Noise-induced Hearing Loss (NIHL)

The CDC says “Protect your hearing”

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises everyone to protect his or hearing during July, which is Fireworks Safety Month:

Of course, we agree.

We only have two ears, and unlike our knees, they can’t be replaced.

I’ll go one step further and recommend that fireworks on July 4th be left to professionals and not used at home. Every year, people lose fingers or eyes because they or someone who loves them sets off fireworks at home, with disastrous consequences.

Please stay safe this fireworks season and protect your ears, too.

Thanks to the CDC for helping educate Americans about how to protect our auditory health.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Fireworks noise can damage your ears

Photo credit: ViTalko from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from KCBD in Texas discusses the dangers of fireworks noise for auditory health. The audiologist interviewed, Leigh Ann Reel, Ph.D., is especially concerned about impulsive noise, as from an explosion. One exposure at close range can cause permanent hearing loss, tinnitus, or hyperacusis.

Fire departments and public health authorities generally recommend leaving fireworks displays to the professionals, but in many states and localities personal use of fireworks is legal and enforcement of fireworks bans is spotty.

I would prefer quiet fireworks, as have been mandated in many parts of Europe, both for people and for their pets.

Please stay safe.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

If it makes more noise than a rake, protect your hearing

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just published this fact sheet about protecting your hearing when doing yard care. All power tools, whether gasoline or electric, make enough noise to damage hearing. In general, electric tools are quieter than those powered by two-stroke gasoline engines, and they also don’t produce noxious and toxic gaseous emissions.

One of the big technological advances in yard care in the last year or two is the widespread availability of powerful battery-powered yard care equipment, including leaf blowers, hedge trimmers, even lawnmowers. These are now available online or in any of the big-box home improvement stores. There’s no need to worry about extension cords or shock hazards.

Other than my wife, children, and grandchildren, gardening is my first love. From 2005-2014 I served on the board of the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers and Native Plants, Inc. When I was termed out from that service, I became a noise activist, focused on trying to make the world a quieter place. But I’d much rather be quietly working in my garden.

Raking leaves, trimming a plant, or pulling a weed, using hand tools as gardeners have done for centuries, is quiet and contemplative.

Only rarely will I use an electric pole trimmer to cut pesky branches that I can’t reach without getting on a ladder, but I’ll put in my earplugs first. Because if a yard care tool is louder than a rake or a pruning shears, it’s loud enough to cause hearing loss.

So when you are doing yard work, use earplugs or earmuff hearing protection now to avoid hearing aids later. And if you hire someone to maintain your landscape, insist that the workers are provided hearing protection. They are at special risk for hearing loss as well as other noise-related health problems.

Thanks to our friends at the CDC for helping educate the public about the dangers of noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The truth about children’s headphones

Photo credit: Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

In this piece for The New York Times parenting column, Joyce Cohen tells the truth about children’s headphones. The 85 decibel standard is not a safe listening volume for children, especially not without a specified exposure time.

In her article, Cohen cited The Quiet Coalition’s Rick Neitzel, PhD, associate chair of environmental health sciences at the University of Michigan, who said that “[t]reating 85 decibels as a safe level makes no sense at all,” adding that “[t]he 85-decibel number has achieved mythical status not because it is safe but because it is one of the few ways that occupational noise is regulated.”

I would add that a noise exposure standard that doesn’t even protect factory workers or heavy equipment operators from hearing loss is far too loud for a child’s delicate ears, which have to last her a whole lifetime. And an unknown factor is individual susceptibility. It’s impossible to predict whose ears are tough and whose ears are tender.

“The same noise dose has no apparent impact on some and a life-altering impact on others,” Bryan Pollard, president of the nonprofit Hyperacusis Research, told Cohen.

Consequences include not just hearing loss, but tinnitus, hyperacusis, and a sense of aural fullness. In her piece, Cohen interviewed pediatric audiologist Brian Fligor Ph.D. who summed things up: “We have done an atrocious job of teaching people to value their hearing.”

I hope Ms. Cohen’s writing will help parents know how dangerous headphones are for their children.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Masks interfere with understanding speech for people with hearing loss

Photo credit: Cleyder Duque from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Understanding speech can be difficult for people with hearing loss, and the requirement for wearing masks during the current COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates this problem. Mask wearing muffles speech, and it makes understanding difficult even for people without hearing loss, as many people with hearing loss consciously or unconsciously use lip reading and interpretation of expressions to help understand what is being said.

And sound decays according to the inverse square law, so the 6-foot social distancing requirement reduces sound volume compared to standing closer to the person one is conversing with.

As noted in this piece from CNN, there are things we can do to help communicate with people with hearing loss:

  • Face them and maintain eye contact when speaking.
  • Speak slowly and carefully.
  • Ask them to repeat back what they heard, so you can be sure they heard it correctly.

And If that doesn’t work, now there are masks being made with clear windows to allow the listener to see the speaker’s lips!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As I have written previously, I’m not a big believer in special days or months. As far as I’m concerned, every day is World Hearing Day, every month is Better Hearing and Speech Month, and, of course, this month every day is Mother’s Day!

But I have also acknowledged that it helps to have a special day or month to celebrate something or someone and to remind us of important events or topics.

Thanks to our friends at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for all the helpful information they have prepared on protecting our hearing, which they are sharing with the public every month.

Please stay safe, both from COVID and from noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Even with noise limits, loud noise at events still causes hearing damage

Photo credit: Wendy Wei from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article from the Netherlands reports that even with a regulatory maximum noise level for events and concerts, auditory damage still occurred. The Dutch Ministry of Public Health, Welfare, and Sports set the maximum noise level for events and concerts at 103 decibels (dB).

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure levels for noise are 1.5 hours at 100 A-weighted decibels (dBA) and one hour at 105 dBA. A-weighting adjusts the frequencies of sound for those heard in human speech. A-weighted sound measurements almost always are lower than unweighted measurements, with the exact difference depending on a variety of factors.

So 103 dB is pretty high, loud enough to cause hearing loss.

The problem with the Dutch noise levels was that the Dutch regulators somehow assumed that those attending loud events would be wearing hearing protection, but neglected to include this important requirement in information distributed to the public. About half of Dutch concertgoers never wear hearing protection, so they must be sustaining auditory damage, including noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus.

The trade association representing music venues, concert halls, and event organizers maintains that it is the responsibility of those attending events and concerts to protect their own hearing, but I disagree. I think it’s the responsibility of governments and public health authorities to protect the public, or at least to give them complete and accurate information. Not “caveat auditor”!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Warning labels work

Photo credit: Aeveraal licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Consumers want relevant information about products they buy, and warning labels work. That’s the message inherent in this New York Times report on food warning labels for salt, fat, sugar, and calories in Chile. Chile has one of the highest obesity rates in the world. With health care costs for obesity-related medical care soaring, the government decided to take action and began requiring black octagonal warning labels on the front of food packages. The laws also banned junk food sales in schools, and prohibited television ads for unhealthy food between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m.

Of course, the big multinational food companies who market candy, snacks, sodas, and fruit juices protested and lobbied against the legislation, but it passed and was signed into law.

Guess what? Junk food consumption is down 25% in Chile, and other countries are contemplating passing similar legislation.

I am convinced that if warning labels were required on personal listening devices and accessories like earbuds and headphones, people would use them less. I would suggest the following: WARNING: USE OF THIS DEVICE CAN CAUSE HEARING LOSS.  But I’m sure other wording might be more effective.

It’s obvious that the device manufacturers, like the junk food vendors, don’t care about consumers. All they care about is profits. It’s up to governments to protect their citizens, as Chile has done. That’s their job.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

AARP focuses on musicians and hearing loss

Photo credit: Alex G licensed under CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Noise-induced hearing loss afflicts people of all ages, but since it’s cumulative and incurable, the greatest burden falls on older people who have incessantly exposed themselves to loud noise in their careers and due to recreational choices. Such is the case with many stars in music and entertainment. AARP recently reviewed research from Germany that analyzed the heath insurance records of 7 million people from 2004 to 2008 and found that “working musicians are nearly four times more likely to suffer noise-induced hearing loss than those in any other profession”…. and they were “57% more likely to have tinnitus brought on by their work.”

Hearing Health magazine also recently reported on this and included a list of a dozen well-known performers who’ve given up music due to hearing loss.

So if you’re wondering why some of your favorite rock stars aren’t touring any more, it’s possible they simply can’t hear what they’re performing. Sure, everybody knows classical composer Ludwig von Beethoven wrote—and even conducted–some his finest work after he was completely deaf. But if you’ve read about him, you would also know how profoundly unhappy he was about it.

Our ability to hear isn’t self-repairing–once you’ve blown your ears, they’re gone for good. So it’s good news that AARP seems to be awakening to the problem of noise-induced hearing loss. They’re big and powerful enough to get things done in Washington DC, where the health effects of exposure to loud sound was swept under the rug nearly 40 years ago. It’s definitely time for AARP to pay attention!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Why are spin classes so loud (and does it matter)?

Photo credit: Aberdeen Proving Ground licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Why are spin classes so loud? This post on The Cut doesn’t really answer that question, but it does a nice job of explaining the dangers of excessive noise for auditory health.

A few years ago I had email exchanges with two researchers who study the effects of noise on athletic performance. Music with a specific beat can help rhythmic activities, like running or spinning at a constant pace, but despite common belief there is no evidence that loud music makes anyone run faster or lift more weight, or in this case spin faster.

Even if music does improve performance–or people think it improves their performance–those theoretical advantages are outweighed by almost certain auditory damage, including hearing loss and tinnitus.

I’m glad the author of this piece had a best friend who became an audiologist and educated her about the dangers of noise. Because if the noise in your spin class–or any exercise class, or really anywhere at all–sounds too loud, it is too loud.

And if the noise is loud enough to be painful, it’s dangerous for your ears. Period.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.