Author Archive: GMB

One teen’s efforts to update the Americans With Disabilities Act

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I recently wrote about Bryan Pollard’s efforts to bring hyperacusis to the attention of the ENT research community, asking the question, “Can one person make a difference?” The answer clearly was, “Yes.”

Today I’m writing about another single-handed effort to bring about change, also about hyperacusis.

Hyperacusis is a condition that causes a person to be unable to tolerate everyday noise levels without discomfort or pain. And a teen named Jemma-Tiffany with this condition is trying to get another section, Title VI, added to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

As she writes, “[t]his addition to the ADA would Require that all services, facilities, activities either provide a person who has a condition who would otherwise be in pain, ill, or unable to participate due to the sensory and other environmental factors with either an accessible virtual option, modify the sensory or other environmental factors to meet their needs, or provide them with a separate specialized environment to meet their needs.*”*

She has met with one of her senators and will meet the other, and her congressional representative, soon.

Environmental modifications intended specifically to help those with disabilities really make life better for all. Two examples are the ADA lever-style door handle, which makes doors easier for everyone to open, and curb cuts and wheelchair ramps that make life easier for parents pushing a baby stroller, or delivery workers with a cart of packages, or repair technicians with heavy equipment on wheels.

And a more accessible or quieter world mandated by an ADA Title VI will be a better and more enjoyable place for all.

We hope Jemma-Tiffany is successful in her efforts.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

NFL warns teams against “shady noise practices”

NY Giants before COVID  Photo credit: Fabienne Wassermann licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

My family and I, as New York Giant Football fans, have been going to Giant games for many years. But we won’t be going this year because the Giant games will be played without attendees. The New York Giants have enrolled their ticket holders, which I am one, with exclusive benefits such as “live-out-of-market preseason games and replays of every game all season,” but these virtual experiences will not make up for the in-person attendance at the Giant games.

Thus, a recent article about the NFL warning teams about “shady noisy practices” caught my eye. With most of the National Football League’s 32 teams announcing that they will not start the season with fans in attendance, it had been decided to use “artificial crowd noise” to motivate the players. The NFL has cautioned teams, however, that “turning up the volume” at critical third downs for the home teams will not be permitted. Just as I believe in-person attendance brings a special joy to football fans, I wonder if football players will be as inspired with artificial crowd noise as they would be with real roars and shouts of fans in the stadiums.

I would like to address another issue with this article. As a long-term researcher and writer on the adverse effects of noise on health and well-being, I tend to be careful about distinguishing sound from noise. A noise is generally defined as a sound that is harmful to health. Not all sounds are noises. There are sounds that are welcoming and pleasant such as birdsong and raindrops falling on leaves. Music is also delightful, as are the sounds of children laughing on the playground or cheering on the characters at the Macy’s Day Parade. I tend to think of the supportive sounds we hear at baseball and football games as both exalting to players as well as fans. Yes, at times they may be too loud and should be toned down, but for the most part, the cheers at games are so essential to the experience of being a sports fan.

I would like to compliment the engineers in charge of introducing these crowd sounds–I prefer not to call these sounds noise–for not allowing them to be too loud, indicating an awareness of the dangers of loud sounds to our hearing and health. What did puzzle me, however, is that these crowd sounds will also be used in stadiums with fans. Yet, the article cited has noted that the league “will reevaluate that decision as the season progresses.”

This football fan is awaiting what this football season will look and sound like. One thing is for sure—I will be rooting for my home team, the New York Giants.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Twenty Thousand Hertz podcast reaches big audiences with well-told stories about noise

Photo credit: Magda Ehlers from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Sound designer, Dallas Taylor produces a wonderful podcast called Twenty Thousand Hertz that is a joy to listen to. So far he has produced 45 episodes that cover a broad range of “stories behind the world’s most recognizable and interesting sounds.”

Recently he teamed up with TED and Apple Podcasts so now he’s reaching big audiences, which is terrific for those of us who are concerned about the effects of noise on health and environment.

A friend urged me to listen to an episode called “City That Never Sleeps,” in which Taylor interviews a New York City-based writer who discovered that her perpetual anxiety was the result of noise exposure, so she took some simple precautions that others may want to consider. The prodcasts includes a couple of compilations of “nature sounds” that you might want to bookmark. Enjoy!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Grant given to airport to lessen aircraft noise on nearby homes

Photo credit: Cliff licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

I was especially pleased to learn that the Piedmont Triad Airport Authority received a $1.9 million grant from the Department of Transportation to continue its program to lessen the impact of aircraft noise on the homes near the airport. The program to reduce noise impacts at residences was initiated eleven years ago when the FedEx cargo hub joined the airport.

In 2001, I was asked by the law firm representing residents concerned about the negative impacts from the development of the FedEx cargo hub to comment on the Federal Aviation Administration’s Environmental Impact Statement for the proposed runway associated with this hub. My comments explained that the EIS was seriously deficient in that it had minimal analyses of noise impacts on adults and children. Essentially, noise was defined as “an annoyance and a nuisance,” but there already was a growing body of literature that concluded that noise was a hazardous pollutant. The report also merely stated that noise “can disrupt classroom activities in schools,” even though studies had been published showing that noise can impede children’s learning. Finally, sleep was noted as being disrupted by noise when it was already known that loss of sleep may have serious consequences on the individual’s health and well-being.

I had concluded in my analysis of the environmental impact statement that the growing body of literature on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health was largely ignored and the authors of the statement relied on outdated studies and research in preparing the report.

I submitted my report and the hub opened years later in 2009. I now learned that noise mitigation accompanied the opening of the hub and the airport continued to work towards limiting impacts of aircraft noise on individuals living near the airport. I hope my statement in 2001 played a role in the Airport Authority’s recognition that airport-related noise does indeed have deleterious effects on mental and physical health.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Creating a home court advantage–the importance of sound

Photo credit: Daveslyk licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I commented recently on the possible role of crowd noise in creating the home field or home court advantage. In that post, I noted the COVID-19 lockdown with no fans in attendance at sports events had created a natural experiment where the effect of home crowd noise on winning might be able to be evaluated.

But it turns out that at least one of the three leagues I wrote about, the NBA, is artificially creating a home court advantage on the neutral courts in Disney World where the remainder of the NBA season is being played. How are they doing it? By using a “database of music, audio cues and graphics that teams would ordinarily be using in their own arenas.”

So what I had hoped would be a natural experiment may not be such a good experimental design after all.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

German motorcyclists protest against new noise regs

Photo credit: Stephen Elson licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

We wrote recently about Germany’s new regulations concerning motorcycle noise. Today, NPR notes that Germany’s motorcycle enthusiasts are loudly protesting against those regulations.

Just imagine what would happen in the U.S. if the U.S. Department of Transportation tried to enforce their own motorcycle noise regulations. Yes, they exist, but no local, state, or federal authority is enforcing them.

Imagine America’s streets filled with raging, hog-riding Hells Angels and fellow travelers protesting their First Amendment right to “freedom of speech” and their Second Amendment right to protest by carrying guns while invading cities and towns—and holding state houses and town halls hostage.

Invasion of the Goths! MadMax come alive! What a nightmare.

I hope we soon see a massive shift to electric motorcycles as the next generation of millennial riders pushes noisy hog-riding Boomers off the pavement, because it’s going to take a massive demographic shift to end the racket.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Noise exposure leads to hyperglycemia

Photo credit: PhotoMIX Company from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from Diabetes Control discusses a newly published research paper showing that noise exposure was associated with the development of hyperglycemia. Diabetes Control notes that the study is only correlational and does not establish causality.

I have several issues with the paper, starting with the fact that the research was done in 2012 and only analyzed and published now. Occupational noise exposure was also strongly correlated with educational attainment and smoking, so it is possible that those factors and not noise exposure itself was the cause of the hyperglycemia.

But the results are consistent with prior studies done over the last two decades showing correlations between noise exposure and obesity and hyperglycemia in non-occupational settings.

Each similar report is like another tile in a mosaic, providing additional insight into the broader picture of the hazards of noise exposure.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Could a drug being developed to prevent hearing loss help fight COVID-19?

Photo credit: Martin Lopez from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As those who follow my writings know, I’m a big believer in the old public health principle that prevention of disease is almost always better and cheaper than treating it. That principle applies to hearing loss. Preserved normal hearing is much better than the best hearing aid, and costs almost nothing–just avoid loud noise or use hearing protection.

But we follow developments in treating or preventing hearing loss caused by noise exposure. The Holy Grail for this research is a drug that people could take after noise exposure, to prevent any lasting auditory consequences. One of these drugs under development is called Ebsalen.

This new report in the peer-reviewed online journal ScienceAdvances discusses repurposing Ebsalen to fight COVID-19 infection.

We think that may be a better use of Ebsalen than its originally intended use.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

 

 

 

 

Brooklyn Navy Yard gives birth to quiet electric motorcycle

Brooklyn Navy Yard    Photo credit: Dsigman48 licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Founded in 1801, Brooklyn Navy Yard’s sprawling 350-acre site overlooks Manhattan and has seen a lot of innovation—including construction of the Civil War ironclad, USS Monitor https://brooklynnavyyard.org/about/history. At it’s peak during WWII, the yard employed 70,000 people. But ship building at the Yard ended long ago, and now it’s home to hundreds of innovative enterprises including a movie studio.

Among those companies is a young company called Tarform funded by a California venture-capital firm and conceived by a young New Yorker, via Stockholm, Sweden, named Taras Kravtchouk, an industrial designer who is building an absolutely gorgeous, all-electric motorcycle using sustainable materials. Even the motorcycle’s “leather” seat is made from plant materials, not animal hide, and there’s no conventional plastic either—because he’s found substitutes made from biodegradable, natural materials.

Of course, we’re interested because electric motorcycles do not use petroleum and are extremely quiet—as well as impressively powerful. But this bike is also unbelievably beautiful.

As Karavtchouk say, “[b]eauty is its own form of sustainability; no one want to throw away something gorgeous.”

There are a quite a number of electric motorcycles coming onto the market—including several models from American “hog” manufacturer Harley Davidson, whose company executives are aware that their stalwart customers—Boomers—are aging out of the market and GenX and Millennials are much more interested in quiet, powerful, electric rides. But the new Tarform is a real knockout in the looks department:


We have nothing to gain from praising it but just can’t pass up the opportunity to point it out.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.