Monthly Archive: May 2018

Disturb everyone else with your noise, but protect yourself

Oh the irony.

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, the Quiet Coalition

This report at Motorcycle.com lists earplugs good for motorcycle riders.

The idea of protecting your own hearing, while bothering and deafening others with your motorcycle’s noise, is ironic.

Riding a motorcycle is a dangerous pastime, and many riders believe that a louder motorcycle is a safer one because drivers of other vehicles can hear them. Most experts, however, think that’s really not true and posit that many riders just like to make as much noise as possible to show how profoundly anti-social they are.

What they–and most police departments–don’t know is that there are state and federal laws regulating motorcycle exhaust noise, and the best way to avoid noise-induced hearing loss is to reduce the noise level at its source.

So rather than offering advice on protecting hearing to those who would impose their noise on the rest of us, Motorcycle.com, why not tell your readers to respect others by removing the illegal straight-pipe exhaust systems they put on their bikes?

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Dr. Erica Walker takes on Boston’s noise

Photo credit: Robbie Shade licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Boston Globe looks at the important work conducted by Dr. Erica Walker, research scientist and creator of the NoiseScore app, who is tackling Boston’s noise head on.  As writer Chris Berdik states, “Walker may know more about noise in Boston than anyone.” And because she also knows about the dangers of noise, Walker is dedicated to informing the public about this “little-studied pollution.”  As Berdik writes:

New research by Walker and others suggests that noise doesn’t just hurt our hearing. Chronic noise exposure floods the body with stress hormones that can lead to higher blood pressure, more blood clots, and a greater likelihood of heart problems and stroke.

Berdik says that Walker believes public health researchers “don’t take noise seriously enough, particularly in the United States,” and that her goal it to change that by “starting with creating a more comprehensive measure of noise exposure”

We applaud Dr. Walker’s hard work and dedication in protecting our public health.

London’s Heathrow ranks airlines by noise ratings

Photo credit: Paul Hudson licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Many of us frequent flyers use Heathrow (airport code LHR) as an entry point to Europe, especially those of us from the west coast.

In 2017, LHR ranked was the seventh busiest airport in the world, with 78 million passengers passing through it.

LHR just released noise rankings for the airlines using its space. There are a number of rankings–noise per passenger seat and noise ratings by airplanes flown are two–but what is probably the most important noise rating, number of noisy flights per airline or average noise rating per flight for each airline, is missing.

Maybe an American airport or the Federal Aviation Administration can lead the way on these measurements in the U.S.?

Just a thought!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

A healthy diet might protect against hearing loss, but noise is still the problem

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This study shows that a healthy diet can help women protect their hearing.

It has long been known that high blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking were associated with hearing loss, probably because they cause atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), and anything that affects blood flow to the inner ear (cochlea) might cause damage, or make the cochlea less able to recover from noise damage. A healthy diet can reduce or prevent atherosclerosis. So that is probably the explanation for this finding, done using nurses as subjects.

So would I suggest that women adopt a healthy diet to protect their hearing? Of course! But whether a woman (or a man) eats a healthy diet or not, avoiding noise exposure will definitely prevent hearing loss.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it is too loud!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

What is the relationship between photography and sound?

 

Cities and Memories, “a global collaborative sound project,” has launched Sound Photography, which they describe as “the biggest ever worldwide artistic interaction between photographers and sound artists.” The project has sound pieces that accompany photos from 34 countries.

Click this link to see a gallery of images, or this one to access the sound photography map.

And be prepared to lose yourself for a few hours as you navigate the sights and sounds of the world.

On adding sound to electric cars: a modest proposal

Rod Liddle, The Spectator, puts a poison pen to paper in a plea to the powers that be, pleading that electric cars be kept quiet even if they hit a few pedestrians.

While we understand Liddle’s dislike of unnecessary noise, his proposal is a bit harsh, though to his credit he doesn’t carve out an exception for himself as he writes:

[S]crap the noise-making device idea and let the pedestrians die. I am one of them and am fully prepared to take that risk. Let them die.

 

 

 

Federal judge upholds city’s noise ordinance

Photo credit: Tony Hisgett licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

From time to time The Quiet Coalition gets inquiries or requests for help in dealing with local noise problems. Each one of these situations is very different, from airplane noise to noise from factories, and TQC can only offer general advice:

1. Research the local noise ordinances.

2. Figure out which person at which agency is responsible for handling noise complaints.

3. Document each and every violation of the noise ordinance, with copies to elected officials for the jurisdiction(s) involved and to local news media.

4. Involve local news media if possible.

5. Involve local schools with noise measurement, documentation, and reporting being part of class projects beginning with fourth or fifth grade and going up through high school.

While this advice doesn’t always get the result the inquirer wants, things are beginning to change and decision makers–whether at the city, state, or federal level–are starting to take noise seriously.  And as this report shows, sometimes the courts will uphold enforcement of local noise control and nuisance abatement ordinances.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.