Monthly Archive: August 2018

Hospitals can be made quieter

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This BBC report informs us that hospitals can become quieter. Anyone who has been in a hospital–and I have spent decades working in them–knows that despite signs encouraging quiet, they have become noisier. And studies document that, too.

But with a little effort, they can be made quieter.

Most people aren’t aware of major efforts–coordinated over the last several years and involving specialty societies and expert groups setting goals and developing standards to be implemented by hospitals, health care professionals, emergency services responders, and an informed public–that have dramatically improved medical care and patient outcomes for serious medical problems. When someone calls 911 to report a heart attack or stroke, an entire team is mobilized to treat the patient with clot-busting drugs as quickly as possible, ideally within only 60 minutes of the event. These “Code White”, “Code Stroke”, or “Stroke Attack” programs mean that the patient usually walks out of the hospital not only alive but with minimal or even no residual effects from the heart attack or stroke.

If the health care system can organize itself to treat these serious medical problems so quickly that the patients recover without harm, it should be able to work towards making hospitals and other health care facilities quieter. This isn’t rocket science. It’s basic acoustic engineering.

Members of The Quiet Coalition also serve on committees for the Facilities Guidance Institute, which sets standards for health care facilities. There are guidelines and standards for noise levels. The next edition of the guidelines, set to be published in 2022, will address the noise issue more vigorously.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Meanwhile, in France…

Photo credit: G.M. Briggs (a game of pétanque in Bryant Park, NYC)

The Local France reports that a French mayor has banned ‘noisy’ pétanque playing  during “anti-social hours.” Seems harsh, butan “official document” notes that “the activity of pétanque playing causes repeated noise such as rattling balls, accompanied by the sound of loud voices and screams.” Anyone who has been in a sports bar during an “important” game will surely understand.

In any event, the mayor’s ban is reasonable–it is only from 11:00 p.m. to 8:00 a.m.–and exceptions will be considered.

Hospital noise reduces children’s sleep time

Photo credit: rawpixel.com from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report discusses a study showing that hospital noise reduces children’s sleep time.

Noise disrupting sleep isn’t just a problem for children in the hospital. Humans can’t close our ears. Even if it doesn’t waken us, noise in the 35 decibel range can disrupt EEG patterns. And these disruptions–called microarousals–have the same impact on heart rate and stress hormone levels as a noise loud enough to waken someone from a deep sleep.

Both in the hospital and in our homes, a quiet bedroom helps us sleep, and that’s important for health and function.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

 

 

There must be a German word for this

Photo credit: tinyfroglet licensed under CC BY 2.0

We are going with the phrase “absichtlich nervig”–intentionally annoying: Dezeen reports that German’s national rail service, Deutsche Bahn, has come up with novel and offensive way to “deter crime” in a Berlin station: playing atonal music to drive away “loiterers.”

So how does this work? Dezeen writes that pyschological studies have shown that “to non-expert listeners, listening to atonal music can raise blood pressure, and increase agitation and anxiety.”

Deutsche Bahn hopes the annoying sound will “discourage people from lingering,” apparently unconcerned about travelers who have no option but to wait at the station for their train.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft noise kills

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report about a Columbia University study estimates how many New York City residents under the flight paths near La Guardia Airport will suffer adverse health outcomes, including shorter lives.

Noise isn’t just a nuisance. Transportation noise has been extensively studied in Europe. There can be no rational doubt about its adverse health effects, as recently summarized by Munzel et al.

This problem is recognized by European authorities, who have mandated that airports and airlines take steps to minimize noise exposure for those living near airports and under flight paths.

The FAA and CDC haven’t recognized the problem on this side of the Atlantic Ocean, but if enough people speak up and demand that their elected representatives act, things can change.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The best ear protection for babies and toddlers

Photo credit: Fimb licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As a newly minted grandfather, I worry even more about the world and the future, and what it will hold for our grandson and for all children and grandchildren, especially about keeping him safe and healthy. The Centers for Disease Control and the American Academy of Pediatrics have lots of advice about avoiding sun exposure, but little to nothing about avoiding noise exposure.

This report reviews four earmuff-style hearing protective devices–that’s the correct term, not headphones–that are good for babies and toddlers.

A few quibbles. The article doesn’t state how these were evaluated. NIOSH and OSHA evaluate hearing protective devices and assign a Noise Reduction Rating-NRR, but this evaluation appears to be the opinion of one audiologist.

And while I’m glad that the industrial-strength 85 decibel sound exposure level wasn’t mentioned as the noise level at which hearing damage occurs, the 70 decibel standard cited may be too low. Sound above 70 decibels for short time periods probably won’t cause hearing loss. It’s a time-weighted average sound exposure of 70 decibels for the whole day that prevents noise-induced hearing loss. Noise dose calculators like this one can help one understand what constitutes safe noise exposures.

More information about noise and children’s hearing is provided by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

Parents and grandparents should remember that to protect children’s hearing, if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Common recreational activities, including using certain toys, birthday and other parties with amplified music, sports events, air shows, car races, and children’s action movies, are often dangerously loud.

And headphones should probably not be used by children for personal music players or digital devices, with or without an 85 decibel volume limit.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

More than half of “NYC’s noisiest bars” are in Brooklyn

Photo credit: The All-Nite Images licensed under CC BY 2.0

Surprising no one who lives there.

So what can be done about the noise? Gothamist doesn’t hold out much hope, stating:

It will be interesting to see if the city’s Night Mayor, Ariel Palitz will have any response to this list. But don’t count on it; Palitz used to be the owner of the now-shuttered Sutra nightclub in the East Village, considered one of New York’s loudest bars.

We agree with Gothamist. Dr. Arline Bronzaft wrote about Palitz’ appointment at the time and graciously offered her advice garnered from a life time of experience addressing New York City noise.  But, sadly, the city has apparently opted to ignore the advice of experts–among other things, Dr. Bronzaft, a board member of GrowNYC, has advised the last five mayors on matters of noise–focusing instead on the opinions of an advisory board that is well represented by DJs, performers, and bar owners.  Good luck, Brooklyn.

Headphone volume may cause harm to hearing

Photo credit: Kaboompics .com from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Here is yet another report, this time from Baylor University, that headphone use may cause harm to hearing.

I agree with everything stated in the report except for the assertion that 85 decibels is the dangerous sound level. This standard is derived from occupational noise exposure levels, and in 2016, NIOSH reiterated that this is not a safe noise exposure level for the public.

And headphone use may be different because the sound source is only millimeters away from the ear drum, with the external auditory canal being even shorter in children than in adults.

Personally, I would advise against the use of headphones and ear buds, period.  If you insist on using them keep in mind that if you can’t hear ambient noise when listening to content or music using headphones or earbuds, the volume is too high and is almost certainly causing hearing loss.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Din with your dinner?

Photo credit: bruce mars from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Meredith Goad, Portland Press-Herald, writes about restaurant noise and how diners are getting fed up with the din that invariably accompanies their dinner. Her piece is thorough and respectful, and her suggestions are thoughtful.  Yes, tell the manager that the loud music is the reason you will not be returning, and do download a sound meter app so you can measure decibel levels when you eat out.

That said, one doesn’t need a sound meter app to know if it’s too loud. If you have to strain to speak or to be heard, the ambient noise level is above 75 A-weighted decibels and your hearing is being damaged. And no meal is worth permanent hearing damage.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.