Hearing protection

Early signs of hearing damage seen in young concert goers

Photo credit: Thibault Trillet from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report in The Conversation, a UK website, discusses research showing that young adults who regularly attend loud clubs and rock concerts have evidence of hearing loss. The hearing loss found falls into the “hidden hearing loss” category, so-called because it is not detected by standard hearing tests (“pure tone audiometry”), but only by techniques currently used only in research. These tests found subtle hearing loss and decreases in auditory signals sent to the brain. There were equal amounts of damage in musicians and non-musicians alike. It looks like all the young adults had too much noise exposure.

Hidden hearing loss is now thought to be the cause of the “speech in noise” problem, where middle-aged and older adults have difficulty following one conversation among many in a noisy environment. That’s a complex task for the ear and the brain, requiring lots of auditory information to be processed centrally. When the ear and brain are damaged, that doesn’t happen.

The only quibble I have with The Conversation’s report is that the authors make the common mistake of citing occupational noise exposure levels when talking about noise exposure in the public. Occupational noise exposure limits don’t protect workers from noise-induced hearing loss, and the UK’s 85 decibel exposure limit cited is certainly not safe for hearing.

The only noise exposure level that prevents hearing loss is a daily average of 70 decibels, which is much less noise than most urban dwellers around the world get every day.

Prevention of noise-induced hearing loss–hidden or not–is simple: avoid loud noise exposure and use hearing protection if you can’t.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Chemical earmuffs to prevent hearing loss?

Photo credit: Ben Dracup licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Perhaps I shouldn’t be surprised when researchers try to develop a more complicated way of doing something that can already be done much more easily and much more cheaply. This article in The Hearing Journal reports research on chemicals that appear to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in an experimental animal model. The hope is that in the future chemicals can be developed that when taken by humans will prevent hearing loss after noise exposure.

Such a chemical might be helpful for those who can’t avoid loud noise, e.g., soldiers or police officers, or perhaps for those inadvertently exposed to loud noise.

For the rest of us, that may or may not ever come to fruition. But a much easier and cheaper way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss already exists. What is it? Simply this: Avoid exposure to loud noise, and if that can’t be done, use hearing protection like earplugs or earmuffs!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The CDC says “Protect your hearing”

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises everyone to protect his or hearing during July, which is Fireworks Safety Month:

Of course, we agree.

We only have two ears, and unlike our knees, they can’t be replaced.

I’ll go one step further and recommend that fireworks on July 4th be left to professionals and not used at home. Every year, people lose fingers or eyes because they or someone who loves them sets off fireworks at home, with disastrous consequences.

Please stay safe this fireworks season and protect your ears, too.

Thanks to the CDC for helping educate Americans about how to protect our auditory health.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Fireworks noise can damage your ears

Photo credit: ViTalko from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from KCBD in Texas discusses the dangers of fireworks noise for auditory health. The audiologist interviewed, Leigh Ann Reel, Ph.D., is especially concerned about impulsive noise, as from an explosion. One exposure at close range can cause permanent hearing loss, tinnitus, or hyperacusis.

Fire departments and public health authorities generally recommend leaving fireworks displays to the professionals, but in many states and localities personal use of fireworks is legal and enforcement of fireworks bans is spotty.

I would prefer quiet fireworks, as have been mandated in many parts of Europe, both for people and for their pets.

Please stay safe.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

If it makes more noise than a rake, protect your hearing

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just published this fact sheet about protecting your hearing when doing yard care. All power tools, whether gasoline or electric, make enough noise to damage hearing. In general, electric tools are quieter than those powered by two-stroke gasoline engines, and they also don’t produce noxious and toxic gaseous emissions.

One of the big technological advances in yard care in the last year or two is the widespread availability of powerful battery-powered yard care equipment, including leaf blowers, hedge trimmers, even lawnmowers. These are now available online or in any of the big-box home improvement stores. There’s no need to worry about extension cords or shock hazards.

Other than my wife, children, and grandchildren, gardening is my first love. From 2005-2014 I served on the board of the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers and Native Plants, Inc. When I was termed out from that service, I became a noise activist, focused on trying to make the world a quieter place. But I’d much rather be quietly working in my garden.

Raking leaves, trimming a plant, or pulling a weed, using hand tools as gardeners have done for centuries, is quiet and contemplative.

Only rarely will I use an electric pole trimmer to cut pesky branches that I can’t reach without getting on a ladder, but I’ll put in my earplugs first. Because if a yard care tool is louder than a rake or a pruning shears, it’s loud enough to cause hearing loss.

So when you are doing yard work, use earplugs or earmuff hearing protection now to avoid hearing aids later. And if you hire someone to maintain your landscape, insist that the workers are provided hearing protection. They are at special risk for hearing loss as well as other noise-related health problems.

Thanks to our friends at the CDC for helping educate the public about the dangers of noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

On hidden hearing loss

Photo credit: mentatdgt from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article by Alexia Hendrickson on About Manchester, a UK site, is a good primer on hidden hearing loss.

Hidden hearing loss got its name because people often complain of being unable to understand speech in noisy environments, but their hearing tests are normal. The auditory damage is “hidden,” because it is detected only by specialized research techniques.

Of note is the discussion about mild hearing loss in children being sufficient to interfere with learning. Hendrickson mentions some helpful tips, but to me the most important thing tip was missing. Namely, the best option is to prevent hearing loss of any kind–hidden or not–by avoiding exposure to loud sounds.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As I have written previously, I’m not a big believer in special days or months. As far as I’m concerned, every day is World Hearing Day, every month is Better Hearing and Speech Month, and, of course, this month every day is Mother’s Day!

But I have also acknowledged that it helps to have a special day or month to celebrate something or someone and to remind us of important events or topics.

Thanks to our friends at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for all the helpful information they have prepared on protecting our hearing, which they are sharing with the public every month.

Please stay safe, both from COVID and from noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Popular Mechanics reviews quiet, electric mowers

Photo credit: MonikaP from Pixabay

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Heres’ some good news: Popular Mechanics magazine has published a review of quieter, battery-powered electric lawn mowers. The bad news is they didn’t measure their noise levels! How bizarre is that? Consumer Reports also tests lawn maintenance equipment, so you may want to check there too.

In the EU, manufacturers are required to test the noise levels of over 50 classes of products, including household appliances and construction equipment. So if you’re concerned about noise levels, look for European-made equipment because the manufacturers can tell you exactly how loud their products are–they’re required to do this following standardized procedures.

The difference in the american and European approaces are discussed in the 2011 report from the National Academy of Engineering, “Technology for a Quieter America. TLDR: The Europeans have a big head start on us.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Is your music making you deaf?

Photo credit: Harrison Haines from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Is your music making you deaf?  That’s the title of this post from BWorld online.

The answer, technically, is no. Deafness means congenital absence of hearing, or profound hearing loss. Loud music won’t make you deaf. But loud music can certainly cause hearing loss.

Hearing loss and tinnitus are occupational hazards of being a rock musician. And loud music is a threat to auditory health of concert goers and clubgoers and those who listen to loud music on their personal listening devices.

We recommend avoiding loud music all the time. There is no such thing as temporary auditory damage.

If the music (or any other sound) sounds too loud, it IS too loud. Turn down the volume, leave the area, use hearing protection, or accept that you’ll probably need hearing aids in the future.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Another young person develops tinnitus from loud music

Photo credit: edoardo tommasini from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from The Irish News discusses TV personality and actor Jamie Laing, who developed tinnitus at age 31 from listening to loud music. He woke up one morning hearing a loud buzzing noise. He searched his house to see where it was coming from, but then realized that it was inside his own head.

This is called tinnitus, ringing in the ears but technically defined as a perception of noise with no external sound source.

Mr. Laing sought medical attention. His discussion of what his doctor said and his reaction to that is a good summary of what many others have said:

“My GP said there were a number of possible causes but exposure to loud music in nightclubs was the most likely one in my case,” says Jamie, who is dating fellow Made In Chelsea star Sophie ‘Habbs’ Habboo (26).

“My GP explained there was no cure, but it would probably go away eventually on its own as I got used to it. There were treatments available to help me come to terms with it, until it did,” says Jamie.

“At first I couldn’t believe I could have tinnitus, I thought it only affected older people or people who were exposed to loud bangs – but it’s more common than people think. I’d been to festivals and concerts and listened to music on headphones – the louder the better when I was younger.

“But I’d never stood next to the speakers at concerts, or been in a band – I’d probably been to a few too many festivals where the music was loud and never worn ear plugs.

“I wish I had now – protecting your ears against loud noise is so important.”

I’m just back from Geneva, where I spoke about the need for regulation of club and concert noise at the World Health Organization consultation on its Make Listening Safe program. WHO is working on these recommendations, including requirements for sound limits and for warning signs about the dangers of noise, and also requiring offer of free earplugs.

Because as with Mr. Laing, most people, young or old, don’t know that exposure to loud music, whether many times or even only one time, can cause tinnitus for the rest of one’s life.

That’s how I developed tinnitus, after a one-time exposure to loud noise in a restaurant on New Year’s Eve 2007.

I wish I had known the basic rule: if it sounds too loud, it is too loud! Ask for the volume to be lowered, leave the noisy environment, insert earplugs, or possibly face lifelong tinnitus, like me and Jamie Laing and millions of others.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.