Monthly Archive: February 2020

Even with noise limits, loud noise at events still causes hearing damage

Photo credit: Wendy Wei from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article from the Netherlands reports that even with a regulatory maximum noise level for events and concerts, auditory damage still occurred. The Dutch Ministry of Public Health, Welfare, and Sports set the maximum noise level for events and concerts at 103 decibels (dB).

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure levels for noise are 1.5 hours at 100 A-weighted decibels (dBA) and one hour at 105 dBA. A-weighting adjusts the frequencies of sound for those heard in human speech. A-weighted sound measurements almost always are lower than unweighted measurements, with the exact difference depending on a variety of factors.

So 103 dB is pretty high, loud enough to cause hearing loss.

The problem with the Dutch noise levels was that the Dutch regulators somehow assumed that those attending loud events would be wearing hearing protection, but neglected to include this important requirement in information distributed to the public. About half of Dutch concertgoers never wear hearing protection, so they must be sustaining auditory damage, including noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus.

The trade association representing music venues, concert halls, and event organizers maintains that it is the responsibility of those attending events and concerts to protect their own hearing, but I disagree. I think it’s the responsibility of governments and public health authorities to protect the public, or at least to give them complete and accurate information. Not “caveat auditor”!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Quieter electric planes are already in the air

Photo credit: Matti Blume licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Some readers think electrically-powered aircraft are a wild-eyed futuristic idea—not so! Quieter all-electric, battery-powered aircraft are already flying. Most of these are one- or two-passenger planes but they demonstrate the viability and economic attractiveness of battery-powered electric planes. This video shows you ten models you can buy and fly now:

Perhaps the most exciting one in this video is the 11-seat (9 passengers plus two pilots) Israeli-designed “Eviation Alice” which is intended for commercial, commuter flights. The first customer for the Eviation Alice, CapeAir, based in the eastern U.S., signed up in mid-2019 and has placed an order for delivery in 2022.

The big player in this transformation to electric aircraft is not an American company. It’s Germany’s Siemens. So far Boeing and it’s engine-maker GE are not doing anything in this space, just sitting on the sidelines and waiting for somebody else to go first. But with Boeing’s GE-powered 737MAX completely and indefinitely grounded worldwide, perhaps that partnership isn’t in a mood for innovation right now.

Electric propulsion of larger airliners—the kind of planes most of us ride like Airbus A320s, etc.—won’t arrive until battery technology takes the next big leap. But Tesla’s Elon Musk is a major player in that effort, so keep an eye on him in this sector, too. He’s not just a car and rocket guy, he’s also keenly interested in electric aircraft.

Airports are certainly not quiet now, and the FAA seems to be working hard to stall improvement. But no matter what the FAA and regional airport authorities do, the electric revolution in aircraft is showing that quieter, more fuel-efficient flight is closer than we might have thought!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Warning labels work

Photo credit: Aeveraal licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Consumers want relevant information about products they buy, and warning labels work. That’s the message inherent in this New York Times report on food warning labels for salt, fat, sugar, and calories in Chile. Chile has one of the highest obesity rates in the world. With health care costs for obesity-related medical care soaring, the government decided to take action and began requiring black octagonal warning labels on the front of food packages. The laws also banned junk food sales in schools, and prohibited television ads for unhealthy food between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m.

Of course, the big multinational food companies who market candy, snacks, sodas, and fruit juices protested and lobbied against the legislation, but it passed and was signed into law.

Guess what? Junk food consumption is down 25% in Chile, and other countries are contemplating passing similar legislation.

I am convinced that if warning labels were required on personal listening devices and accessories like earbuds and headphones, people would use them less. I would suggest the following: WARNING: USE OF THIS DEVICE CAN CAUSE HEARING LOSS.  But I’m sure other wording might be more effective.

It’s obvious that the device manufacturers, like the junk food vendors, don’t care about consumers. All they care about is profits. It’s up to governments to protect their citizens, as Chile has done. That’s their job.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

AARP focuses on musicians and hearing loss

Photo credit: Alex G licensed under CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Noise-induced hearing loss afflicts people of all ages, but since it’s cumulative and incurable, the greatest burden falls on older people who have incessantly exposed themselves to loud noise in their careers and due to recreational choices. Such is the case with many stars in music and entertainment. AARP recently reviewed research from Germany that analyzed the heath insurance records of 7 million people from 2004 to 2008 and found that “working musicians are nearly four times more likely to suffer noise-induced hearing loss than those in any other profession”…. and they were “57% more likely to have tinnitus brought on by their work.”

Hearing Health magazine also recently reported on this and included a list of a dozen well-known performers who’ve given up music due to hearing loss.

So if you’re wondering why some of your favorite rock stars aren’t touring any more, it’s possible they simply can’t hear what they’re performing. Sure, everybody knows classical composer Ludwig von Beethoven wrote—and even conducted–some his finest work after he was completely deaf. But if you’ve read about him, you would also know how profoundly unhappy he was about it.

Our ability to hear isn’t self-repairing–once you’ve blown your ears, they’re gone for good. So it’s good news that AARP seems to be awakening to the problem of noise-induced hearing loss. They’re big and powerful enough to get things done in Washington DC, where the health effects of exposure to loud sound was swept under the rug nearly 40 years ago. It’s definitely time for AARP to pay attention!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Why are spin classes so loud (and does it matter)?

Photo credit: Aberdeen Proving Ground licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Why are spin classes so loud? This post on The Cut doesn’t really answer that question, but it does a nice job of explaining the dangers of excessive noise for auditory health.

A few years ago I had email exchanges with two researchers who study the effects of noise on athletic performance. Music with a specific beat can help rhythmic activities, like running or spinning at a constant pace, but despite common belief there is no evidence that loud music makes anyone run faster or lift more weight, or in this case spin faster.

Even if music does improve performance–or people think it improves their performance–those theoretical advantages are outweighed by almost certain auditory damage, including hearing loss and tinnitus.

I’m glad the author of this piece had a best friend who became an audiologist and educated her about the dangers of noise. Because if the noise in your spin class–or any exercise class, or really anywhere at all–sounds too loud, it is too loud.

And if the noise is loud enough to be painful, it’s dangerous for your ears. Period.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Sarasota restaurants are getting louder, too

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Restaurant noise is a major problem for diners, now being the leading complaint in the latest Zagat restaurant survey. And this article from Sarasota Magazine says it’s a problem there, too.

The writer makes the common error citing the 85 decibel occupational noise exposure limit as the sound level at which auditory damage begins, noting restaurant noise levels of 92 decibels at one popular restaurant. Eighty-five decibels is not a safe noise level to prevent hearing loss.

The World Health Organization recommends only one hour of exposure at 85 A-weighted decibels* to prevent hearing loss. And a typical restaurant meal lasts 90-120 minutes, depending on the speed of the service, the dining choices, and whether one lingers beforehand over drinks or afterwards for coffee and dessert. So all diners at the restaurant were at risk of hearing loss.

Is this a real problem? Yes! In 2017 the CDC reported that 24% of American adults had noise-induced hearing loss, most without significant occupational noise exposure.

Choosing a quieter restaurant, as an economist friend suggested, isn’t a realistic option. In most cities, there are few if any quiet restaurants, and a less noisy one is the only option if one wants to eat a restaurant meal.

It’s clear that restaurant noise is an example of market failure, and that regulator action is needed to protect diners’ auditory health.

*A-weighting adjusts sound measurements to reflect the frequencies heard in human speech.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

6 in 10 workers complain about workplace distraction

Photo credit: Cadeau Maestro from Pexels

And what are the biggest culprits?  No surprise: noisy talkers, loud recreation, and open concept offices.

The article linked above references a study that was conducted in Canada, but there’s no reason to suspect that the experience of U.S. workers is any different.  In the end, any savings in real estate expense must be outweighed by lost productivity due to noisy, distracting environments.

But is the productivity loss measureable? If yes, is it significant?

Yes and yes. According to a survey by coworking company iQ Offices, fighting distractions leads to “up to two hours per day of lost productivity.”

Two hours per day per employee.  It adds up.

 

Nature’s sounds calm urban anxiety

Photo credit: Gabriela Palai from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

In this personal essay, printed in the Washington Post, writer Paige Towers discusses how New York City’s noise worsened her anxiety, but a move to Milwaukee, where nature’s quiet was more accessible, helped her regain her calm.

Some people claim to love urban noise. New York City is famously “the city that never sleeps.” But its noise is loud enough to cause hearing loss and for many people, noise is stressful.

In Japan, doctors can prescribe nature therapy, which they call forest bathing.

But you don’t need a doctor’s prescription to go out and enjoy nature’s quiet on your own. Try it!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

David Owen’s “Volume Control” gains attention

Photo credit: Nicholas Githiri from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

New Yorker writer David Owen’s new book, “Volume Control,” continues to attract attention. On Friday, February 7, National Public Radio’s Kara Miller interviewed Owen on her show “Innovation Hub” (look for the episode “Can you hear me now?” in the link above).

Last November 5th, NPR’s Terry Gross interviewed Owen about his new book on “Fresh Air.” If you haven’t picked up a copy, do so–or tell your library to buy several copies because it’s in demand. Owen’s interview with Kara Miller begins by Owen describing Dr. Arline Bronzaft’s landmark research on the impacts of noise on kids’ ability to learn in Manhattan in the 1970s, a piece of research that led to an ANSI national standard and broad awareness of learning deficits. That was a true success during the brief period in the 1970s before noise was “pushed off the table” by industries that didn’t want to be bothered and a U.S. president who, though hearing-impaired himself, didn’t think the issue merited national attention.

Now it’s back. Owen’s book is one of a string of popular books that have emerged over the past decade on this subject: George Prochnik’s well-reviewed book “In Pursuit of Silence” (2010) became a successful documentary film with the same title in 2015. Garrett Keizer’s 2010 book “The Unwanted Sound Of Everything We Want” got excellent reviews in 2012. And also in 2012, the book “Why Noise Matters,” with a chapter by Dr. Bronzaft, has contributed to the public dialogue on the issue of noise and noise control. And, of course, there’s the National Academy of Engineering report in 2011, “Technology for a Quieter America,” and the World Health Organization’s two-volume “Burden of Disease from Environmental Noise.”

But David Owen’s book is not a “policy treatise”—it’s a wonderfully entertaining narrative filled with fascinating first-hand stories. And underneath it all he recognizes that noise is fundamentally a health problem—and a burgeoning public health problem. Watch his short video for The New Yorker to get a taste: 

This book deserves everyone’s attention—so if you’re a member of a book club, please recommend it!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Lip reading: “I can’t hear you in the dark”

Photo credit: mail_collector licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The only treatments for hearing loss are hearing aids with cochlear implants reserved for the profoundly hearing impaired or those born deaf. The only rehabilitation for hearing loss is lip reading or sign language. Most people with severe hearing loss use lip reading to understand speech. Learning American sign language won’t help because few other than the deaf speak it.

This insightful essay by someone who wears hearing aids but largely uses lip reading to understand what people are saying offers a wonderful insight into what it’s like to use lip reading. Understanding comes from looking at the speaker’s mouth, facial expression, body movements, and of course hand and arm motions and position.

But the room can’t only be quiet. It has to be well-lit, too.

I don’t know that I could learn to lip read. I’ve tried, and it’s very difficult for me. Even more reason for me to protect my hearing by avoiding loud noise or inserting ear plugs if I can’t.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.