Medical and scientific news

New study shows hope for hearing loss. Again.

Image credit: Chittka L. Brockmann licensed under CC BY 2.5

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report shows hope for hearing loss, describing a technique that may work to deliver drugs to inner ear structures deep within the skull, perhaps to treat hearing loss.

Whether these techniques will actually work, will be approved by the FDA, and will be affordable remains to be seen, probably years or even decades in the future.

In the meantime, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound–or several pounds–worth of cure.

Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Avoid loud noise and avoid hearing loss.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud. If you can’t carry on a normal conversation without straining to speak or to be heard, the ambient noise is above the auditory injury threshold of 75 A-weighted decibels, and your hearing is being damaged.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Can bananas protect against hearing loss?

Photo credit: Dom J from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Can bananas protect against hearing loss?

This report from Australia states that nutrients in bananas–zinc and potassium–can help protect hearing.

The potassium reportedly protects against hearing loss and the zinc against tinnitus.

That may be true and everyone should eat a healthy diet including at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily, but I doubt that these two nutrients by themselves will prevent auditory damage from noise exposure.

And I’m always puzzled that researchers and the public look for various cures or treatments for auditory disorders- many of questionable scientific validity or still in a very preliminary stage of development- when there is one proven effective way to protect hearing:

Avoid loud noise, or wear hearing protection if you can’t escape the noise.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Hearing loss is associated with accidental injury

Photo credit: slgckgc licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This paper in the March 22, 2018, issue of JAMA Otolaryngology reports that difficulty hearing is associated with an increased risk of accidental injury. The study is preliminary because it relies on subject self-report of hearing difficulty rather than measured hearing loss, but it makes sense. Sound provides much information–for communication, for entertainment, and for warning of hazards–and if you have difficulty hearing, you’ll become aware of problems (e.g., an approaching vehicle, a power tool that’s getting stuck, or even just a shouted warning) later than if you had good hearing.

Think about all the accidental injury that could be avoided if people made an effort to protect their hearing.  After all, most hearing loss in adults is noise-induced hearing loss which is 100% preventable.

Protect your hearing by avoiding loud noise or using hearing protection, and avoid accidental injury, too.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Another promising lead for repairing hearing loss

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article reports yet another promising lead for repairing hearing loss from research done at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Sea anemones can repair hair cells on their tentacles that respond to vibration. Fish have similar hair cells on their scales that help them respond to currents in the water as well as to detect prey and avoid predators. Researcher Glen Watson, PhD, found that a protein made by sea anemones helped repair damaged hair cells, first in experiments done in fish and then in hair cells from mice. The hope is that this protein can eventually be used to help repair hair cells in humans.

This is another interesting development with potential to eventually lead to a treatment for hearing loss. But shouldn’t we focus on the cause of hearing loss, too? We already know that noise damages hair cells, leading to hearing loss, and it’s a whole lot easier and cheaper to prevent noise-induced hearing loss by avoiding loud noise exposure or protecting one’s ears if exposure cannot be avoided.

So while it is exciting to see that researchers are getting closer to finding a treatment for hearing loss, let’s not ignore a fact that requires no additional research:

Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Remember: your ears are like your eyes or your knees. God only gave you two of them. Protect them well, because you need them to last a whole lifetime!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Pursuing an invisible threat

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Prof. Richard Neitzel, of the University of Michigan and a co-founder of The Quiet Coalition, views noise as an invisible threat. In this university news release, he discusses some of his research and its implications for health.

Watch Dr. Neitzel talk about noise pollution and his career studying noise pollution exposure and health outcomes:

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

New treatment for tinnitus gives hope

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from the University of Michigan about Susan Shore PhD’s research gives hope to tinnitus sufferers that finally an effective treatment may be on the way.

Tinnitus, ringing in the ears, is most commonly caused by noise exposure, either chronic noise exposure or a one-time exposure to loud noise.

Given the causal relationship between noise exposure and both tinnitus and hyperacusis, a collapsed tolerance to usual environmental sound, many people have both. About half of those with tinnitus have significant hearing loss.

My own tinnitus developed after a one-time exposure to loud noise, so my hearing remains good. But I wish I had known that a one-time exposure to loud noise could cause symptoms the rest of my life. That’s part of the message I’m trying to get out to the world.

The other message is that both hearing loss and tinnitus are largely preventable. And certainly noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Dr. Shore’s treatment is still in its experimental phase and no one can predict how much it will cost if and when it is approved by the FDA. Or, for that matter, if Medicare and private insurance programs will pay for it.

The most basic public health principle is that it’s far better, and far cheaper, to prevent illness or injury than to treat it. So while we wish Dr. Shore well, we hope those who do not yet have tinnitus, hyperacusis, or hearing loss take this sage–and free–advice:

Protect your ears! Avoid loud noise. Put in ear plugs if you can’t leave the noisy environment.

Remember, your ears are like your eyes or your knees: God only gave you two of them.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

The importance of the scientific method

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The New York Times reports that officials at the Centers for Disease control were told not to use certain words, including “evidence based” and “science based.

The Quiet Coalition’s website states:

The Quiet Coalition consists of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.
We believe an evidence-based approach to noise as a health and social problem, combined with educational outreach and organized action, can lead to meaningful change.
The Quiet Coalition provides a platform for communication, programs, and coordinated action for those trying to bring current medical and scientific knowledge to the process of creating a quieter, more sustainable, and livable world.

The founders and members of The Quiet Coalition believe in scientific evidence and evidence-based policy and decision making.

We urge those in government to make decisions based on sound evidence, not on faith or dogma, and to monitor programs for results.

If something doesn’t work, stop that and try something different.

That’s the scientific method. That’s how Thomas Edison invented so many things. That’s how societies get ahead.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

How your brain singles out one sound among many

Shilo Rea, Carnegie-Mellon, writes that researchers “have developed a new way to find out how the brain singles out specific sounds in distracting settings.” Why is this significant? Because, writes Rea, “[t]he study lays crucial groundwork to track deficits in auditory attention due to aging, disease, or brain trauma and to create clinical interventions, like behavioral training, to potentially correct or prevent hearing issues.”

This research is important because deficits in auditory attention are associated with social isolation, depression, cognitive dysfunction and lower work force participation. According to Frederic Dick, professor of auditory cognitive neuroscience at Birkbeck College and University College London, once neuroscientists “start to understand how subtle differences in the brain’s functional and structural architecture might make some regions more ‘fertile ground’ for learning new information.”

Click the link to read more about the fascinating study.