Intentional noise

London deploys noise cameras to combat “antisocial supercar drivers”

Photo credit: Adrian Dorobantu from Pexels

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

The BBC reports that “[m]ore than a hundred people have been threatened with fines after London’s first noise cameras were set up to combat antisocial supercar drivers.”  Drivers who have been using Knightsbridge streets as racetracks will first receive warnings but second offenses will carry fines. The cameras identify cars exceeding a threshold of 74 decibels, and fines are imposed ranging from $130 to $3,230 (U.S. equivalent of pounds noted in article)–persistent offenders may have their vehicles taken. It should be noted that the Council member of Transport recognized that most drivers are considerate.

In an earlier post, I wrote about a group in Washington Heights and Inwood who has set up a task force to address the increase in noise levels in the community, including noise from drag racing. I have also spoken with other groups in New York City and Westchester that have noted an uptick in noisy vehicles racing down their streets. These groups, as well as many other New Yorkers, would welcome legislation calling for noise cameras on their streets to combat noise that is increasing and detrimental to their health and well-being.

New York bill S.B. 9009, introduced by State Senator Andrew Gounardes, would increase fines for loud car and motorcycle exhaust systems and mufflers. This law would require police vehicles to be equipped with decibel meters to measure the sounds of passing vehicles and would issue violations in excess of decibel limits set by the law. The current law sets a fine of a maximum of $150 for after-market violations but this bill would increase the maximum fine to $1,000. Also, under the current law police officers are to determine whether noise is excessive, but under the proposed bill police officers would be equipped with decibel meters to measure the actual sound levels.

State Senator Gournades’ legislation clearly indicates an awareness of the hazards to health brought about by loud vehicle equipment as well as a desire to remedy this problem. But enforcement of legislation is key and enforcement of noise regulations often falls seriously short as underscored by New York State Comptroller DiNapoli’s 2018 report regarding the New York City’s Noise Code. I would suggest that New York State legislators look into the UK program and consider a pilot project to identify loud vehicles by cameras which might make enforcement easier, and, more importantly, curb a dreadful noise pollutant.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

New York pols seek stiffer fines for modified mufflers

Photo credit: Markus Spiske from Pexels

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

New Yorkers are very likely appreciative of the lawmakers, State Senator Andrew Gournardes and City Councilman Justin Brannan, for introducing legislation, a bill at the state level and a bill at the City Council, to impose stiffer fines for excessive vehicle noise. These legislators speak for many New Yorkers when they were quoted as being “tired of moronic motorists terrorizing New York streets with deafening loud mufflers and exhaust systems.”

The bills would increase the penalties for modifying mufflers and ensure that police officers have the ability to measure the decibel sound levels emitted. The legislators have noted the blasting noises from these vehicles at night have been especially disruptive to sleep. With so many people already experiencing extra stress, sleep is especially important. But sleep is always important to health, and lack of sleep due to noise has been found to impede overall health and quality of life.

While the legislators believe higher fines and police armed with decibel meters will make people think twice about modifying exhaust systems to make them intentionally louder, the key to stopping this noise is the enforcement of the law. Will this legislation indeed bring about an increase in the issuance of violations? Have the lawmakers thought of introducing provisions in the bills that will allow for an evaluation of how the bills are enforced within a year after their passage?

Passing laws is critical in maintaining order, but without enforcement these laws carry little weight. Too often, when it comes to noise, New Yorkers have found that noise laws do not get enforced as they should, as underscored in this 2018 noise report by New York State comptroller DiNapoli.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Cops use of LRADs violates 1st amendment rights

Photo credit: Mike Hudack licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

This Associated Press article notes that federal officials were considering the use of long range acoustic devices to disperse crowds during Washington demonstrations. This device has also been called a “sound cannon” because the sound emitted can actually harm the hearing of nearby individuals exposed to its auditory blasts. The military uses this device to warn ships of oncoming vessels which can give you the idea of how loud this device is.

The use of LRADs by the New York City police department as a crowd-control device to disperse crowds on the one-year anniversary of Eric Garner’s death was deemed by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals to be “considered excessive force.” The Supreme Court denied review of these findings this past May, allowing the plaintiffs to move forward with their case in New York City.

But in addition to the danger that the use of an LRAD poses to the hearing and well-being of individuals who happen to be in crowds protesting what they consider injustices, there is another issue at stake as noted by Kia Rahnama in her article “How the Supreme Court Dropped the Ball on the Right to Protest,” namely the right of citizens to peacefully assemble. Isn’t it time for the Supreme Court to weigh in on the right to assemble, which is protected by the First Amendment?

While the articles cited inform us of the dangers of using crowd-dispersing devices that may harm us, they also address the importance of allowing people to voice their opinions in groups that are for the most part peaceful, actions the Supreme Court should deem appropriate. Writing about the Supreme Court and its significance in protecting the rights of U.S. citizens is especially timely today in light of the death of the esteemed Ruth Bader Ginsburg. We all need to pay close attention to how our Supreme Court judges are selected. Our Constitutional Rights are at stake!

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Fake crowd noise poses real health threat

by Jan L. Mayes, MSc, Audiologist

With coronavirus pandemic restrictions on fan attendance, NFL football teams have lost the stadium crowd noise once called a home field secret weapon by the Seattle Seahawks.

As a solution, the NFL has developed club and stadium specific crowd-noise audio to use during TV broadcasts. While the TV crowd-noise audio will have dynamic volumes reactive to game situations, a separate field-level crowd-noise audio played during games has been described as “human torture” by 49ers coach Kyle Shanahan.

The steady volume continuous field-level noise is being played in the 70 to 75 decibel (dB) range which is much lower than typical levels in stadiums full of fans. This new NFL audio soundscape is a good example of the subjective nature of sound perception with teams preferring real or realistic crowd noise reactions over the lower volume drone of pre-recorded field-level audio.

Objectively, sound energy above 70 dB is a hearing health risk. Some teams use special earplugs to screen out harmful noise. Stadiums could also turn down the volume of the new ambient crowd-noise.

One day it will be safe again for fans to return to stadiums. But until then, the NFL’s new field-level crowd-noise won’t give a home field advantage to any team.

Jan L. Mayes is an international Eric Hoffer Award winning author in Non-Fiction Health. She is also a blogger and newly retired audiologist still specializing in noise, tinnitus-hyperacusis, and hearing health education. You can read more of Jan’s work at her site, www.janlmayes.com.

 

NFL warns teams against “shady noise practices”

NY Giants before COVID  Photo credit: Fabienne Wassermann licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

My family and I, as New York Giant Football fans, have been going to Giant games for many years. But we won’t be going this year because the Giant games will be played without attendees. The New York Giants have enrolled their ticket holders, which I am one, with exclusive benefits such as “live-out-of-market preseason games and replays of every game all season,” but these virtual experiences will not make up for the in-person attendance at the Giant games.

Thus, a recent article about the NFL warning teams about “shady noisy practices” caught my eye. With most of the National Football League’s 32 teams announcing that they will not start the season with fans in attendance, it had been decided to use “artificial crowd noise” to motivate the players. The NFL has cautioned teams, however, that “turning up the volume” at critical third downs for the home teams will not be permitted. Just as I believe in-person attendance brings a special joy to football fans, I wonder if football players will be as inspired with artificial crowd noise as they would be with real roars and shouts of fans in the stadiums.

I would like to address another issue with this article. As a long-term researcher and writer on the adverse effects of noise on health and well-being, I tend to be careful about distinguishing sound from noise. A noise is generally defined as a sound that is harmful to health. Not all sounds are noises. There are sounds that are welcoming and pleasant such as birdsong and raindrops falling on leaves. Music is also delightful, as are the sounds of children laughing on the playground or cheering on the characters at the Macy’s Day Parade. I tend to think of the supportive sounds we hear at baseball and football games as both exalting to players as well as fans. Yes, at times they may be too loud and should be toned down, but for the most part, the cheers at games are so essential to the experience of being a sports fan.

I would like to compliment the engineers in charge of introducing these crowd sounds–I prefer not to call these sounds noise–for not allowing them to be too loud, indicating an awareness of the dangers of loud sounds to our hearing and health. What did puzzle me, however, is that these crowd sounds will also be used in stadiums with fans. Yet, the article cited has noted that the league “will reevaluate that decision as the season progresses.”

This football fan is awaiting what this football season will look and sound like. One thing is for sure—I will be rooting for my home team, the New York Giants.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Creating a home court advantage–the importance of sound

Photo credit: Daveslyk licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I commented recently on the possible role of crowd noise in creating the home field or home court advantage. In that post, I noted the COVID-19 lockdown with no fans in attendance at sports events had created a natural experiment where the effect of home crowd noise on winning might be able to be evaluated.

But it turns out that at least one of the three leagues I wrote about, the NBA, is artificially creating a home court advantage on the neutral courts in Disney World where the remainder of the NBA season is being played. How are they doing it? By using a “database of music, audio cues and graphics that teams would ordinarily be using in their own arenas.”

So what I had hoped would be a natural experiment may not be such a good experimental design after all.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

How not to deal with a noisy neighbor

Photo credit: Weatherman90 licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

It was not surprising to read that Toto’s Steve Lukather decided to deal with his neighbor’s noisy landscaping equipment disturbing him in the early morning hours by unleashing “a loud solo before screaming ‘Good morning’ in the direction of his hedges.” As the Board member of GrowNYC who responds to noise queries, New Yorkers often call me to complain about noisy neighbors. Too often, they have told me that they want to bang upstairs with brooms to reciprocate for being awakened in the early morning with loud footsteps along uncarpeted floors. I am certain these callers would applaud Lukather’s actions as did many of his followers.

Before offering to assist New York City residents who call me, I urge them not to take the route that Lukather did. I add that one should not engage in the same bad behavior displayed by their neighbors to resolve the noise problem. I guess as the wife of an attorney, and the mother of two attorneys, I know that the law doesn’t look favorably on trying to stop inappropriate behavior by using inappropriate behavior.

While not resolving all the neighbor noise problems that are brought to my attention, I have been successful a large number of times. Sometimes it is a matter of having the complainant approach the neighbor and discussing the noise situation with literature noting the deleterious impacts of noise on health. At other times, it is asking the landlord or managing agent to handle the matter under the “warranty of habitability” clause of leases that provide tenants with the right to “reasonable quiet” in their apartments.

Let me stress that noises are hazardous to one’s mental and physical well-being and should not be dismissed. Before calling me, many of the New Yorkers with whom I have spoken told me that they have tried speaking with neighbors, calling 311, and asking local officials for assistance with the noise matter. When no relief follows, they very much want to handle the noise matter as Lukather did. And I am certain that many New Yorkers whom I have not heard from do.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

NYC residents form task force against noise

Photo credit: Susan Sermoneta licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

Concerned about the rise in noise in Inwood and Washington Heights, and supported by the largest number of noise-related complaints filed this year to 311 by the Manhattan community board that encompasses these neighborhoods, a group of residents formed a task force to address the noise in their community, e.g. street noises, residential noises, loud fireworks, and noisy vehicles. These two groups, named WAHI and Inwood for Respectful Decibel Levels, at their press conference, called on city agencies, elected public officials and their Community Board 12 members to support them in their efforts.

Over forty years ago, I had conducted study on the impact of elevated train noise on children’s classroom learning at their school in Inwood and found that the reading scores of children attending classes exposed to the train noise were significantly lower than children on the quiet side of the building. The results of this study were published in an academic journal but also shared with the community residents and their public officials. Working with the community and their elected officials, we were able to get the Transit Authority to lessen the noise on the tracks and the Board of Education to place sound absorbing materials in the noisy classrooms. A study following these two abatements found that children on both sides of the building were now reading at the same level.

Thus, it was not surprising that the Inwood/Washington Heights group would ask for my assistance to combat the noise they are now experiencing in their neighborhood. The fact that the community had played a role in lessening the noises at a district school earlier has given them confidence as they move forward to reduce the noise levels in their community today. The community also knows that today there is far more research demonstrating that noise is harmful to both our mental and physical health.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Paris takes on bikers’ noise

Photo credit: Carlos ZGZ has dedicated this photo to the public domain

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As we have written about several times, one unexpected result of the COVID-19 lockdowns worldwide was a reduction in noise–in cities, in the water, even in terms of measured seismic activity. As life has started to return to something approaching normal, noise levels are increasing.

In Paris, one cause of increased noise is motorcycles with altered exhausts. As this BBC report shows, one motorcycle riding through Paris at night can disturb the sleep of thousands of people.

In response, the police are enforcing motorcycle quiet laws, and the city is developing an automated noise monitoring system.

Maybe other cities around the world can do the same?

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Noise complaints on the rise in NYC

Photo credit: Dan Nguyen licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

New York City, the city that has long been known to be noisy, is even noisier, according to an article by Shaye Weaver. Weaver writes that since February of this year, noise complaints in the city have increased “an astonishing 279 percent.” Firework noise was the overwhelming complaint in June, but complaints about loud music and parties led the list overall. The Bronx had the most complaints, with Staten Island registering the fewest.

Weaver states that “2020 has been a year like no other.” The pandemic has indeed changed the city and the lives of the residents in this city as well as people worldwide, in many ways, and 2020 will be known from now on as the “Year of the Pandemic.”

Weaver’s article doesn’t mention how the New York agencies that deal with noise complaints, mainly the Department of Environmental Protection and the police department, have been responding to the 311 noise complaint calls that have been directed to them. As someone who hears from New Yorkers who have not had their noise complaints resolved, I can say that I have had increased calls about noise in communities. My callers have reported to me that loud parties are being held near their homes and apartment buildings and there has been no interest from police or public officials to address their complaints. I have also been hearing from individuals who are organizing groups in their areas to give them a stronger voice when they approach public officials and community boards, and I have offered advice and asked to be kept informed about the activities to lessen the din.

I thank Weaver for her timely article and hope that she would do a follow-up focusing on the agencies responsible for addressing noise to ask how they are dealing with this large increase in noise complaints. We have laws on the books that have been written to curtail noise but unless they are enforced, they have little, if any, value.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.