Monthly Archive: April 2018

Hear livestreaming audio from 4,000 feet below the ocean

Photo credit: Matt McGee licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

courtesy of researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute via an ultra-sensitive microphone, a hydrophone, that was installed about 20 miles off the California coast in 2015. The “audio is amplified so you can hear it with normal speakers, but some creatures — like the baleen whale — require high-quality headphones or a subwoofer to hear the low frequency vocalizations.” Depending on when you tune in, you may hear nothing or you could hear “whales, dolphins, sea lions, boats, rain, wind, earthquakes, and other sounds.”

Intrigued? Click here to listen in:

CDC issues warning about power tool noise

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has just published a fact sheet about the dangers of power tool noise for hearing.

I grew up helping my father maintain the small apartment house in which we lived, and still do a lot of home maintenance indoors and out.

After I became a noise activist in 2014 and learned how dangerous noise is for our ears, I have become much more protective about my hearing. If I use almost any tool louder than a screwdriver or a rake, I use hearing protection. Even when I hammer in one nail, and certainly if it’s any tool that has a motor.

And so should you.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

A beautiful noise: noise as protest

Armenian women, as part of the mass antigovernment protests that erupted over the idea that former president Serzh Sarkisian would be prime minister just after serving two terms as president, tell him it’s his him it’s his ‘Last Call’.

Borrowing a page from similar protests around the world, Armenian women banged pots, pans, and other utensils for 15 minutes at 11:00 p.m. on April 22nd in Yerevan, the Armenian capital.  And here is what Sarkisian heard:

And the next day, he resigned.

First potential biomarker for noise-induced hearing loss identified

The author, Julia R. Barrett, has dedicated this image to the public domain.

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Researchers at the University of Connecticut found increase levels of a protein called prestin in blood after exposure to loud noise. The prestin comes from the hair cells in the cochlea when they are damaged by noise. If this research holds up, it can help researchers study drugs that might prevent hearing loss from noise exposure.

Of course, one doesn’t need a new protein or a drug to prevent hearing loss from noise exposure.

Just avoid loud noise.

If the ambient noise level is high enough that you have to strain to speak or to be heard when having a normal conversation, the ambient noise is above 75 A-weighted decibels, and your hearing is being damaged.

Remember: if it sounds, too loud, it IS too loud!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

What was the loudest sound on earth?

It was caused by a record-breaking volcanic eruption on the island of Krakatoa, that was so loud that “[s]hock waves from the eruption travelled around the world several times, and created a tsunami over 45 metres tall” and it “shattered eardrums more than 50 km away.”

ScienceAlert adds that “the force of the blast was 10,000 times that of a hydrogen bomb” and the decibel level reached 172, which had to be unbearably punishing since the pain threshold is 130 dB and the decibel scale is logarithmic.

It’s obviously hard to protect yourself against this sort of event, which happened over 125 years ago, but the reports of the world’s loudest known noise is instructive: noise is destructive.

 

 

Update: A small but not insignificant noise victory

Photo credit: mjmonty licensed under CC BY 2.0

Last September we told you that Google–finally–was going to block noisy autoplay videos in Chrome in January 2018.  But January came, and autoplay persisted. Until now.

The Guardian reports that “one of the most irritating things about the modern web” is done.

A small victory indeed.

April 25th is International Noise Awareness Day

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Wednesday, April 25th marks the 23rd annual celebration of International Noise Awareness Day, an event born in the U.S. that has grown into an international occasion.

Congratulations to the event’s founder, Nancy Nadler, for her pioneering work and to other Americans who have long contributed to and supported it, including The Quiet Coalition founding member, Arline Bronzaft PhD.

Commenting on the history and significance of International Noise Awareness Day, Dr. Bronzaft said:
In 1992, I worked with Nancy Nadler, now the Deputy Executive Director of Center for Hearing and Communication (CHC), when she created the Noise Center and four years later I was part of the CHC group who introduced International Noise Awareness Day (INAD) worldwide. In New York City, INAD was recognized with a Mayoral Proclamation at City Hall, poster contests in schools speaking to the dangers of noise, vans provided by CHC to assess hearing of New Yorkers and panel discussions on noise throughout the city. One year, the Borough President of Brooklyn feted the children of the winning Noise Poster Contest, as well as their parents, at a Borough Hall reception.

In the U.S., International Noise Awareness Day precedes the month long celebration of May as Better Hearing and Speech Month led by the National Institute of Deafness and Communication Disorders, the American Speech Language Hearing Association, and other scientific, professional, and governmental organizations.

TQC’s founders hope that professionals in public health and hearing health will join with researchers and citizens representing the 48 million Americans who suffer from hearing disorders to mark both International Noise Awareness Day and Better Hearing and Speech Month.

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.