Motorcycle Noise

Calgary councillors take aim at motorcycle noise

 

Photo credit: Calgary Reviews licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Calgary Herald Editorial Board writes that “city politicians are once again turning their attention to the excessive sound of motorcycles and other vehicles with noisy mufflers and other needless modifications that are an irritant to all but the self-absorbed owners themselves.”  This year, the pols are looking at Edmonton, where there is a test underway that uses “a new photo-radar-style noise gun [that] is showing promise.”

If Edmonston’s test is successful, it’s possible that Calgary will adopt the technology and both cities could consider automating the device “to issue fines to too-loud users of public roads, including at nighttime, when the disturbance is particularly upsetting to residents trying to get a good night’s sleep.”

And the city of Calgary will heave a sigh of relief.

 

Proof quiet motorcycles are possible

They exist, and the police department in Warrensburg, Missouri is looking to purchase them.

If the motorcycles are powerful enough for the police to consider using them, then surely they are powerful enough for someone who just wants a reliable means of transportation. Among other things, “the bikes can go up to 140 miles in the city before being recharged,” though a full recharge takes nine hours.

Naturally, the motorcycle isn’t absolutely quiet, but removing engine noise is significant. Said Police Chief Rich Lockhart, “It’s a really, really cool bike. I rode it around quite a bit today and got a lot of looks from people. It’s completely silent. All you hear are the tires.”

For the sake of our ears, let’s hope Zero motorcycles and other all-electric competitors become the new normal.