Hearing loss

New study shows hope for hearing loss. Again.

Image credit: Chittka L. Brockmann licensed under CC BY 2.5

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report shows hope for hearing loss, describing a technique that may work to deliver drugs to inner ear structures deep within the skull, perhaps to treat hearing loss.

Whether these techniques will actually work, will be approved by the FDA, and will be affordable remains to be seen, probably years or even decades in the future.

In the meantime, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound–or several pounds–worth of cure.

Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Avoid loud noise and avoid hearing loss.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud. If you can’t carry on a normal conversation without straining to speak or to be heard, the ambient noise is above the auditory injury threshold of 75 A-weighted decibels, and your hearing is being damaged.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Can bananas protect against hearing loss?

Photo credit: Dom J from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Can bananas protect against hearing loss?

This report from Australia states that nutrients in bananas–zinc and potassium–can help protect hearing.

The potassium reportedly protects against hearing loss and the zinc against tinnitus.

That may be true and everyone should eat a healthy diet including at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily, but I doubt that these two nutrients by themselves will prevent auditory damage from noise exposure.

And I’m always puzzled that researchers and the public look for various cures or treatments for auditory disorders- many of questionable scientific validity or still in a very preliminary stage of development- when there is one proven effective way to protect hearing:

Avoid loud noise, or wear hearing protection if you can’t escape the noise.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Musician wins landmark case over damaged hearing

Photo credit: MITO SettembreMusica licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The BBC reports that a viola player who suffered a life-changing hearing injury at a rehearsal of a Wagner opera is entitled for compensation for his injury.

This is the first time that acoustic shock has been recognized as a compensable work-related condition.

A one-time exposure to extremely loud noise–often caused by a blast injury but possible from other loud noise–physically disrupts the structures in the inner ear. In many if not most cases, they can’t recover from the trauma.

Even if the noise isn’t 130 decibels, it can still cause lifelong hearing loss, tinnitus, or hyperacusis.

I have been unable to find more than anecdotal reports in the medical literature of this type of auditory damage, and in science the operative phrase is “the plural of anecdotes isn’t data,” but we all need to be aware of the dangers of noise.

As violist Chris Goldscheider unfortunately learned, if it sounds too loud, it is too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Hearing loss is associated with accidental injury

Photo credit: slgckgc licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This paper in the March 22, 2018, issue of JAMA Otolaryngology reports that difficulty hearing is associated with an increased risk of accidental injury. The study is preliminary because it relies on subject self-report of hearing difficulty rather than measured hearing loss, but it makes sense. Sound provides much information–for communication, for entertainment, and for warning of hazards–and if you have difficulty hearing, you’ll become aware of problems (e.g., an approaching vehicle, a power tool that’s getting stuck, or even just a shouted warning) later than if you had good hearing.

Think about all the accidental injury that could be avoided if people made an effort to protect their hearing.  After all, most hearing loss in adults is noise-induced hearing loss which is 100% preventable.

Protect your hearing by avoiding loud noise or using hearing protection, and avoid accidental injury, too.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Noise is a health hazard worldwide

Photo credit: John Benwell licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article by Matthew Keegan, The Guardian, discusses noise as a health hazard. Members of The Quiet Coalition provided medical and scientific information to the reporter, and I am quoted in the article. I hope you will agree that it is an excellent summary of a complex subject.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Turn that down! We can prevent hearing loss

Photo credit: Anthony from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Dr. Vic Snyder, a former congressman from Arkansas who is now a medical director at the Blue Cross/Blue Shield affiliate there, has it exactly right: hearing loss (and tinnitus) can be prevented by turning down the volume, walking away from noise sources, and using hearing protection.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

CDC promotes hearing health

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The U.S. Centers for DIsease Control and Promotion has recognized that hearing loss is a major problem in the U.S. and worldwide. Last June 2017 summer, it organized a CDC Grand Rounds on this topic.  The following new CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports summarizes that June meeting CDC Grand Rounds: Promoting Hearing Health Across the Lifespan. Here’s a link to the video of the Grand Rounds presentations.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

March 3 is World Hearing Day

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

For the past several years, the World Health Organization has sponsored World Hearing Day, one day during the year when WHO draws attention to hearing health issues.

Each year WHO selects a theme for its communications. This year, the theme is “Hear the future.” With the theme “Hear the future,” World Hearing Day 2018 will draw attention to the anticipated increase in the number of people with hearing loss around the world in the coming decades. It will focus on preventive strategies to stem the rise and outline steps to ensure access to the necessary rehabilitation services and communication tools and products for people with hearing loss.

There are many causes of hearing loss–congenital conditions, repeated ear infections, head trauma, degenerative genetic conditions, various chronic diseases, and ototoxic drugs among them–but the most common cause of hearing loss is noise exposure.

Which should give us a sense of hope in the fight against hearing loss, because unlike other causes, noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Remember: if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud!

Your ears are like your knees or your eyes: you only have two of them. Take good care of them, protect them from loud noise, and you will be able to hear well all your life.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.