Noise-induced Hearing Loss (NIHL)

What’s better than a cheap hearing aid?

Photo credit: ReSound licensed under CC BY 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The New York Times asked recently why hearing aids are so expensive. They should have stepped back and asked a more important question: What’s better than a cheap hearing aid?

A: Preserved natural hearing.

As a paper I presented at the 12th Congress of the International Commission on the Biological Effects of Noise discussed, the scientific evidence suggests that significant hearing loss (25-40 decibel hearing loss) is probably not part of normal aging, but is actually noise-induced hearing loss in the vast majority of cases. Research supporting this conclusion includes studies of hearing done in populations not exposed to noise, different rates of hearing loss in males vs. females, decades of occupational studies correlating increased noise exposure with greater hearing loss, and recent laboratory experiments showing the molecular, genetic, and sub-cellular structural mechanisms by which noise damages the auditory system.

If you protect your hearing now–by avoiding noise exposure or using hearing protection (ear plugs and ear muffs) if you can’t–you shouldn’t need a hearing aid in the future.

Preserved natural hearing…it’s better than a cheap hearing aid!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise can make you deaf

Photo credit: UrbanUrban_ru licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

And the Hindustan Times, knowing this, advises its readers: This Diwali, turn a deaf ear to noise.

Diwali is happening now, so enjoy the sigts–and some of the sounds–and don’t forget to pack some disposable earplugs for yourself, your friends, and family.

Hearing loss a big problem for farmers and ranchers

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report discusses the problem of occupational hearing loss in farmers and ranchers. You may be confused, thinking farmers and ranchers must surely work in some of the most peaceful workplaces that exist. And that may be true part of the time, but they also use heavy equipment (tractors, harvesters, etc.) for long periods of time. Says Dr. Richard Kopke, M.D., FACS, chief executive officer of the Hough Ear Institute in Oklahoma City, “[e]xposure to tractors, forage harvesters, chain saws, combines, grain dryers, even squealing pigs and guns, can lead to significant hearing loss.”

Dr. Kopke offers advice to farmers and ranchers on how to avoid hearing loss, including the same point I always make: if you have to raise your voice to be heard, the ambient noise is above 75 A-weighted decibels and hearing loss is occurring.

But it’s not just farmers and ranchers at risk of noise-induced hearing loss. It’s everyone.

Hearing is precious. Speech is the main way humans communicate and relate to one another. As Helen Keller said (paraphrasing), “blindness separates people from things, but deafness separates people from people.”

It’s National Protect Your Hearing Month. Once hearing is lost, the only treatment is a hearing aid (or a cochlear implant for the severely impaired). If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud! Turn down the volume, leave or move away, or insert ear plugs or use ear muff hearing protection.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Yet another reason to protect your hearing

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

October is National Protect Your Hearing Month, and Jane Brody’s column in the September 26, 2017, New York Times science section gives yet another reason to protect your hearing: hearing loss is tied to cognitive decline. In fact, studies are underway to determine if preventing hearing loss or treating hearing loss will prevent cognitive decline, because the correlation between hearing loss and cognitive decline is well established.

I try to lead a healthy life. I never smoked. I walk an hour or more every day. I eat 5-7 servings of fruits and vegetables daily. My BMI is 24.5. I wear a hat and long sleeves to protect me from the California sun. I always use my seat belt when driving or riding in a car. But I knew little about the importance of protecting my hearing.

Unfortunately, my ignorance hurt me. A one-time exposure to loud noise one New Year’s Eve left me with permanent tinnitus and hyperacusis. I started wearing ear plugs at movies and sports events, and dined out rarely because almost all restaurants are painfully noisy for me. Then three years ago, after reading a different piece in the New York Times science section on hyperacusis, I was motivated to become a noise activist and to learn more about preventing auditory damage.

Researchers are working on drugs and other treatments to reverse noise-induced hearing loss, tinnitus, and hyperacusis, but currently the only treatments for hearing loss are hearing aids or, for the most severely affected, cochlear implants. And hearing aids aren’t like eyeglasses or contact lenses for common visual problems. They just don’t work as well as people would like to help them understand speech.

When I learned how bad noise is for the ears, that the only safe noise exposure level to prevent hearing loss is 70 decibels daily average noise exposure, that most Americans are exposed to dangerously high noise levels in everyday life, that many American adults have noise-induced hearing loss because of the excess noise exposure, and that hearing aids don’t work particularly well in helping people with hearing loss understand speech, I realized I had to protect my hearing.

Now I use earplugs at the movies, at sports events, even if I have to go to a noisy restaurant. And if I use a power tool, or even bang in one nail with a hammer, I use ear plugs or ear muff hearing protection. You should, too!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Intense crowd noise sidelines German soccer star

 

Photo credit: Эдгар Брещанов licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Temporarily, at least. The Guardian reports that “Timo Werner is ‘feeling better’ after he asked to be substituted due to the intense noise created by the home supporters during RB Leipzig’s Champions League defeat to Besiktas on Tuesday.” Werner asked for the substitution only after he had already asked for, and received, ear plugs. The team manager, Ralph Hasenhüttl, said that he had “no choice but to accede to Werner’s request,” while noting that “[t]here was a deafening noise [and] at the start of the game we were a bit affected.”

We would say kudos to Team Manager Hasenhüttl for taking Werner’s request seriously, but The Guardian reports Hasenhüttl “appeared to criticise Werner’s request to be withdrawn so early,” hinting that he was disappointed.  And then he threw in a dig about needing to know that he can rely on his players.

Instead of questioning Werner’s reliability, perhaps Hasenhüttl should demand that stadium owners do something about damaging noise. Adding that we must note our surprise with Hasenhüttl’s comments given that in Germany noise regulation is taken very seriously.

How to reduce the risk of noise-induced hearing loss

Photo credit: Rex Roof licensed under CC by 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Reducing the risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) isn’t rocket science. It’s actually quite simple: avoid loud noise exposure and if you can’t do that, wear hearing protection.

This piece from Hear It Now, which claims to be the world’s #1 website on hearing and hearing loss, has a nice summary of practical tips. Click the link to see the full list of tips. Your ears will thank you!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Football stadium noise still here for another season

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

It’s been years since I’ve been to a college football game. The last games I attended were at the Los Angeles Coliseum, one of the quieter big-school stadiums, during the Pete Carroll era at USC. But I have read about and written a number of stories on stadium noise. Here is the latest story about the stadium noise at the University of Oregon’s Autzen Stadium.

This article, like every other article about stadium noise, says the same things: the noise is distracting so the coaching staff makes the team practice with loud music being blasted at them. Why is it understood that the coach should “condition” his team rather than demand that the noise level be controlled? Simply put, crowd noise shouldn’t be a factor in a football game. What Coach Riley (and everyone else attending the game) doesn’t know is that if it’s loud enough to impact play on the field, it’s loud enough to cause auditory damage.

The Quiet Coalition is still waiting for the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and its member colleges and universities–many of which have medical schools, schools of public health, audiology programs, or all three–to do something to protect the hearing of their student athletes and those attending the games. At least this University of Tennessee audiology professor understands the problem, which is why she recommends that students use earplugs when they attend UT football games. Kudos Dr. Patti Johnstone! But rather than having students block the noise, why not demand that the university control the noise in the first instance?

And as this article shows, stadium noise is a factor in professional games, too. In fact, stadium noise probably contributed to the Los Angeles Chargers recent loss in Denver.

Should football games be decided on the field, or by the home crowd purposefully making too much noise for the visiting team to hear the play being called? Whatever happened to good sportsmanship?

Sadly, it appears the NCAA, professional football teams, and stadium owners won’t address noise until and unless someone sues them because they developed sudden hearing loss or tinnitus after attending a game. Let’s hope that happens before many players and fans suffer significant hearing loss or develop tinnitus.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Here’s the best mass-media article on noise-induced hearing loss

Photo credit: rainy city licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

By David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Despite impacting 48 million Americans, noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has languished in the shadows for decades. But that’s changing! Check out the 17-page beautifully illustrated article in the September issue of Real Simple magazine*, a Time/Life publication with 8.5 million readers nationwide (that’s eight times larger than the New York Times readership of 1.1 million).

If you’ve been looking for a “quick overview” you can hand to friends and family who fail to understand America’s unrecognized problem with hearing loss—whether it’s your kids’ and their constant earbud (ab)use, friends who can’t understand conversations when you’re dining out, or an elderly relative who’s stopped paying attention and is increasingly depressed—this article should get the conversation started. And if they ask “what else can I read about this?” Tell them to look at this issue of Scientific American, new information from the Centers for Disease Control, and this one-page Fact Sheet on the health effects of noise that The Quiet Coalition (TQC) published in 2016.

It’s clear that NIHL is, as TQC’s chair, Daniel Fink, MD, says, “a growing problem in America nearing epidemic proportions.” But there’s a lot of work to do to get people (including the nation’s leaders) to understand that this is a legitimate public health problem. Frankly, the European Union and Asia are far ahead of us on this issue.

In the meantime, take heart: major media are beginning to notice! Congratulations to the editor of Real Simple for recognizing this growing health crisis. We are extremely grateful that her magazine cited three of TQC’s Steering Committee experts in this piece–Rick Neitzel, PhD, Arline Bronzaft, PhD, and Bradley Vite–and also
described two practical success stories. We hope Real Simple will continue to cover this issue and give it the attention it deserves.

We have only one complaint: the magazine erroneously states that 85 dB is the threshold of hearing damage. In fact, research has shown that permanent hearing damage starts at noise levels as low as 75 dB; furthermore, non-audiological health effects, such as cardiovascular effects, can be caused by noises as low as 55 dB.

*NOTE: the best place to find Real Simple magazine may be at the checkout counter at Whole Foods or a local book store. Or you can get it here.

Originally posted at The Quiet Coalition.

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

How to motivate millennials to protect their hearing at work

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition doesn’t spend much time worrying about occupational noise because our focus is on protecting the general public from noise. Workers’ ears are protected by regulations drafted and enforced by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and similar state agencies. Moreover, workers generally have health care for occupational injuries, and are compensated for work-related permanent damage (including hearing loss) by state-administered workers compensation systems. If occupational hearing loss is established, hearing aids may be provided for those with occupational hearing loss.

From time to time we will agree with the many observers who think that the occupational noise exposure limit–90 A-weighted decibels for 40 hours a week, 240 days a year, for 40 years, causing excess hearing loss in 25% of exposed workers–is set too high, but at least workers have that meager protection. There are no such protections for the public, and no compensation for hearing loss, either.

That said, we’re making an exception to share with you this well-written article in Occupational Health & Safety Magazine. It’s focused on preventing hearing loss in younger workers, but it provides good information for everyone who is concerned about their hearing.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

There is nothing inevitable or natural about chronic disease

Photo credit: Robbie Sproule licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This thoughtful piece talks about chronic disease, pointing out that it is not inevitable or natural. The author, Dr. Clayton Dalton, writes that:

[T]raditional cultures across the globe, from hunter-gatherers to pastoralists to horticulturists, have shown little evidence of chronic disease. It’s not because they don’t live long enough – recent analysis has found a common lifespan of up to 78 years among hunter-gatherers, once the bottlenecks of high mortality in infancy and young adulthood are bypassed. We can’t blame genes, since many of these groups appear to be more genetically susceptible to chronic disease than those of European descent.

So what is the reason for the absence of chronic illness among these cultures? “Evidence suggests it is how they live,” Dr. Dalton replies. And what factors do these different cultures share?  Dr. Dalton writes that the “common denominator [is] defined by the absence of modern banes: absence of processed foodstuffsabsence of sedentary lifestyle, and likely absence of chronic stressors.”

Dr. Dalton doesn’t specifically mention noise-induced hearing loss, but that’s another chronic disease that he could have included in his essay.

I spoke about this at the 12th Congress of the International Commission on the Biological Effects of Noise in Zürich in June. Similar to Dr. Dalton’s comments about hypertension and diabetes, I presented information showing that significant hearing loss is probably not part of normal aging, but represents noise-induced hearing loss.

A useful analogy for noise and hearing is sun and the skin. It turns out that skin and subcutaneous tissues sag as we age–that’s normal–but deep wrinkles, age spots, and skin cancers are the result of ultraviolet exposure. Similarly, I’m sure there are changes that occur in our hearing as we age, but profound hearing loss (25-40 decibel decrement in hearing) is most often the result of noise exposure.

In the end, how we live our lives matters. If we want to hear well into old age, we have to work to preserve our hearing all during our lives. How? It’s easy: avoid loud noise or wear ear protection if you can’t.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.