Search Results for: noise restaurants

Number of Results: 91

It’s not just the noise level in restaurants but the type of noise that matters

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This Denver Post article correctly makes the point that patrons don’t want a too noisy restaurant but they don’t want a too quiet one, either.

There is a fine balance between ambient noise levels that allow one to converse with your dining companions, but are loud or complex enough to mask conversations from nearby tables.

And the quality of the noise–is it sharp, tinkling, reverberating?–also makes a difference in the restaurant experience.

The article also notes that it’s hard to design the right sound environment into the restaurant and that adjustments are often needed after a restaurant opens.

DISCLOSURE: The article mentions the SoundPrint app for measuring restaurant noise. I serve as the Medical Advisor to SoundPrint.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Restaurant critic discusses restaurant noise

Photo credit: Lou Stejskal licensed under CC BY 2.0

This interesting piece by San Francisco Chronicle’s restaurant critic Soleil Ho tries to balance all aspects of restaurant noise. I think she does an excellent job discussing various aspects of restaurant noise, including costly technological solutions to the noise problem, except for one thing: ambient noise in restaurants is a major disability rights issue.

The good news is that it’s feasible to make restaurants quieter. If enough people ask restaurant managers to turn down the music, if enough people ask their elected representatives for quiet restaurant legislation, this will happen.

Remember when almost all restaurants were filled with secondhand smoke?  Now we enjoy pleasant, healthier, smoke-free restaurants. And in the future, I am confident we will be able to dine in quieter restaurants, enjoying both the meal and the conversation with our dining companions.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Restaurant noise? For the hearing impaired, that’s discrimination

Photo credit: Dmitry Zvolskiy from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Citing noise as discrimination, Joyce Cohen, writing for the Washington Post, goes after the restaurant industry. I’m grateful that Ms. Cohen relied on The Quiet Coalition Chair, Dr. Daniel Fink, in this terrific piece, and that she did her homework to get the facts straight.

I hope this kind of reporting will lead to changes in the restaurant industry, which, thanks to Yelp and Zagat and restaurant reviewers at newspapers like the Washington Post, are showing that noise is the number one complaint of restaurant goers. Let’s hope that restaurant owners are finally waking up to the fact that too much noise is actually bad for business.

And congratulations to the Washington Post for taking on this industry and it’s egregious practices! This article has certainly opened up the conversation about restaurant noise and disability.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Why boomers hate restaurants targeting millennials

Photo credit: Evonics from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Baby boomers, those of us born between 1946 and 1964 and, therefore, now 55 to 73 years old, hate noisy restaurants. As this article by Sara Zeff Geber in Forbes notes, we remember when restaurants were quiet enough to enjoy both the food and the conversation. That’s rarely possible now.

As Geber notes, changes in restaurant design, and a belief that a noisy restaurant is a trendy hip one, make it difficult if not impossible to find quiet restaurants in most American cities.

More people lead busy lives and have more disposable income, so restaurants are busier than ever and restaurateurs see no need to change what they are doing.

But restaurant noise is a disability rights issue for those with hearing loss and other auditory disorders. And noise levels in many restaurants and bars are high enough to cause hearing loss.

It’s clear that market forces won’t solve the problem of restaurant noise. So what can we do? If enough people complain to enough elected officials, someone somewhere will take action to require quieter restaurants.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Restaurant noise a problem in Maine

Photo credit: Paul VanDerWerf licensed under CC BY2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article by Nancy Harmon Jenkins in the Portland Press Herald discusses restaurant noise in Maine, where enjoyment of fresh, locally caught or harvested food is undercut by too noisy restaurants.

When will restaurateurs get the message: turn down the volume of amplified sound? If restaurant patrons wanted to attend a rock concert, we would. But what we actually want to do is enjoy a meal and conversation with our dining companions.

Thanks to Lisa Beach for bringing this article to our attention.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Another report about restaurant noise

Photo credit: Brett Sayles from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in USA Today, one of the most widely circulated newspapers in the U.S. with global reach, again highlights the problem of restaurant noise. Restaurant noise is now the leading complaint of restaurant patrons in Zagat surveys, this year edging out the usual leading complaints of poor service and high prices. The article also cites the recent Washington Post article about the disability rights aspects of restaurant noise, in which I am extensively quoted.

Restaurant noise isn’t just a discomfort issue or a disability rights issue. It’s a health and public health issue.

In many restaurants and bars, noise levels exceed 85 A-weighted decibels (dBA), and according to the World Health Organization, only one hour exposure at 85 dBA can cause hearing loss.

I wear inconspicuous plastic ear plugs in noisy restaurants to protect my hearing, and so should you. And you don’t need a sound meter app on your smart phone to know if the ambient noise is too high: If you have to strain to speak or to be heard, the ambient noise is above 75 dBA, and your hearing is at risk.

Because if something sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Nigella Lawson hates loud restaurants

Photo credit: Brian Minkoff- London Pixels licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

According to this article in the UK’s Daily Mail, food writer and TV chef Nigella Lawson doesn’t like loud music in restaurants because it “drowns out the taste of the food.”

There is published research showing that noise can affect food choices and change taste sensations, but that’s not why most people complain about restaurant noise.

Most of us complain about it because we want to have a nice conversation with our dining companions, and that’s just not possible in most restaurants today.

I’m old enough to remember when secondhand smoke made dining unpleasant. People complained, and science showed that secondhand smoke was a health danger. As a result, laws and regulations changed, and now almost all indoor spaces are smoke free.

There can be no rational doubt that noise is a health and public health hazard, and that sound levels in many restaurants are loud enough to cause hearing loss.

If enough people complain to their elected officials and demand regulation, restaurants can be made quieter, too

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Restaurant noise? For the hearing impaired, that’s discrimination

Photo credit: Dmitry Zvolskiy from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Citing noise as discrimination, Joyce Cohen, writing for the Washington Post, goes after the restaurant industry. I’m grateful that Ms. Cohen relied on The Quiet Coalition Chair, Dr. Daniel Fink, in this terrific piece, and that she did her homework to get the facts straight.

I hope this kind of reporting will lead to changes in the restaurant industry, which, thanks to Yelp and Zagat and restaurant reviewers at newspapers like the Washington Post, are showing that noise is the number one complaint of restaurant goers. Let’s hope that restaurant owners are finally waking up to the fact that too much noise is actually bad for business.

And congratulations to the Washington Post for taking on this industry and it’s egregious practices! This article has certainly opened up the conversation about restaurant noise and disability.

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

London subway noise is excessive

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in the London Post reports that loud noise on 37 London Underground routes exceeds 85 dB. The World Health Organization recommends only one hour of 85 A-weighted decibel noise exposure to prevent hearing loss. The UK’s Health and Safety Executive recommends posting of warning signs if the noise exceeds 85 decibels. Despite this, Transport for London, the agency that operates London’s subway lines, states that it believes “Health and Safety Executive guidance suggests Tube noise is highly unlikely to cause long-term hearing damage.”

They’re wrong. If one’s commute is 30 minutes or greater each way, the total daily exposure from subway noise alone exceeds the WHO’s safe noise exposure level to prevent hearing loss. And, of course, the Londoner is undoubtedly exposed to other noise sources, such as loud music in restaurants and shops.

When I visit London, I wear earplugs when taking the Tube. You should, too.

Because if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Loud restaurant noise drives away people with auditory disorders

Photo credi: Franklin Heijnen licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article by Marcella Bernanrdo, from the Vancouver CityNews, reports that loud restaurant noise is driving away people with hearing loss, because they can’t understand speech in noisy environments.

Ambient noise is a disability rights issue for those with auditory disorders. Right now, both the Canadian and U.S. economies appear strong and restaurants are busy, so no wonder restaurateurs see no need to make restaurants quieter even though restaurant noise is a major complaint even for those with normal hearing.

Given the lack of economic incentive, it will likely require legal action under disability rights law, or local action by dedicated activists demanding ordinances regulating noise, to make restaurants quieter.

I say there is no time like the present–get online, find your local politician, and ask him or her where they stand on noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.