should help bar owners learn how to mitigate noise levels before they roll out the dance floor:

And the DEP helpfully has provided a list of noise control products and services available for all nightlige business owners.

Now let’s hope bar owners show some restraint–or spend some dough on sound insulation–in their rush to create a dance floor. If not, one hopes the next city council bill will be to give the DEP funding to hire more noise inspectors.

How a tsunami revealed human noise pollution

 

Photo credit: Calbear22, photo released into the public domain

Phys.org reports how a tsunami that struck Hawaii in 2011–caused by the same earthquake that hit Japan and created the tsunami that triggered the Fukushima nuclear disaster–caused a temporary halt to boat traffic that allowed scientists “a rare glimpse into what the bays might sound like without human activities.” By luck, the tsunami hit while “a Duke University-lead team was recording underwater sound in four bays” on Hawaii’s Kona coat.

It turns out that oceans are pretty loud. On the day of the tsunami, the loudest part of the day reached 98.8 decibels. Why are oceans so loud? “Because sound waves travel and are amplified differently in water than in air.” But 98.8 decibels was quiet compared to a reading on a typical day, as noise from boat traffic can reach up to 125 decibels, and the sound from nearby sonar exercises tops 143 decibels.

So what did the Duke study conclude? It showed that humans created the loudest disruptions and boat traffic and sonar were “significant causes of noise in all four bays.” Human-made noise has long been a concern of conservationists who fear that “interactions caused by dolphin-encounter boat tours and other human activities” are disrupting dolphins’ sleeping behaviors and potentially interfering with their hunt for food, since dolphins rest in the bays during the day to ready themselves for the hunt at night.

The first one bites the dust

No longer with us

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Some observers see great potential in a new category of electronic device called hearables, something a little less than a personal sound amplification device, or PSAP, and certainly less than a hearing aid, but designed to help adults understand conversation in noisy places.

Others of us–and I am in this latter category–don’t see much of a future for these products, which are unlikely to work well and unlikely to be attractive to consumers. After all, who wants to be the only one in the room wearing some silly-looking device?

There are several vendors trying to bring these to market but today we learned that the first one of these, Doppler Labs, bit the dust after burning through $51 million of venture capital.

Its product, Here One, only had a two-hour battery life.

One wishes the $51 million had been spent dealing with the root cause of the problem, making restaurants quieter. That’s what’s really needed to help people with hearing loss.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

How to help pets stressed by fireworks

Yesterday was Bonfire Night in the UK, a time spent with friends and family, lighting bonfires and enjoying fireworks displays. As in the U.S., people look forward to the parties and displays, but they worry about how the noise makes their pets anxious and fearful. Here’s a useful piece from The Warrington Guardian that looks at how pet owners can protect their stressed out pets.

And for more difficult cases, there’s a medicinal treatment to help man’s best friend.

Or we could enjoy the display without the noise and opt for quiet fireworks.  Yes, it’s an option.

Being able to hear the music

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

My father used to say that people don’t know how important some things are until we don’t have them. He wasn’t talking about physical things, but about health, love, and security. Well, money and food, too.

The same is true of music. Those of use born with normal hearing don’t appreciate how wonderful it is to enjoy music, whatever type of music we like to listen to.

But for someone born with profound hearing loss, cochlear implants offered her the opportunity to hear music for the first time.

After seven years, she wrote this wonderful essay, which we want to share with you.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Clever hacks for dealing with noise

in your home. Louise Smithers, D’Marge, writes about various tricks and design choices you can employ to keep noise to a minimum in your castle.  While some options are obvious–use rugs and say yes to drapes–others are a bit more novel, like using attractive fabric covered acoustic panels to add visual interest and noise reduction to your space. While no one suggestion will likely solve every situation, Smithers’ list is a good place to start.

Click the link above to read for the full list of options.

A lament about hearing aids

Jennifer Finney Boylan, The New York Times, wonders: “Glasses Are Cool. Why Aren’t Hearing Aids?

I can answer that for you Jennifer:

Hearing loss is stigmatized and hearing aids are expensive, rarely covered by insurance, and don’t work as well for hearing as glasses work for sight.

In short, there is nothing at all cool about an expensive bit of kit that doesn’t work that well and is assumed to be a device meant only for the elderly.

You’re welcome.

The health impact of environmental noise

by Jan L. Mayes, MSc, Aud(C), RAud, Audiologist

Environmental noise is damaging and inflicts unwanted sounds into everyday life. In 1984, Gordon Hempton, The Sound Tracker, found 20 natural locations in Washington State with noise-free intervals lasting over 15 minutes. No manmade noise at all. No planes, trains, or traffic. By 1995, only three locations were noise-free. When I employed current sound tracking in my suburban neighbourhood in the Pacific Northwest, I never had noise-free intervals last more than 4 minutes.  And I tried tracking at different times of the day, every day of the week for months.

Sociocusis is high distortion hearing loss caused by loud personal environmental noise (i.e., 75 dB average or higher). The louder the noise, the faster the damage. Noise-induced hidden hearing loss starts first. It begins with permanent rips in hearing nerves for which there are no symptoms, but damage is progressive for months after noise ends. More unprotected noise exposures causes yet more nerve damage leading to temporary or permanent inner ear hearing loss and what I call “hyper ears” (tinnitus and hyperacusis). Presbycusis, or age-related hearing loss, comes from gradual inner ear changes over time. Sociocusis, wrongly called early presbycusis, has a much greater impact on communication and music enjoyment than presbycusis alone.

There are also physical and mental health hazards from chronic environmental noise (i.e., 55 dB – 75 dB average). Health effects include stress, insomnia, learning problems in children, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attacks, strokes, dementia, and shorter life. Blood pressure goes up with every 10 dB increase in environmental noise.

Ear protection prevents sociocusis from loud activities like nightclubs, concerts, and stadium events. Imagine if these venues were designated “Noise Hazard Zones”: no ear protection, no entry. Imagine Noise Free Zones like at Comic-Con 2017 in New York City. Imagine architects designing public spaces with quiet acoustics in the first place. Imagine if it was standard for manufacturers to make quiet products, dropping the noise hazard of everything from blenders, lawnmowers, planes, trains, and traffic.

The UK estimates noise pollution related healthcare costs at £1.09 billion annually. The EU is using urban planning and government polices to prevent environmental noise. Noise mitigation strategies include quiet asphalt, low-noise tires, traffic curfews, quieter airplanes, noise-optimized airport take-off and approach procedures, and better infrastructure planning.

But in the U.S., the FAA denies the crippling public health burden of noise pollution, and Congress hasn’t passed the Quiet Communities Act of 2016 or 2017.

Nobel Prize Winner Robert Koch predicted in 1910 that “[o]ne day man will have to fight noise as fiercely as cholera and pest.” I think the day is here.

Jan L. Mayes is an international Eric Hoffer Award winning author in Non-Fiction Health. She is also a blogger and audiologist specializing in noise, tinnitus-hyperacusis, and hearing health education. You can read more of Jan’s work at her site, www.janlmayes.com.

Another reason to avoid fast food and chain restaurants

Photo credit: Mike Mozart licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

My wife and I don’t eat in restaurants much anymore–the vast majority are just too noisy to enjoy both the meal and the conversation–and we don’t patronize fast food or chain restaurants. Burgers and fries and sodas are just not healthy food, and I try to stay healthy.

But for those who do, according to Culture Cheat Sheet noise is a major problem, joining a list of complaints that includes dirty spaces, bad service, and bad food. Culture Cheat Sheet cobbled together survey results from Consumer Reports, the American Customer Satisfaction Index, and Temkin Experience Ratings to come up with their report on the most hated restaurant and fast food chains.

Most fast food and chain restaurants use a formula of tasty but unhealthy food with too much fat, too much sugar, too much salt, and too many calories at a relatively low price to lure customers.

Research shows a clear correlation between the density of fast food restaurants in neighborhoods–largely poor neighborhoods populated by African-American and Hispanic people–and obesity. The epidemic of obesity in the U.S. is related to changes in eating patterns–fast food, sugary sodas, bigger portions–and decreased exercise.

But now it appears that these restaurants also serve up a side order of hearing loss with their food. Because noise is causing an epidemic of noise-induced hearing loss, too.

And that’s another reason to avoid these restaurants.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.