Noise-induced Hearing Loss (NIHL)

Loud fitness classes compromise instructors’ voices

Photo credit: Aberdeen Proving Ground licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The New York Times discusses how loud fitness classes are requiring instructors to shout over the motivational music and noise from gym equipment causing vocal cord damage. The article doesn’t discuss how the loud environment causes noise-induced hearing loss in instructors or those attending the exercise classes, but that’s a problem, too. Dangerous decibels at fitness centers may lead to hearing loss.

And here’s the funny thing: as best as I can tell, there are no studies in the sports medicine or exercise physiology literature showing that loud music increases performance, in any sport or exercise activity. Everyone thinks that loud music improves athletic performance, but that’s just a myth. Music with the right beat may help exercisers maintain a rhythm in sports where that’s important, such as rowing or running, but it doesn’t appear to help one lift more weight. So both the vocal damage and the auditory damage caused by loud gym music are completely unnecessary.

Both instructors and students should remember a simple rule: if it sounds too loud, it is too loud. If they can’t carry on a normal conversation without straining to speak or to be heard, the ambient noise is above 75 A-weighted decibels*, and that’s loud enough to cause auditory damage.

*A-weighting adjusts sound measurements to reflect the frequencies heard in human speech.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Keep your brain healthy by protecting your hearing

Photo credit: Silver Blu3 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Jane Brody’s recent column in The New York Times discusses the importance of good hearing for brain health. The exact mechanism isn’t understood, but the evidence is clear: even slight hearing loss has significant effects on brain function.

Research is under way to learn if using hearing aids prevents or delays the onset of dementia in those with hearing loss. In the meantime, we recommend avoiding loud noise exposure to prevent hearing loss, because noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Remember: if a noise sounds too loud, it is too loud. Leave the noisy environment or protect your hearing now, or wear hearing aids later.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Have electronics manufacturers hooked a generation on sound?

Photo credit: thekirbster licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The New York Times describes how Juul hooked a generation on nicotine, while regulators slept. Now millions are addicted and hundreds have died from vaping.

The Walkman was first marketed in 1979, followed by the iPod in 2001, the iPhone in 2007, and a host of similar devices shortly thereafter. Very effective advertising convinced people–young people especially–that they needed a constant sound track in their lives. Now people use their personal listening devices about 5 hours a day, often at high volumes.

Have electronics manufacturers hooked a generation–or two–on a constant stream of loud sound? Will the result be an epidemic of noise-induced hearing loss when today’s young people reach mid-life?

I hope someone will remember this warning if I’m not around. But if I am around, I will have no pleasure in saying “I told you so” to the millions of Americans coping with hearing loss.  We still have time to prevent today’s teenagers from suffering untreatable noise-induced hearing loss, but we have to act now.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Hearing loss from recreational sound exposure

Photo credit: Brett Sayles from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

RECOMMENDATIONS TO REDUCE HEARING LOSS FROM RECREATIONAL SOUND EXPOSURE

This detailed review article by Richard Neitzel, PhD, and Brian Fligor, PhD, in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America discusses the risk of noise-induced hearing loss from recreational sound exposure.

The abstract contains the important conclusions, which are amply supported by the article itself. They are:

  1. The recommended occupational exposure limit is 85 A-weighted decibels (dBA)*. Some exposed workers will develop hearing loss from this noise exposure. To eliminate the risk of hearing loss, a 24 hour average of 70 dB is recommended.
  2. It is possible that occupational noise exposure may have worse impacts on hearing than equal exposures to recreational noise. But the application of statistical hearing loss models developed from occupational noise data to estimate the impacts of recreational noise exposure is nevertheless warranted.
  3. A recreational noise exposure limit of 80 dBA for 8 hours, equivalent to 75 dBA for 24 hours, should prevent hearing loss for adults. For children and other vulnerable individuals, e.g., those who already have hearing loss, the lower exposure level of 75 dBA for 8 hours, or 70 dBA for 24 hours, is appropriate.

Common non-occupational noise exposure sources include public transit, appliances, power tools, personal music players and other personal listening devices, musical instrument practice and performance, concerts, sports events, and parties.

Protecting hearing is simple. Eliminate high noise exposures where possible, increase the distance between you and noise sources around you, and use hearing protection (earplugs or ear muffs).

Because if something sounds too loud, it is too loud, and your hearing is at risk.

*A-weighting adjusts noise measurements for the frequencies heard in human speech.
Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

CDC to run noise PSAs in Times Square

Photo credit: Jose Francisco Fernandez Saura at Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is “making noise about noise,” posting public service announcements on the world’s largest digital billboard at the proverbial “Crossroads of the World,” Times Square in New York City. The 15-second PSAs are scheduled for Thanksgiving week and the week before New Year’s Day.

The CDC’s public health message about the need for people to protect their hearing is very direct.

We hope everyone pays attention.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

More than Hearing Loss: APHA points to growing health effects of noise

Photo: Dr. Jennifer Deal giving her presentation on hearing loss and dementia

by Jamie L. Banks, PhD, MS, Executive Director, Quiet Communities, Inc., Co-Founder, The Quiet Coalition

Noise is not just a nuisance, it’s a growing public health hazard and action is long overdue.

That’s the message delivered at the November 2019 annual meeting of the American Public Health Association in Philadelphia, where doctors and other specialists identified evidence that “environmental noise” underlies a myriad of health problems reaching well beyond hearing loss.

The sources of this noise range widely, from aircraft takeoffs and landings, construction activity and loud music, to gas-powered lawn and garden equipment and widespread use of personal listening devices. The related health effects that were described include dementia, heart disease, diabetes, sleep disruption, and obesity, all brought about by the body’s reaction to noise-induced stress.

Dr. Leon Vinci, adjunct faculty at Drexel University and session moderator, opened the workshop by stating “there is a clear connection between excessive and unwanted noise with detriments to health and well-being.” The goals of the session were to raise awareness and issue a call to action.

Half the adult US population over age 60 “are impacted by a clinically meaningful hearing loss,” Dr. Jennifer Deal, a Johns Hopkins University epidemiologist, reported, “and there is growing recognition that hearing loss is associated with dementia—with up to 9 percent of global dementia cases attributed to hearing loss.”

Dr. Mathias Basner, associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Psychiatry, pointed also to the extent that unwanted noise contributes to cardiovascular disease. “While the effect of noise on cardiovascular disease risk is relatively small, it still constitutes an important public health problem as so many people are exposed to relevant noise levels,” he said. Sound insulation measures help mitigate some of the negative health effects of noise, but reducing noise at the source still makes the most sense.”

The title given to the APHA meeting session, “Environmental Noise: the New Second-Hand Smoke,” likened the problem to that which has prompted limits nationally on smoking tobacco in public places. Dr. Lucy Weinstein, co-chair of APHA’s Noise and Health Committee, said the reports give impetus to updating and acting on the organization’s 2013 noise policy statement that advocated federal action.

“The ways in which we define and measure noise contribute to [political] inattention to noise as a public health problem,” said Dr. Jamie Banks, executive director of Quiet Communities Inc., a Massachusetts-based nonprofit educational and advocacy organization. Banks cited a revised definition offered by Dr. Daniel Fink, founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, a QCI program. This change would elevate the threshold followed by engineers and physicists from “unwanted noise” to “unwanted and/or harmful sound.”

Furthermore, present methods for measuring sound do not necessarily reflect the real-world impact of noise on health and communities, like low-frequency components in landscape, construction, and air traffic noise, Banks said. As an example, harmful noise from a gas-powered leaf blower carries a longer distance than that from a battery electric blower even though both are rated at the same decibel level. “We have the technology to better understand the noise characteristics that impact health and community– it’s time to employ it.”

Dr. Arline Bronzaft, a City University of New York professor emerita and longtime advocate for controlling urban noise, argued that mounting scientific and medical evidence demands action. She urged APHA members to renew support for the organization’s noise control policy published in 2013.

“The evidence on noise as a public health hazard was convincing 40 years ago,” Bronzaft said. “Now, despite even stronger evidence linking noise to adverse effects on hearing, the cardiovascular system, metabolism, and psychological health, learning, and cognition, we are not moving forward aggressively enough to reduce the many sources of noise pollution in our communities.”

Jamie L. Banks, PhD, MSc, is the Executive Director of Quiet Communities, Inc. and the Program Director of The Quiet Coalition. She is an environmentalist and health care scientist dedicated to promoting clean, healthy, quiet, and sustainable landscape maintenance, construction, and agricultural practices. Dr. Banks has an extensive background in health outcomes and economics, environmental behavior, and policy.

 

Can a drug that repairs DNA prevent noise-induced hearing loss?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This press release from Northern Arizona University discusses a professor’s research on a new drug to see if it can prevent noise-induced hearing loss. Noise causes the production of reactive oxygen species in the cochlea, damaging delicate hair cells. The new drug, derived from a plant found in the Amazon, helps repair DNA and that might help prevent noise-induced hearing loss.

I’m always puzzled, though, that in the U.S. we try to find “a pill for every ill,” rather than focusing on preventing disease.

People want a pill to help them lose weight, rather than eating right and exercising.

They want creams to reduce wrinkles and age spots, rather than avoiding the sun.

And they want a pill to prevent hearing loss.

The professor doing the research, O’neil Guthrie, states “[e]ven after more than 100 years of research on hearing loss, there is still no widely accepted biomedical treatment or prevention.” I would have to disagree with him. I’m not sure what he means by a “biomedical treatment or prevention,” but avoiding loud noise, or using hearing protection, certainly prevents noise-induced hearing loss. And that’s what I recommend.

Because if something sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Prof. Rick Neitzel on Apple-backed research, restaurant noise

Photo credit: m01229 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Watch these two videos with our Quiet Coalition colleague, Professor Rick Neitzel, University of Michigan. In one video, he’s does some interesting noise-exposure work with a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reporter in a news segment that aired recently:

The loudest sounds to which this reporter was exposed over the course of a full day were in restaurants during lunch and dinner! It certainly looks like the restaurant noise problem is gaining public attention.

In the other video, he’s announcing a very exciting new research project for which he’s received funding from Apple:

This study will use Apple’s new sound-exposure app on the iWatch & iPhone.

Congratulations, Prof. Neitzel!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Univ. of Texas band members now wear ear plugs

Photo credit: Klobetime licensed under CC By-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The Daily Texan reports that Longhorn Band members now wear earplugs.

Noise-induced hearing loss in musicians of all types is an occupational or recreational hazard, regardless of what instrument or type of music one plays. In fact, music students have been used as subjects in studies of the effect of noise exposure on hearing, compared to those studying other subjects.

My advice is simple: all musicians–in high school and college bands and at the professional level–should use hearing protection.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Controlling the roar of the crowd

Photo credit: Gloria Bell licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The New York Times describes efforts by the Philadelphia Eagles and other professional and college sports teams to accommodate those with sensory challenges, “who can be most acutely affected by the overwhelming environments.”

Noise levels in many arenas and stadiums are high enough to cause auditory damage. The world record stadium noise is 142.2 A-weighted decibels (dBA)*, which exceeds the OSHA maximum permissible occupational noise exposure level of 140 dBA.

We wish the sports teams and the arenas and stadiums in which they play would do more to protect the hearing of everyone attending the game.

And since they probably won’t do this–crowd noise is weaponized to favor the home team, especially in football where it interferes with the visiting team hearing the quarterback calling the play–the public health authorities should step in.

*A-weighting adjusts sound measurements for the frequencies heard in human speech.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.