Disorderly Sound

It’s going to be a long summer

You’re finally settled into your new place! And then you learn that your neighbor is a DJ…

New rules limit NYPD’s ability to address noise complaints. Just in time for the summer, New York City police “will no longer be allowed to go onto private property and remove sound equipment when responding to noise complaints.”  The reason, reports the NY Daily News, is that a new directive provides that “’warrantless entry’…is not authorized solely for the purpose of abating noise conditions.” Under the directive, if police are not given permission to enter an address for which a noise complaint has been made, “the officers ‘may return on the following day and issue summonses as appropriate.’”

While we understand–and applaud–the police department’s concern about officers engaging in warrantless entries, providing that officers “may return the following day” (unlikely) to issue a summons seems like a recipe for disaster: take one obnoxious and indifferent neighbor, add in too much noise, stir in a bucket full of frayed nerves, and shake vigorously. If the NYPD wants to stop warrantless entries for noise complaints while maintaining the peace, maybe it’s time to extend night court hours beyond 1:00 a.m. and allow officers to get a timely summons.

 

Because the world isn’t noisy enough, someone created fidget spinners

Photo credit: Charmingco licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

But no worries, reason prevails: Fidget spinners banned from schools for making too much noise. For the uninitiated, a fidget spinner is a “palm-sized spinner containing ball bearings which can be flicked and spun around.” And why do they exist (other than to torment us)?  Actually, they were designed to help students with ADHD and autism and it’s thought that they help with concentration, but they became “a fad after YouTube bloggers gathered millions of views by performing tricks with them.”  So students who were playing with fidget spinners for fun and not to help them concentrate were interfering with students trying to concentrate.  While the linked story was about a ban at a UK school, you’ll be glad to know that fidget spinners are also banned in 32% of the largest high schools in the U.S. So far.

Time to invest in hearing aid companies

Photo credit: Chris Harte licensed under CC BY 2.0

Why? Because this sort of thing is still being encouraged: Toronto Raptors’ coach “wants more crowd noise at home.” Yes, Coach Dwane Casey asked Raptor fans “to turn up the volume and match the noisy support generated in Milwaukee by the leather-lunged Bucks crowd.” A sentence that has deep meaning for some. As for us, our interpretation is that either the coach really believes that a stadium full of screamers makes a difference or he is disingenuously attempting to engage fans at whatever cost, including their hearing. Whatever the reason the end result is painfully loud noise that will leave a lasting mark on everyone who experiences it.

So follow our lead–skip the game and check this out instead: Top 6 hearing aid manufacturers.

 

What can you do about noisy neighbors?

Photo credit: Denise Cheng licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Derby Telegraph offers some guidance for dealing with the neighbor in love with his leaf blower or outdoor audio system. While some of the suggestions may not translate well–the Derby Telegraph is a UK newspaper–some will. Namely, the first suggestion is dead on, unless, that is, you have reason to know that your neighbor is unstable or obnoxious on purpose:

[T]he first thing you should always do is speak to the person causing the noise. Most of the time they don’t realise they are causing a nuisance and are usually happy to change what they are doing.

If reason does not prevail, the article provides a link to the Derby City Council website and walks the reader through the process of filing a noise complaint online. We have some catching up to do in the U.S., but there are communities with mechanisms to complain about noise, like New York City’s 311 system. But if there isn’t a reasonable way to file a complaint where you live, find out who represents your ward or neighborhood and ask him or her to propose one. There should be a process to address noise and other complaints that comes between constituents seething in impotent rage and calling the cops as a first measure.

And we don’t know about you, but we learned one very interesting fact from this article: Germany has “strict ‘quiet hours’…between 8pm and 7am and all day Sundays and holidays.” Then again, we shouldn’t be surprised, as “Germany’s love of silence led to the first earplug.”

Man takes revenge on noisy neighbors

Buy it now at Taobao.com

How?  By buying a ‘building shaker’ and leaving it on all weekend. Shanghaist reports that a Xi’an resident named Zhao was having problems with his upstairs neighbors whose little boy was jumping and running and disturbing his rest. Zhao complained to building management and tried to talk to the neighbors about the problem but to no avail, so he resorted to Plan B: Operation Self-Help. Long and short, Zhao “went online and bought a ‘building shaker’ for 400 yuan [Ed.: about $58], looking to give the noisy neighbors a taste of their own medicine.” He turned the building shaker on one Friday evening and then left his apartment for the weekend.

The article makes it clear that Zhao got his neighbors’ attention. In fact, they complained that the constant thumping was “driving them insane.”  When he returned to his apartment,  police officers asked Zhao to turn the building shaker off. Shanghaist states that it is not known whether Zhao was punished for his “act of revenge.”

While we would not suggest this sort of thing, and certainly not as a first step in addressing a noise complaint, we’re guessing that Zhao’s neighbors were a bit more mindful after that weekend. Just saying.

The Brits sure take their noise complaints seriously, Part II:

It was fun until the fuzz took his music away.

Loud music costs noisy neighbour £1.7k and his sound systems. The defendant had been warned on many occasions and served a noise abatement notice, but he would not stop. Until, that is, the law took away his sound system–and it’s not coming back.

A magistrate gave the defendant “a two year conditional discharge and ordered him to pay full costs to the council of £1754.50, plus a £20 victim surcharge,” and “also agreed that the sound systems, DVD player and CDs would be forfeited and not returned.” £1754.50 is approximately $2187.24, a not insignificant amount.

It may seem harsh, but as the council chair of the environment, transport, and sustainability committee stated: “Like all anti-social behaviour, noise nuisance can cause a great deal of distress.”  That is a fact the defendant will never forget (one hopes).

Noise isn’t just a city problem

On Banning Leaf Blowers.” Kaysen writes that “New Yorkers who leave the city for the suburbs often do so for three reasons: schools, space and silence.” But she adds that “silence, it turns out, can be a problem.” Why? Because while “suburban streets are certainly free of blaring horns, wailing sirens and, sometimes, even people…come springtime, they vibrate with the hum of lawn mowers, edgers, trimmers and leaf blowers; the accompanying noise continues until the last leaves fall from the trees in early December.”

So what can suburbanites do to quell the din?  Kaysen tells us that the Township of Maplewood, New Jersey is considering a ban on the noisiest and most noxious of a landscaper’s tools: leaf blowers. The township’s proposed ordinance prohibits commercial use of blowers from May 15 through September 30, and imposes strict limits as to use for the rest of the year. The ordinance also imposes fines, starting at $500 for the first offense.

The problem with leaf blowers is twofold. As Jamie Banks, the founder of Quiet Communities, a group that advocates quieter lawn maintenance equipment, states: “[I]t’s not just the noise. It’s the pollution.”  Kaysen adds that:

Most landscapers use leaf blowers with two-stroke engines, which are light enough to carry but produce significant exhaust and noise. The gas and oil mix together, and about a third of it does not combust. As a result, pollutants that have been linked to cancers, heart disease, asthma and other serious ailments escape into the air.

Despite there being alternatives–say, a rake?–there is pushback, of course. Residents who hate noise are facing off with residents who feel the ordinance will “hamstrung their gardeners, leaving their yards looking unkempt, with grass suffocating beneath piles of clippings.”  And landscapers insist that leaf blowers are essential, claiming that “when used properly, is not a nuisance.”  Used properly means at half speed, “which is significantly lower in noise volume, they’re much more efficient,” said Paul Mendelsohn, vice president of government relations for the National Association of Landscape Professionals.  Which makes us wonder why full speed is even an option.

Click the first link to read the entire piece.  It is well worth your time, particularly the bit about local hero Fred Chichester, 79, of Montclair, who, when he hears a leaf blower nearby, “gets into his 1998 Ford Escort wagon, one of his seven cars, and looks for the culprits, suing them in municipal court for violating the ban.” Fred then takes the landscapers to court, “about 20 times over the years.” And he usually wins.

 

What’s the one thing never mentioned when discussing drone delivery?

 

Imagine 100 of these, overhead, constantly

Dyllan Furness, Digital Trends, writes about the U.S. military’s successful launch of “one of the world’s largest micro-drone swarms” in October in a piece titled, “The sound of 103 micro drones launched from an F/A-18 will give you nightmares.” Click the link to the piece and hit play on the video at the top of the page. The micro-drones can be heard starting at 2 minutes, 17 seconds.

We’re not sure if the sound will give you nightmares–although it is unnerving–but it did make us wonder about what would happen to our soundscape should Amazon and others succeed in convincing governments that drone delivery is a great idea. What you hear on the video is 103 micro-drones–small drones “with a wingspan under 12 inches.”  Now imagine a battalion of full-size, package-wielding delivery drones flying above your head. Just saying.