Hell is other people

Anti-social miscreant charged criminally

for being an anti-social miscreant: Man charged for playing car stereo too loud. No doubt there may be some who assume the cops in Central Saanich on Vancouver Island, Canada, have too much time on their hands and too little work to do.

And they would be wrong.

Although Dustin Hamilton, the offender, claims he didn’t mean to annoy people, well, let’s just say certain facts belie his feigned innocence. Like the fact that his “car is equipped with a decibel reader and he says he plays it at 150.” Or that he boasted to Asymina Kantorowicz, writer/producer at CTV News, that his sound system can reach 155 decibels. To give you an idea about how loud that is, according to Dangerous Decibels, a jet plane at 100 feet away is around 135 decibels, and the permissible listening time for someone exposed to 115 decibels is under 30 seconds. It’s a wonder he can even hear.

And then there’s the bit about the number of neighbors filing complaints. Said Hamilton, “[i]f somebody just came up to me nicely saying ‘hey I live here this is what’s happening’ you know we could do that but I never had that, I just had a guy follow me and try and assault me,” adding, “[i]t went from that to basically 17 people complaining and a mischief charge.” From one guy trying to assault him to 17 complaints, and he has no idea why.

Hamilton’s charge comes with certain conditions, like not contacting the complainants and not driving on certain roads. No surprise he is put out, as is his girlfriend, who likes her music as loud as he does, reminding us of the adage, “there’s a lid for every pot.”

In the end, Hamilton would claim that the reason for the crazy loud music isn’t some sociopathic need to torment his neighbors. No, for Hamilton it comes down to this: “I can play anything, rap, hip-hop, it all sounds good … I love sound man.”

Not for long, Hamilton.

Thanks to Jan L. Mayes for the link.

The Brits sure take their noise complaints seriously:

 

Photo credit: InfoGibraltar licensed under CC BY 2.0

Warrant issued for the arrest of a noisy neighbour. A warrant may seem a bit much, but it came after the offender failed to appear in court to address “12 reports of noise nuisance including raised voices and loud music, banging and stamping.” Apparently the neighborhood miscreant was so loud that complaints came not only in his apartment block, but in adjacent blocks as well. And while some may think issuing a warrant for his arrest is a bit extreme, Councillor Sam Lisle, executive member for housing and safer neighbourhoods, notes:

“Noise nuisance can blight people’s lives so we support people who report it and will take action against those who create it.

We offer lots of advice and information about acceptable noise levels so there is no excuse.”

Hear, hear!

 

Another reason to avoid fast food and chain restaurants

Photo credit: Mike Mozart licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

My wife and I don’t eat in restaurants much anymore–the vast majority are just too noisy to enjoy both the meal and the conversation–and we don’t patronize fast food or chain restaurants. Burgers and fries and sodas are just not healthy food, and I try to stay healthy.

But for those who do, according to Culture Cheat Sheet noise is a major problem, joining a list of complaints that includes dirty spaces, bad service, and bad food. Culture Cheat Sheet cobbled together survey results from Consumer Reports, the American Customer Satisfaction Index, and Temkin Experience Ratings to come up with their report on the most hated restaurant and fast food chains.

Most fast food and chain restaurants use a formula of tasty but unhealthy food with too much fat, too much sugar, too much salt, and too many calories at a relatively low price to lure customers.

Research shows a clear correlation between the density of fast food restaurants in neighborhoods–largely poor neighborhoods populated by African-American and Hispanic people–and obesity. The epidemic of obesity in the U.S. is related to changes in eating patterns–fast food, sugary sodas, bigger portions–and decreased exercise.

But now it appears that these restaurants also serve up a side order of hearing loss with their food. Because noise is causing an epidemic of noise-induced hearing loss, too.

And that’s another reason to avoid these restaurants.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Canadian man fined for loudly singing

 

Here’s how you sing in a car responsibly!  |   Photo credit: nikoretro licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Everybody Dance Now. The BBC reports that a Canadian man was pulled over and ticketed by Montreal police for “screaming in a public place” after “being caught singing in his car.” He is contesting the ticket, which is no laughing matter–$149 Canadian, which is a little under $120 U.S. Taoufik Moalla, 38, doesn’t dispute that he was singing in his car. Rather he claims that his singing “wasn’t loud enough to disturb anyone.” Apparently the Montreal police would disagree, although it is unclear from the article whether the reason for the ticket was loudness or his musical taste.

While there may be disagreement about whether the police action was justified, we think most would agree that this is criminal: Mr. Moalla was in his car driving to  the grocery store to buy a bottle of water.

Surely that should have earned him a second ticket.

Noise can make you deaf

Photo credit: UrbanUrban_ru licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

And the Hindustan Times, knowing this, advises its readers: This Diwali, turn a deaf ear to noise.

Diwali is happening now, so enjoy the sigts–and some of the sounds–and don’t forget to pack some disposable earplugs for yourself, your friends, and family.

Intense crowd noise sidelines German soccer star

 

Photo credit: Эдгар Брещанов licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Temporarily, at least. The Guardian reports that “Timo Werner is ‘feeling better’ after he asked to be substituted due to the intense noise created by the home supporters during RB Leipzig’s Champions League defeat to Besiktas on Tuesday.” Werner asked for the substitution only after he had already asked for, and received, ear plugs. The team manager, Ralph Hasenhüttl, said that he had “no choice but to accede to Werner’s request,” while noting that “[t]here was a deafening noise [and] at the start of the game we were a bit affected.”

We would say kudos to Team Manager Hasenhüttl for taking Werner’s request seriously, but The Guardian reports Hasenhüttl “appeared to criticise Werner’s request to be withdrawn so early,” hinting that he was disappointed.  And then he threw in a dig about needing to know that he can rely on his players.

Instead of questioning Werner’s reliability, perhaps Hasenhüttl should demand that stadium owners do something about damaging noise. Adding that we must note our surprise with Hasenhüttl’s comments given that in Germany noise regulation is taken very seriously.

Noise as a weapon, the bad neighbor edition

What happens when an entitled someone moves to the countryside next to a neighbor who has chickens? This: Skynews reports that a neighbor dispute over a noisy ‘foreign’ cockerel led Millionaire ‘harassed lesbian neighbours by blaring ‘When a Man Loves a Woman’ when their new cockerel crowed.’

If you move to the country, you will hear chickens and roosters and other livestock. What you don’t expect to hear is a cranked up sound system being blasted by a monied asshole. Fortunately the story has a happy ending, because in the UK they take this sort of anti-social behavior very seriously. While the miscreant was not found guilty of harassment, he is barred from any contact with the two women, directly or indirectly, for two years. Added the judge, “[y]ou have to live as neighbours, you need to behave and stop being stupid or petulant.” Hear, hear!

 

Football stadium noise still here for another season

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

It’s been years since I’ve been to a college football game. The last games I attended were at the Los Angeles Coliseum, one of the quieter big-school stadiums, during the Pete Carroll era at USC. But I have read about and written a number of stories on stadium noise. Here is the latest story about the stadium noise at the University of Oregon’s Autzen Stadium.

This article, like every other article about stadium noise, says the same things: the noise is distracting so the coaching staff makes the team practice with loud music being blasted at them. Why is it understood that the coach should “condition” his team rather than demand that the noise level be controlled? Simply put, crowd noise shouldn’t be a factor in a football game. What Coach Riley (and everyone else attending the game) doesn’t know is that if it’s loud enough to impact play on the field, it’s loud enough to cause auditory damage.

The Quiet Coalition is still waiting for the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and its member colleges and universities–many of which have medical schools, schools of public health, audiology programs, or all three–to do something to protect the hearing of their student athletes and those attending the games. At least this University of Tennessee audiology professor understands the problem, which is why she recommends that students use earplugs when they attend UT football games. Kudos Dr. Patti Johnstone! But rather than having students block the noise, why not demand that the university control the noise in the first instance?

And as this article shows, stadium noise is a factor in professional games, too. In fact, stadium noise probably contributed to the Los Angeles Chargers recent loss in Denver.

Should football games be decided on the field, or by the home crowd purposefully making too much noise for the visiting team to hear the play being called? Whatever happened to good sportsmanship?

Sadly, it appears the NCAA, professional football teams, and stadium owners won’t address noise until and unless someone sues them because they developed sudden hearing loss or tinnitus after attending a game. Let’s hope that happens before many players and fans suffer significant hearing loss or develop tinnitus.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise is the excreta of technological civilization

Photo credit: G.M. Briggs

Jonathan Power, author and former foreign affairs columnist for The International Herald Tribune, writes about favorite sounds and the scourge that is noise. Power’s favorite sounds “are the quiet sounds of the English Lake District,” which he contrasts with the sound of noise: cars and trucks, airplanes and builders, canned music in cafes, a symphony playing an atonal concerto.  “Noise,” he concludes, “is the excreta of technological civilization,” adding that “[o]ne study predicts that exposure to loud music will cause 50 million Americans to suffer heavy hearing loss by 2050.”

Power looks at the health effects of noise–not just damage to hearing, but also “high blood pressure, disturbed sleep and even heart disease.” He writes about the fight against another runway at Heathrow and the political fight that was lost–or is it?–by the tens of thousands living near the airport, while noting that smaller battles can be won. And while noise “is never likely to compete with other political issues such as unemployment and nuclear weapons in North Korea,” Power notes that politicians are sensitive to political pressure. Moreover, he lists measures that have been tried and tested in various places which can be borrowed wherever we live, like Switzerland’s ban on the driving of heavy trucks at night and on Sundays, or the U.S.’s and UK’s modification of noise regulations in 1976 which required older aircraft to comply with noise limits set for new aircraft.

Power calls for us to put these and other examples on social media and, more importantly, to “demand MORE, and distribute your demands far and wide.”  In the end, if we want to enjoy our favorite sounds, we have to fight for the right to hear them.