Monthly Archive: February 2018

Pooping, noisy crows vex Trenton, New Jersey

Apparently 30,000 loud, pooping crows are annoying Trenton residents who are tired of the crows waking them up and pooping everywhere. So what is the city going to do to get them to leave? According to NBC New York, the city is turning to “high tech” to get rid of them.  Specifically, the city deploying “pyrotechnics, lasers, spotlights, amplified recordings of crow distress calls and crow effigies” to convince their unwanted guests to leave. Desperate times call for desperate measures.

 

The only instance where having noisy neighbors is a good thing

Photo credit: Anker A and Grave S licensed under CC BY 3.0

Noisy shrimp may be helping gray whales find their prey.  Jes Burns, OPB.org, writes about snapping shrimp, a variety of shrimp researchers at Oregon State University have heard, but not seen. How do these shrimp make so much sound?  Burns writes:

There’s a popping static created by thousands of shrimp claws pushing out jets of water at extremely high speed. The speed and disturbance create a tiny bubble that immediately collapses, creating a noise so loud and strong it can to stun prey a few inches away.

The researchers noticed that “the rocky areas where the shrimp live are also home to swarms of tiny zooplankton that whales love,” which made them wonder whether the whales use the shrimp as a tool to find food since they use sound to find prey. More study will be done to determine whether the hypothesis is correct.

And if, in the interim, you want to hear was thousands of snapping shrimp sound like, click below:

Listen to “What Snapping Shrimp Sound Like” on Spreaker.

A wave of hearing loss in young people is being predicted

and the cause of this epidemic, says Teresa Cowie, Radio New Zealand, is damaging levels of sound from personal audio devices and noisy venues, like nightclubs. Will it really be an epidemic? Cowie cites the World Health Organization, which puts the number of at risk teenagers and young adults at more than a billion. Who are these at-risk young people? Mostly 12-to-35 years olds in well off countries who listen to unsafe levels of sound on their personal audio devices and smart phones.

So how does the WHO and other health organizations know that an epidemic is on the way? Cowie interviewed Peter Thorne, an audiology professor at Auckland University, who said “[t]here are some studies where younger people coming into the workforce, areas where they might take audiograms or do hearing tests – like the military for example – and those studies have shown a proportion of youth coming in with hearing losses.”

Thorne notes that the rules for limits on sound volume are voluntary for the manufacturers of personal audio devices, but the WHO is “currently review regulations around the volume levels devices should be allowed to reach.”

Let’s hope that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other government agencies join in the effort to regulate the sound levels on these devices. Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable, after all, and given that there is no effective treatment or cure for hearing loss, anything less than a robust response would be criminal.

 

 

Is there a link between NYC noise and crime?

Photo credit: Tony Fischer licensed under CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The Crime Report examines a recent report about New York City noise by New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli. It’s fascinating read and carefully documents the chronic problem of noise in New York City along what the City has been doing (and not doing) to address it. More importantly, the article notes that “[n]oise complaints may be a clue to what else is going on in an apartment,” such as child or elder abuse or drug dealing, and, in any event, “not enforcing noise ordinances creates an environment that encourages lawbreaking.”

The author of the article is GrowNYC board member Arline Bronzaft, PhD, who is also a co-founder of The Quiet Coalition. In her article, Dr. Bronzaft discusses the link between crime and noise and why the City should devote more enforcement resources to the issue to improve the health, safety and welfare of New York City’s residents.

Thank you, Dr. Bronzaft for your passionate and long-term commitment to this subject!

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

A mysterious noise bedevils Windsor, Ontario

Is Zug Island the source of the hum?   Photo credit: Tara licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The perception of low frequency sound–infrasound, usually defined as lower than 20 Hertz (cycles per second)–and its health effects are not well understood. But something is bothering the residents of Windsor, Ontario, and it’s called the Windsor hum.

For more information on the hum, here’s a Vice News video:

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

What does your city sound like?

Photo credit: Thomas licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

DW.com columnist Gero Schliess writes about the sound of Berlin. He invites the reader to “[c]lose your eyes” and “[i]magine a stroll through your city, with your eyes closed, but open ears.” As he meanders through his tour of Berlin, he tells us what he hears and how it reflects the city’s current state of being. His ramble veers off occasionally, as he mentions that the Berlin state government has published a “strategic noise map,” but notes that although noise pollution is a deadly problem, “the city doesn’t lift a finger except for printing pretty noise maps.”

Another interesting fact Schliess tells us is Berlin’s state government’s approach to dealing with noisy nightclubs.  Rather than fining them, the government “has set up a €1-million ($1.24-million) fund to help night clubs pay for extra noise insulation measure.”  While Schliess applauds the program, he laments the loss of what he calls “heavenly sounds”–“[t]he booming bass, the shrieking exalted party people–due to the heavy hand of the law, which has turned “former party miles like Prenzlauer Berg into quiet bedroom suburbs.”

Whether you agree or disagree with his appreciation of all of Berlins sounds (except the traffic noise), we think you’ll agree that Schliess’ piece is a unique observation of a city. And it makes you consider how odd it is that a city’s soundscape is so important to its character, yet it is mostly ignored by those who attempt to describe it.

 

 

Is there universality in music?

Photo credit: shankar s. licensed under CC BY 2.0

By Antonella Radicchi, PhD, Steering Committee Member, The Quiet Coalition

Despite its inherently subjective nature, music appears to be universal across different cultures around the globe, according to the findings of a hot-off-the-press Harvard study published January in Current Biology.

This interdisciplinary study, run by an international team of scientists from Harvard University and the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse, produced significant findings that suggest people can infer song function on the basis of song form alone, regardless of the song’s cultural origin.

The scientists were committed to filling the gap of knowledge regarding the lack of empirical evidence for whether or not different types of music share common features across cultures. To address this issue they designed a study based on two experiments.

In the first experiment, 750 online participants in 60 countries were asked to listen to 14-second long excerpts of songs collected from nearly 90 small societies around the globe. The songs were drawn from the collection of the Natural History of Song–a Harvard-based project investigating the world’s vocal music–and focused on three types: dance, healing, and lullaby. Participants were then asked to rate the association between the vocal songs and their potential functions, on a scale composed of six prevalent functions, such as dancing, soothing a baby, healing illness, expressing love, mourning a death, and telling a story.

Data collected through first experiment showed that people were able to infer the song function only on the basis of the song form, despite the random sampling of the songs, the short duration of the excerpts, and the unfamiliarity of the online participants with the cultures were the songs originated. This finding contradicted academic expert projections–when ethnomusicologists were asked by the scientists whether people could deduct the song function from the song from or not, they were skeptical and expressed doubt. But they were wrong.

The scientists continued with a second experiment that evaluated potential commonalities in music making across cultures by asking the online participants to rate contextual and musical features, such as the number and gender of the singers, the melodic complexity of the songs, etc. Again, the results were very consistent, and by comparing the results form both the experiments scientists were able to argue that common musical features exist across cultural boundaries.

Despite the promising results, a significant weakness affects the study, as highlighted by the lead scientist: the participants were people who have had access to Internet and probably were familiar with vocal songs from different cultures. In this regard, it remains unclear whether the results reveal the structure of the human mind or they tell us how and what the contemporary listeners hear in world music.

This bias will be addressed in a follow-up study in which the survey will be translated in 24 languages so the scientists can extend the number of countries involved. Furthermore–and this sounds very exciting!–the scientists aim to bring the study into the field and play in real time songs excerpts for members of small societies based in Indonesia, Ethiopia, and elsewhere.

Stay tuned for further amazing results!

Dr. Radicchi’s main area of expertise encompasses innovative urban design and planning, soundscape research, citizen science, and mobile technology. Her ultimate goal is to design environmentally just and human scale cities. Dr. Radicchi is a registered architect, and she holds a Ph.D. in Urban Design and Territorial Planning, with doctoral studies conducted at MIT and at the University of Firenze. She is currently an Ipodi-Marie Curie Fellow at TU Berlin Institute of City & Regional Planning, where she has created and run two innovative soundscape projects, including the Hush City app, a citizen science tool for empowering people to identify, map, and evaluate quiet areas worldwide.  Dr. Radicchi is a steering committee member of The Quiet Coalition.

Looking for a quiet place?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This review of a science fiction horror movie, A Quiet Place, discusses the movie’s basic premise, namely: “Living an isolated existence, the onscreen duo are trying to protect their children from an unseen menace. As the trailer tells us, if they hear you, they’ll hunt you.“

That’s a very interesting premise for a movie, regardless of what the menace is. The hearing sense evolved from a primitive vibration sense, which developed in primitive one-celled organisms to help them either find food or avoid becoming another organism’s food. Humans and our invertebrate, vertebrate, and primate ancestors evolved in quiet, as shown by the National Park Service noise map. And there was no selective advantage to any protective mechanisms from loud noise; in fact, from the external ear to the auditory canal to middle ear and inner ear adaptations, everything possible was done for the human ear to amplify sound.

This is why noise is so bad for humans. And all parents would be wise to protect their children from the unseen menace of noise causing hearing loss.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.