Health and Noise

Can a drug that repairs DNA prevent noise-induced hearing loss?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This press release from Northern Arizona University discusses a professor’s research on a new drug to see if it can prevent noise-induced hearing loss. Noise causes the production of reactive oxygen species in the cochlea, damaging delicate hair cells. The new drug, derived from a plant found in the Amazon, helps repair DNA and that might help prevent noise-induced hearing loss.

I’m always puzzled, though, that in the U.S. we try to find “a pill for every ill,” rather than focusing on preventing disease.

People want a pill to help them lose weight, rather than eating right and exercising.

They want creams to reduce wrinkles and age spots, rather than avoiding the sun.

And they want a pill to prevent hearing loss.

The professor doing the research, O’neil Guthrie, states “[e]ven after more than 100 years of research on hearing loss, there is still no widely accepted biomedical treatment or prevention.” I would have to disagree with him. I’m not sure what he means by a “biomedical treatment or prevention,” but avoiding loud noise, or using hearing protection, certainly prevents noise-induced hearing loss. And that’s what I recommend.

Because if something sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft on the Soundproofist podcast

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition’s Arline Bronzaft, PhD, has been interviewed for the Soundproofist site, a site that provides interviews with individuals speaking about the welcoming sounds in our environment as well as the dangers of noise.

In this interview Dr. Bronzaft notes that the literature supporting the link between adverse impacts of noise on health and well-being has not resulted in legislation adequate to protect people from the dangers of noise. Her grandson, Matt Santoro, discusses how aircraft noise affects him at his home in Queens, New York, and how aircraft noise intruded  his classroom when he was in middle school.

For those like me, who prefer to get their information by reading rather than by listening to a podcast, a transcript of that podcast is also available at that site.

In either format, it’s worth spending the time to learn what Arline has to say about the dangers of noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Prof. Rick Neitzel on Apple-backed research, restaurant noise

Photo credit: m01229 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Watch these two videos with our Quiet Coalition colleague, Professor Rick Neitzel, University of Michigan. In one video, he’s does some interesting noise-exposure work with a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reporter in a news segment that aired recently:

The loudest sounds to which this reporter was exposed over the course of a full day were in restaurants during lunch and dinner! It certainly looks like the restaurant noise problem is gaining public attention.

In the other video, he’s announcing a very exciting new research project for which he’s received funding from Apple:

This study will use Apple’s new sound-exposure app on the iWatch & iPhone.

Congratulations, Prof. Neitzel!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Sleep may be good for your salary

Photo credit: Ivan Oboleninov from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This fascinating article in The Ne York Times reports on a new study by economists showing that those who sleep more have higher salaries. The study correlated incomes with the earlier sunset times in the eastern end of a time zone compared to the western end, e.g., Boston, Massachusetts vs. Ann Arbor, Michigan, where there’s about a 50 minute difference between sunset times.

I wonder if another factor might be at work. Those who earn more can afford to live in quieter neighborhoods. Those who earn less can’t afford to do that. In fact, a study done by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, showed that noise pollution was worse in poor and minority communities.

Might the researchers have mixed up cause and effect? Probably not, because according to the report they looked at average incomes in the different areas in the same time zone.

But one does have to wonder.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Noise disrupts sleep. Could this be linked to Alzheimer’s?

Photo credit: Alyssa L. Miller licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The most common definition of noise is “noise is unwanted sound.” We at The Quiet Coalition recently came up with a new definition: noise is unwanted and/or harmful sound. The specific evidence-based sound levels associated with adverse health and public health hazards are summarized in my article in Acoustics Today, “Ambient Noise Is ‘The New Secondhand Smoke.'”

Sounds as low as 30-35 A-weighted decibels* can disrupt sleep. Uninterrupted sleep is important for both daily function and health. Nighttime noise is increasing, caused by aircraft noise, road traffic noise, emergency vehicle sirens, horn-based alerts, and sounds from clubs, bars, and concerts, with the specific noise source(s) depending on where people live.

It has been known since 2013 that sleep is necessary for cellular cleaning functions in the brain. A new study, reported by NPR, extends this research to Alzheimer’s disease. It has been known for some time that poor sleep is associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and patients with Alzheimer’s disease don’t sleep well. The new study shows that there are waves of cerebrospinal fluid occurring every 20 seconds during sleep, preceded by electrical activity. The electrical waves appear as slow waves on an EEG. Those with Alzheimer’s disease have fewer slow waves on their EEGs.

I have only read the NPR report, not the underlying article in Science, and I’m not 100% sure the cause-effect relationship between sleep disruption and Alzheimer’s has been clearly established. Which really came first, the sleep problems or the Alzheimer’s disease? Nonetheless, the study underscores the importance of a good night’s sleep.

Noise pollution is a public health problem. And one wonders if the increase in Alzheimer’s disease is due in part to increased nighttime noise levels.

*A-weighting adjusts sound measurements to reflect the frequencies heard in human speech.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

A comic book about noise? Yes!

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Our contacts at the National Center for Environmental Health have let us know that their new educational comic book, “How Loud Is Too Loud?,” is now available online.

We are assisting in the dissemination of this valuable information, so that teachers, parents, grandparents, and friends of children of comic book reading age can help children learn about the dangers of noise.

Thanks to the folks at CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health for everything they are doing to help educate the public about the dangers of noise for hearing.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The Quiet Coalition co-founders speaking at APHA

Photo credit: Bruce Emmerling from Pixabay

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition will be well-represented at the American Public Health Association meeting in Philadelphia, November 2-6, 2019. Jamie Banks, MS, PhD, and Arline Bronzaft, PhD, will be speaking on a session on noise and health, on November 4 at 8:30 a.m.

The session, titled “Environmental Noise: The New Secondhand Smoke,” will also feature Mathias Basner, MD PhD MSc, and Jennifer Deal, PhD.  It will be moderated by Leon Vinci, PhD.

Here is a link to the press release about this important session.https://www.quietcommunities.org/environmental-noise-the-new-secondhand-smoke-at-apha-annual-conference/
Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

As public health concern grows, Pew looks at noise pollution

Photo credit: Mike Seyfang licensed under CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Pew Trusts—an influential non-profit foundation—is a major player in the media world, so we’re thrilled that two of their writers have recently published articles about noise pollution citing as primary sources several of The Quiet Coalition’s founders, friends, and colleagues.

Pew’s coverage is encouraging, because media attention stimulates awareness of the noise problem that has only grown worse from decades of neglect in this country.

Awareness has also helped stimulate a surge of private investment in America over the past three years in research and development related to hearing loss—with noise being a principle cause of hearing loss. One Boston-area company raised a whopping $228 million dollars in venture financing for a treatment for hearing loss and earlier this month filed for an IPO. That’s a huge change for a sector that has been ignored for several decades.

It’s important to acknowledge and honor the contribution of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for spurring this interest in noise and its effect on health starting in February 2017, when they began publishing on this subject.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Another treatment for tinnitus

Photo credit: Dr. Craig Hacking and Prof Frank Gaillard licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from the University of California San Francisco discusses a Phase 1 trial of deep brain stimulation for tinnitus. A Phase 1 trial is a preliminary trial to see how a new treatment works. Then there are Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials.

Most treatments do not pass all the hurdles to be approved for regular use. And deep brain stimulation is expensive and risky.

By comparison, prevention of most forms of tinnitus is cheap, easy, and safe: avoid head trauma and noise exposure and one is unlikely to develop tinnitus.

That sounds like a much better idea than deep brain stimulation to me.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Venture money surges into hearing health treatments

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I’ve been watching Dr. Charles Liberman’s company, Frequency Therapeutics, for several years. He’s the physician-researcher who runs Harvard’s Lauer Tinnitus Research Center in Boston and who has published papers starting in 2009 about “hidden hearing loss,” papers that broke open the Congressional log-jam that prevented significant funding going into hearing disorders. His company has raised an eye-popping $228 million in venture capital–that’s a LOT for an early-stage company–and now they’ve gotten approval from the Food and Drug Administration to fast-track trials of their first product.

But Frequency Therapeutics isn’t the only company in this space. I recently saw information at an investor conference showing that another half dozen companies have also raised significant amounts of venture capital for hearing-disorder treatments. Collectively, they’ve raised over a quarter of a billion dollars! That’s extraordinary progress for a long overlooked sector where nothing seemed to happen for decades and where the only treatment option for decades were extraordinarily expensive hearing aids from a handful of powerful companies charging inflated prices no one could afford.

Now there’s an active market and venture capitalists are diving in! That is a real sign of progress!

Thanks are due to the President’s Council of Advisers on Science and Technology that in 2016 published a report on the noise-induced hearing loss market, and to the National Academy of Medicine report on hearing loss in America that issued a few months later. Those two reports also led to the bi-partisan Warren-Grassley OTC Hearing Aid Act that President Trump signed into law in 2018 and that goes in to effect in January 2020. That act, in turn, has created a surge of investment in personal sound amplification products, or PSAPs, which are high-tech ‘hearing aids’ you’ll soon be able to buy from your local drug store for 1/10th the price of conventional hearing aids.

Change is here!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.