Hearables

Researchers confirm cheaper hearables work as well as hearing aids

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Several Johns Hopkins researchers reported some research in the Journal of the American Medical Association that tested the notion that a cheap ($200-$400) unregulated “hearable” (also known as a personal sound amplification product or PSAP) may be a convenient and inexpensive alternative to a hearing aid.

The researchers tested a handful of the new hearable products just coming on the market and, sure enough, they perform as well as, or nearly as well as, expensive ($2000-$5000 per ear) hearing aids made by the “Big Six.” The Big Six are six companies that have controlled the hearing aid industry; their products are regulated in the U.S. by the Food and Drug Administration.

Recently legislation passed by Congress and signed into law just before the August recess, about which we have written earlier, requires the FDA to de-regulate, i.e. to take a hands-off approach to this new class of high-tech hearing devices. As a result, these new products can be sold over the counter, without a prescription.

Will you need to take them to an audiologist to get them fitted? Certainly you may choose to do so, and that may be the best option, particularly if you are concerned that improper use might endanger your hearing. But with a conventional hearing aid, patients were required to pay professional fees to an audiologist for fittings, etc., resulting in a bundled price that made the hearing aids unobtainable for many people who needed them. You can certainly expect to read articles claiming that these new devices pose a danger. Henceforth, it’s up to the consumer to decide—as he or she already does with regard to many other healthcare products, including over-the-counter drugs that formerly required a doctor’s prescription.

We say caveat emptor (buyer beware), but welcome these new products that cost 1/10th the price of conventional hearing aids. They are suitably priced to be able to meet the needs of 48 million Americans with noise-induced hearing loss, many of whom cannot afford the $4000 to $10,000 price tag for conventional hearing aids. Voters seem to want de-regulation—this is it!

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

 

New federal law deregulates and disrupts hearing aid market

Photo of Here One wireless smart earbuds courtesy of Doppler Labs

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Who says this Congress can’t get anything done? Last week huge news appeared for 48 million Americans with hearing disorders, but the media barely noticed::

A new bipartisan law, the “Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017,” will deregulate the hearing aid market, dramatically lowering costs for consumers and releasing a surge of new technologies that will be sold over the counter, without a prescription. Yes, there will be losers as well as winners, but that’s the nature of change….

The new law responds to two federally sponsored reports issued last year (under the Obama Administration). The first report came from the President’s Council of Advisers on Science and Technology. The second was from the National Academy of Medicine. Passed the day before Congress adjourned, the new law creates opportunities for new technology innovators, eliminates the need to get a prescription, and dramatically cuts the cost by allowing substitutes, called “hearables” and “PSAPs” (Personal Sound Amplification Products), to be sold “over the counter.” The goal? a more efficient market that meets the needs of consumers.

As Noah Kraft, co-founder and CEO of Doppler Labs said, “[t]his industry is going to be completely disrupted. The question is by who?”

We have reported about this on several occasions over the past year, but the market disruption is getting underway much sooner that we anticipated thanks to quick action in the House of Representatives and the Senate, action that has emboldened nearly two dozen new entrants to enter the market ahead of schedule.

Who gains? 48 million Americans with incurable noise-induced hearing loss and millions more who are at risk from noise exposure. Who loses? The Big Six  who have dominated the hearing aid market for decades along with approximately 14,000 audiologists, the medical specialists whose services were previously required by the FDA to dispense and “fit” hearing aids to patients. The new Warren-Grassley OTC Act stipulates that the FDA must create a new category for “over-the-counter” hearing assistive devices and let them be sold freely, without intervention.

It’s no secret that the current Congress and the White House crave deregulation. Is deregulation potentially dangerous? Sure, but this is one instance where consumers will clearly benefit. Until now, hearing aids could cost you between $2,500 and $5,000 per ear, so $5,000 to $10,000 total. No wonder so few people have hearing aids—they weren’t covered by insurance or Medicare/Medicaid, so who could afford them? But now prices will drop to 1/10th of that—about $300 to $350 a pair–so lack of insurance coverage is less of a barrier.

We say thanks to the laudable bi-partisan cooperation between Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA) for getting this done at a time when Washington seems mired in dysfunction.

What’s the downside of this deregulatory innovation? There are many unknowns, so caveat emptor (buyer beware) and stay tuned…. But for now, it’s “Hip Hip Hooray”—or should we say, “Hear Here”!

P.S.: Our chair, Daniel Fink, MD, cautions that the real solution to the epidemic of hearing disorders in America is NOT more affordable hearing aids, but rather, a badly needed and long-awaited public health effort to prevent hearing loss—and we wholeheartedly agree with him. Prevention can be encouraged by three means:

  1. Educating people about the dangers of prolonged exposure to noise above 70 dB (permanent hearing damage occurs at levels much lower than currently recognized);
  2. Resurrecting federal efforts to reduce noise (as is being done in Europe and Asia already, where noise is recognized as a public health hazard) from obvious sources like planes, trains, trucks, consumer appliances, construction and outdoor maintenance equipment, etc.; and
  3. Educating companies in industries like aircraft manufacturing, car and truck manufacturing, mining, construction, HVAC, and appliance manufacturing, etc. that noise is harmful to public health.

Prevention can be done: currently, the European Union regulates noise emissions from 50 classes of products. According to Dr. Fink, “a hearable or PSAP is a poor substitute for well-preserved normal hearing; it’s far better to avoid loud noise or to wear earplugs!”

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

PSAPs appear to work (but preventing hearing loss is better)

Photo credit: Hadley Paul Garland licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Personal sound amplification products (PSAPs) appear to work. What is a PSAP? It’s really a hearing aid but it’s called a PSAP to avoid federal and state regulations. PSAPs can be sold directly to consumers without a physician or audiologist evaluation, and they are much cheaper than conventional hearing aids–in the range of $350 a pair instead of $3000 apiece.

This Research Letter in a recent issue of JAMA compared five PSAPs with a conventional hearing aid. The Johns Hopkins research team reported that some of the PSAPs worked quite well. Four of the PSAPs are traditional “behind the ear” devices that look like cheaper, less well made versions of traditional hearing aids, but one, the Etymotic Bean, might be placed into the newer category of “hearables” that are marketed as “smart earbuds.”

Why is this report important? PSAPs were strongly recommended by two recent expert federal reports (a report from the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology in October 2015​ and a report from the National Academy of Medicine) as a solution–perhaps the solution–to the nation’s epidemic of hearing loss in older Americans.

To some they are the holy grail for hearing loss, enabling all to hear well without spending thousands of dollars. To others, especially audiologists and hearing aid dispensers, they are an existential threat. If grandma and grandpa can buy much cheaper hearing aids on their own from Amazon or Costco, why see an audiologist or hearing aid dispenser? Just buy your PSAPs online or at your nearby big box store.

Unfortunately, neither federal report mentioned the prevention as a solution for hearing loss. As I said in my presentation at the 12th Congress of the International Commission on the Biological Effects of Noise in Zurich on June 20, 2017, significant hearing loss is probably not part of normal aging but is noise-induced hearing loss caused by a lifetime of excessive noise exposure.

The inconvenient truth about hearing aids is that they don’t work very well at helping users understand speech in normal, everyday situations. For obvious reasons, there is little peer-reviewed research on this topic in the audiology literature, but two studies report approximately 40% non-usage rates. There is no reason to expect–especially without any training and teaching by an audiologist–that PSAP users will have any greater success.

Needing hearing aids or PSAPs in old age to treat hearing loss is not normal, just as needing complete dentures in old age because of tooth loss from poor dental care is not normal. Both are the only remedies available when we have failed to protect what Mother Nature gave us. But it’s much better to protect your ears and preserve your hearing than to use even the best hearing aid or the less costly PSAP alternatives.

The time to start protecting your ears is now! If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud. Avoid loud noise, and if you can’t avoid it, wear hearing protection.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Scientists discover that eardrums move in sync with eyes

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Aylin Woodward, New Scientist, reports on new research that shows that our eardrums appear to move to shift our hearing in the same direction that our eyes are looking. Jennifer Groh, the lead researcher, believes “that before actual eye movement occurs, the brain sends a signal to the ear to say ‘I have commanded the eyes to move 12 degrees to the right’.” Why? She opines that “[t]he eardrum movements that follow the change in focus may prepare our ears to hear sounds from a particular direction,” noting that one reason why the eyes and ears move together may be to help “the brain make sense of what we see and hear.”

My guess is that for our primate ancestors, and then for primitive humans, there was a survival advantage to hearing sound from something that had been seen. Friend or foe? Food or predator? It will be interesting to see where this research leads, particularly as Woodward writes that the study might help develop better hearing aids, “which must locate where sounds are coming from to work well.”

Research is always good. That’s how we learn about how the world works. But we don’t need any more research to know that noise is a health and public health hazard, and that we need to press our elected officials to make the world quieter now.

Because no matter how good the technology becomes, preserved normal hearing is far better than any hearing aid. And far cheaper, too.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

iBuds? Apple shows its hand in the “hearables” space

Photo credit: Bjorn Knetsch licensed under CC BY 2.0

By David Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This recent piece by Steven Levy in Wired suggests what Apple (and others) are up to in the hearables market. Levy tells us that Apple is collaborating with Cochlear to provide solutions for people with profound hearing loss. This should excite anyone concerned about the epidemic of hearing loss in America, because it suggests that hearing health has gained enough attention that corporate America is applying resources to the problem and turning it into a “technological opportunity.”

If you’ve been following outcomes from the two federal reports last year (from the Presidents Council of Advisers on Science and Technology, and the National Academy of Medicine) and the resulting bi-partisan Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 (OCHA) approved by the Senate last week (earlier approved by the House), you know something’s up in the hearing health sector. And with the passage of OCHA last week, hearing health, an issue that has languished in the shadows for lack of funding for over three decades is suddenly center-stage again after three decades of neglect.

The Wired article, coupled with the legislative success in the Senate, demonstrate that hearing health is finally starting to get the attention it deserves. That Apple is trying to gain a foothold in this world shows that tech companies smell an opportunity. And the passage of OCHA clearly establishes that hearing loss is a nonpartisan issue important to both republicans and democrats, because despite the state of affairs in DC today it’s an issue on which the nation can begin to make progress even if the rest of the legislative agenda is on hold!

David Sykes chairs/co-chairs four national professional groups in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, ANSI S12 WG44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group. He is also a board member of the American Tinnitus Association, co-founder of the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), and a contributor to “Technology for a Quieter America” (2011, National Academy of Engineering). A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

New hearing aid filters out noise (but not as well as your own ears and brain)

Photo credit: Steve Johnson licensed under CC by 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Engineers at Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science have made an advance in hearing aid design that reportedly will allow users to better understand speech in noisy environments by combining auditory and neurological signal processing techniques. No doubt the millions of people who suffer with hearing loss appreciate the efforts to tackle this health issue. But why do we see article after article focusing on funding for treatments or cures of hearing loss but nothing about funding hearing loss prevention?

We think the better option is to prevent noise-induced hearing loss by avoiding exposure to loud noise. The human ear and brain are designed to process incoming sound well and probably do this better than any electronic gizmo can. Research shows that noise damages not just the ear but directly damages the brain as well, at least in animal models.

And for those who already have hearing loss–and even for those who don’t–quieter indoor and outdoor environments will allow everyone to converse more easily. The techniques for creating indoor quiet are well known: eliminate noise sources if possible, isolate noise sources that can’t be eliminated, use sound absorbing materials on floors, walls, ceilings, and furniture, and use architectural features to break up reflected sound waves. And while some may balk at the cost of implementing these techniques, there is one no cost option everyone can use: turn down the volume of amplified sound from rock concert levels to hearing preservation levels!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

How research, technology, and finance are fueling the new world of hearables

Copyright 2016 www.hearable.world

By David Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

“For the last 40 years, there’s been very little movement, if any at all on [hearing loss]… and there [are] fundamental regulatory forces in place here that are subject to inertia. …. Now, just literally within the last year, …we’ve seen more movement on this issue than essentially in the last 50 years of U.S. history.”

–Frank Lin, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Otolaryngology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (July 2016)

In the U.S. we grew accustomed to noise and noise-induced hearing loss being ignored. Nothing much happened for three and a half decades after 1981 when, for political reasons, noise and its effects became verboten—serious people wouldn’t talk about it and researchers couldn’t find money to explore it. But lately, what venture capitalists call a “convergence” has occurred—a confluence of research, technology development, and novel sources of financial support (i.e., crowdfunding). And this convergence is creating a surge of interest in this long-ignored subject.

What is going on? Why are some of us so excited about this? Where are we headed? How does this help (or hurt) people who are concerned with the need to control noise, peoples’ exposure to noise, and people who suffer from hearing disorders like tinnitus, hyperacusis, and misophonia? If you follow the writing of The Quiet Coalition’s chairman, Daniel Fink, MD, you may recall that he first wrote about this subject last May. In short, personal sound amplification products (PSAPs) are a positive, exciting step in the right direction. But they will not and cannot solve the larger problem of noise and noise-induced hearing loss in America.

First: What’s going on?

Did it start with research? In 2009, two researchers at Harvard’s Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Charles Liberman, PhD, and Sharon Kujawa, PhD, published a paper revealing that “synaptopathy”, i.e., permanent nerve damage to the nerves that connect the ears to the brain, actually happened at lower noise levels than previously assumed and in the neurological circuits that can’t be seen in an audiological exam (audiologists can only see the pinna, the external auditory canal and the tympanic membrane—after that all has been a big mystery).

As a result, something called “hidden hearing loss” suddenly caught the attention of the policy makers who funded the research. Abruptly, the idea that noise caused only “temporary” damage, i.e., that the ear could recover from what has for decades been called a “Temporary Threshold Shift,” appeared to be really wrong. Hearing damage to nerves is always permanent and, at least until cures are found, irreparable. This caused a shift toward neuroscience research and toward the search for potential cures in partnership with the drug industry.

Did it start with technology innovators? Sony’s phenomenally successful Walkman (launched in 1977, forty years ago) started it, but then Apple’s iPod caused an explosion in the use of “earbuds” for “personal listening.” These wired earbuds were incredibly popular but always troublesome to wear because of the wires, so R&D types began trying to figure out how to get rid of the wires. Then “wireless” arrived. Called “Bluetooth,” it was developed in Sweden (the name “Bluetooth” is a tribute to the ancient King Harald Bluetooth of Denmark who unified parts of Scandinavia). But even wireless earbuds were essentially “dumb” speakers. Eventually, other restless R&D types began exploring what else, with increasingly miniaturized circuit designs, those wireless earbuds could do for you if you thought about the ear as a “portal” for transmitting information to the brain. From that work was born the idea of the PSAP.

But how did an idea turn into a blossoming industry called “wearables” or “hearables” in which at least seventeen companies are now scrambling for your attention? The answer? Money.

Did it start with the idea of “crowdsourcing” money to develop next-generation, smart “earbuds”? Look closely at the chart above and you’ll see that many pioneering PSAP companies currently vying for your attention are financed by “crowdsourcing” campaigns (e.g., Kickstarter and others). Another funding approach now available to companies in this emerging sector is the new SEC-approved “equity crowdsourcing” venture-finance companies, which have only been able to operate since late 2016 in the USA (earlier elsewhere). In other words, now there are whole new ways to start and fund a tech company that do not rely on traditional venture capitalists—those people who traditionally funded lots of other tech companies, but who have had, until now, little interest in hearing technologies because the hearing technology market has been stuck in a rut for three and a half decades.

In truth, all three of these phenomena—research, technology innovation, and capital–occurred independently. But now they have converged and are beginning to affect—and disrupt—existing markets, such as the market for hearing aids.  Hearing aids are over-priced, limited production devices generally aimed at older people and manufactured by a group of six companies (“the cartel” or “The Big Six”) who dominate the industry and make 98% of the world’s hearing aids—in other words, this is a market ripe for disruption.

Now add a fourth catalyst: Regulatory change. Eleven months ago (June 2016), the National Academy of Medicine published a significant report about the emerging, disruptive technology of PSAPs and attempted to warn audiologists, hearing aid manufacturers, and others who have been comfortably ensconced in this stable, profitable but uninteresting market that things are about to change. Then, a few months later two U.S. Senators introduced a bi-partisan bill intended to accelerate transformation of this market. It’s called “The Over-The-Counter Hearing Aid Act,” and it was introduced by Senators Warren (D-MA) and Grassley (R-IA). This act specifically seeks to streamline the market for “hearables”/PSAPs by exempting them from FDA regulation and enabling them to be sold direct to consumers, i.e., “over the counter,” without medical intervention.

But wait, what does this story have to do with our interest in noise control, in ending harmful exposure to noise, in your and your family’s hearing health? Do these new PSAP devices provide some relief for people who already suffer from noise-induced hearing loss? Can they prevent further damage from exposure?

Answer: A big maybe.

Keep in mind that the first word in PSAP is “personal”—these devices only address your noise problem, they don’t solve the noise problem for anyone else. If you travel to work on a noisy subway system, it’s possible some of these PSAP devices may provide you with some relief in the form of an active noise cancellation feature. If you can’t understand conversation in a noisy restaurant, some of the PSAP devices may be able to help you screen out background cacophony and focus on the person who’s speaking to you. In short, PSAPs include a wide array of features that might interest you. They are marketed as wireless earbuds that allow you to optimize “the way you hear the world,” and not as hearing aids, because they cannot be advertised as “hearing aids”—the U.S. Food and Drug Administration prohibits that. Only a “hearing aid” from one of “The Big Six” can be sold as a “hearing aid”—and only those six companies worldwide make devices that are labeled that way.

So “Caveat Emptor” (buyer beware) if you’re interested in trying one of the new PSAPs! This is exciting stuff and they cost less than 1/10th the price of conventional hearing aids. Furthermore, at least two of these companies, Doppler Labs (HERE One) and Nuheara (IQbuds), already have products on the market, so you can actually try out a pair of wireless earbuds and see for yourself.

But do they address the larger social problem that noise has gotten out of hand in America? That we’re all besieged, victimized, permanently injured by too much noise? To this, the answer is definitely “no.” You and a few others might get some relief, but PSAPs are not a solution to the noise problem in America.

David Sykes chairs/co-chairs four national professional groups in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, ANSI S12 WG44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group. He is also a board member of the American Tinnitus Association, co-founder of the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), and a contributor to “Technology for a Quieter America” (2011, National Academy of Engineering). Mr. Sykes spent several decades in private equity, venture finance, and technology development and has a keen interest in how convergence and disruption affect traditional industries.

Originally posted at The Quiet Coalition.

On hearing loss and the hope for a cure

In “High-Tech Hope for the Hard of Hearing,” David Owen, The New Yorker, has written an article that gives us a good look at what scientists know about hearing loss and where they are finding possibilities for treatment and, possibly, a cure. He begins his article with a series of personal anecdotes about himself, his family, and friends and the hearing problems they’ve developed due to exposure to loud noise and other factors. Owen’s interest in this story is motivated, at least in part, by his tinnitus, which is marked by a constant high-pitched ringing in his ears.

Among the advances that Owen examines, he discusses the discovery of hidden hearing loss and introduces us to Charles Liberman, who, with his colleague Sharon Kujawa, “solved a mystery that had puzzled some audiologists for years: the fact that two people with identical results on a standard hearing test, called an audiogram, could have markedly different abilities to understand speech, especially against a background of noise.” He writes that “[s]cientists had known for a long time that most hearing impairment involves damage to the synapses and nerve fibres to which hair cells are attached, but they had assumed that the nerve damage followed hair-cell loss, and was a consequence of it.” What Liberman and Kujawa discovered is that “the connections between the sensory cells and the nerve fibres that go first.” And the reason this early damage isn’t picked up by a standard hearing test is because it measures “the ability to detect pure tones along a scale of frequencies [which] requires only functioning hair cells…and is unaffected by nerve damage until more than eighty per cent of the synapses are gone.”

“A disturbing implication of [Liberman and Kujawa’s] finding is that hearing can be damaged at decibel levels and exposure times that have traditionally been considered safe,” writes Owen, but he is reassured by the researchers that the discovery of hidden hearing loss is cause for optimism. Why? “[B]ecause reconnecting nerve synapses is almost certain to be easier than regenerating functioning hair cells inside human ears.” In fact, Owen tells us that Liberman and others “have successfully restored some damaged connections in lab animals, and [Liberman] believes that far greater advances are to come.”

While cause for optimism is welcome, Owen notes something early in his article that is particularly frustrating to those advocating for regulation of noise:

There are also increasingly effective methods of preventing damage in the first place, and of compensating for it once it’s occurred. The natural human tendency, though, is to do nothing and hope for the best, usually while pretending that nothing is wrong.

Click the link above to read this interesting and hopeful article in full.

 

 

Consumer Reports looks at affordable solutions to hearing loss:

No More Suffering in Silence? Julia Calderone, Consumer Reports, has written a thoughtful piece about hearing loss and the toll it takes on those who suffer from it.  Calderone states that hearing loss “has long been thought of as an inevitable part of getting older, more a nuisance than a life-altering medical condition—at least by those not experiencing it.”  But that opinion is changing, she asserts, as “the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) have published reports calling untreated hearing loss a significant national health concern­, one that’s associated with other serious health problems, including depression and a decline in memory and concentration.”

Calderone not only treats hearing loss with the seriousness it deserves, she offers solutions to sufferers, particularly those who can’t afford to buy hearing aids, which “cost an average of $4,700 per pair in 2013.”  This is a very steep price, particularly since hearing aids are usually not covered by health insurance or Medicare.  To help with those who need hearing aids but can’t afford them, Calderone reviews a handful of hearing aid alternatives, namely personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), to see if they can fill the gap for those who need hearing aids but can’t afford to buy them.

Two PSAPs not covered in Calderone’s review are also worth considering: Doppler Labs HERE One and Nuheara’s IQbuds.  Neither company markets their PSAPs as a hearing aid or hearing aid substitute, but at around $300 a pair they offer personal amplification and soundscape management to people who might have no other options.

And a final thought about the sorry state of hearing health in the U.S.: For people who are suffering noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), the personal and economic costs could have been avoided in the first place because NIHL is 100% preventable.

 

T-coil makes the world more accessible for the hearing impaired

Terry Byrne, The Boston Globe, writes about how the New Repertory Theatre is helping the hearing impaired enjoy the theater.  Byrne reports that the New Repertory Theatre installed a new assistive listening system before the start of the fall season that uses a hearing induction loop that “directly and wirelessly receives amplified sound from the stage without background noise.”  Audience members with hearing aids or cochlear implants that have T-coil receivers can “simply press a button on their hearing aid to take advantage of the theater’s system.”

Kayla C. Leed, Mountain Xpress, reporting on a presentation by Juliette Sterkens, national hearing loop advocate for the nonprofit Hearing Loss Association of America, writes:

A hearing loop is a wire that circles a room and is connected to a sound system. The loop transmits the sound electromagnetically, and its signal is then picked up by the telecoil in the hearing aid or cochlear implant.”

Hearing loops are becoming more popular in the U.S., Sterkens pointed out. They’re available in airports, train stations, places of worship, stadiums, auditoriums, grocery store cash registers and libraries. New York City subway stations and taxis are required to have hearing loops installed.

Do you or someone you know have a hearing aid or cochlear implant with a T-coil receiver?  Download this loop finder app to help find nearby loop-enabled venues.

Thanks to Charles Shamoon for the links.