Design

Dutch “singing road” drives locals nuts

Imagine the aural counterpart to this. Photo credit: Steven Lek licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Here is an amusing article about a singing road that bothered people living nearby and eventually was made to sound like a normal road.

Road traffic noise is a major contributor to noise pollution, obviously affecting those living closest to the road or highway.

Let’s hope that other cities and towns learn from the Dutch experience: people want quiet highways, not noisy ones.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Color us surprised!

Turns out that people like to have private phone conversations in private spaces. Go figure! The New York Times looks at this phenomenon in a piece titled: Dial P for Privacy: The Phone Booth Is Back.

Naturally the phone booths highlighted in the article aren’t on the street. Rather, they are expensive ($3995 and higher) add-ons companies have had to squeeze into their open plan office spaces for those times that co-workers want less “collaboration” and more privacy. Something that used to be accommodated with these things called offices.

If phone booths are back, might offices be around the corner? [Not holding our breath.]

Thanks to Jeanine Botta for the link.

 

Noisy vacuum cleaners are still a problem in the EU

Photo credit: Phonical licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Despite European Union regulations about vacuum cleaner noise, this report documents that noisy vacuum cleaners are still a problem there.

As the Volkswagen diesel pollution fiasco shows, manufacturers will flout laws meant to protect the public until regulators act.

At least Europe has laws protecting the public from appliance noise. The U.S. has these laws on the books, but they have not been enforced since the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Noise Abatement and Control was defunded during the Reagan years.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Or you could just provide your employees a damn office

 

Here’s a cheaper alternative.  You’re welcome.    Photo credit: Mechatronics Guy licensed under CC BY 2.0

Do you work in a noisy open plan office? Need to make a private phone call? No worries, you can ring in privacy with the phone booth (reads the sponsored content).

And why not? With open plan offices still around, some accommodation has to be made when an employee needs to speak to her doctor or his spouse or to do their job.  But rather than re-evaluate the open floor plan and it’s inappropriateness for many jobs, do spend money on an ugly little space with, no doubt, a big price tag.

One hopes that after weighing the cost of providing overly designed quiet spaces coupled with lost productivity due to noise and distraction the C-suite geniuses will eventually discover the benefits of providing the worker bees a distraction-free office to do their damn job.

Your outer ears are important to hearing, too

Photo credit: Travis Isaacs licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Those of us concerned about noise and hearing focus on noise damaging the inner ear and associated nerve structures, but the outer ear has an important role to play in hearing. It collects sound waves and directs them to the external auditory canal, but it also does more.

This report in the Science section of the New York Times discusses how the shape of the external ear helps humans determine exactly where a sound came from.

We can protect our hearing either by covering the pinna–the part of the external ear that we see–with ear muff hearing protection, or inserting ear plugs into the other part of the external ear, the external auditory canal. What’s important is to choose a method to protect your hearing and stick with it.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.