Noise Pollution

Dutch “singing road” drives locals nuts

Imagine the aural counterpart to this. Photo credit: Steven Lek licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Here is an amusing article about a singing road that bothered people living nearby and eventually was made to sound like a normal road.

Road traffic noise is a major contributor to noise pollution, obviously affecting those living closest to the road or highway.

Let’s hope that other cities and towns learn from the Dutch experience: people want quiet highways, not noisy ones.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noisy vacuum cleaners are still a problem in the EU

Photo credit: Phonical licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Despite European Union regulations about vacuum cleaner noise, this report documents that noisy vacuum cleaners are still a problem there.

As the Volkswagen diesel pollution fiasco shows, manufacturers will flout laws meant to protect the public until regulators act.

At least Europe has laws protecting the public from appliance noise. The U.S. has these laws on the books, but they have not been enforced since the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Noise Abatement and Control was defunded during the Reagan years.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

St. Pete mulls arming cops with sound meters

Photo credit: CityofStPete licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As this report shows, urban noise–in this case from restaurants, bars, and clubs–is a problem in St. Petersburg, Florida. So much so that the city council is considering supplying police officers with sound level meters, at an estimated cost of $175,000, and establishing noise limits for various locations at various times of the day.

There are two general patterns of noise laws in the U.S.: those that require measurements of sound levels, and those that allow the enforcement authorities to make a subjective assessment of whether the noise is too loud. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. Objective measurements allow precision and avoid accusations of bias, but the accuracy of the measurement can be questioned. Also, police officers in many jurisdictions have been reported to be reluctant to use the equipment, claiming that they don’t have the proper training.

On the other hand, subjective measurements allow authorities to act if the officer thinks the sound is too loud without arguments about the accuracy of the measurements, but open municipal authorities to accusations of bias in enforcement. In general, police authorities nationwide appear to be reluctant, at best, to enforce existing noise ordinances.

We would suggest that St. Petersburg save money by using one of the highly accurate free sound measurement apps available, e.g., SoundPrint or iHEARu, both of which allow location stamping, or relatively inexpensive sound measurement apps such as Faber Acoustical’s Sound Meter 4 and similar apps. [Note: Faber requires an iPhone and not an Android to be accurate, due to manufacturer variations in hardware and software specifications for Android phones.] Better yet, city council could enact enabling legislation to deputize any citizen with an approved app to report noise violations for enforcement purposes, providing the city with efficient, effective, and free noise monitoring.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

U.S. is a noisy guest that can’t leave soon enough

Photo credit: Buffaboy licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Canadians politely ask U.S. Navy to move noisy warship. The warship has been stuck in ice in Montreal’s harbor since Christmas Eve, reports Benjamin Raven of Michigan Live. One Montreal resident complained that the noise is “like the motor of a large truck that’s driving at a high speed,”  adding that the two generators the Navy is running 24/7 are “detestable.” Not exactly an effective way to win minds and hearts, yes?

 

Noise is bad for your heart

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Dr. Nandi, a health news commentator for television station WXYZ in Detroit, Michigan, explains why loud noise is bad for your heart.

Here’s a hint: it causes stress, and that causes high blood pressure, heart attack and heart failure, stroke, and death.

Dr. Nandi didn’t reference a recent article by Dr. Thomas Münzel from Germany in the current Journal of the American College of Cardiology, but I’m pretty sure that’s where he got his information. The Washington Post did speak with Dr. Münzel for its coverage of this topic.

Dr. Münzel’s new article is behind a paywall so only the abstract is available for free, but in it he and his colleagues updated information he wrote about in the European Heart Journal in 2014.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Is there a link between NYC noise and crime?

Photo credit: Tony Fischer licensed under CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The Crime Report examines a recent report about New York City noise by New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli. It’s fascinating read and carefully documents the chronic problem of noise in New York City along what the City has been doing (and not doing) to address it. More importantly, the article notes that “[n]oise complaints may be a clue to what else is going on in an apartment,” such as child or elder abuse or drug dealing, and, in any event, “not enforcing noise ordinances creates an environment that encourages lawbreaking.”

The author of the article is GrowNYC board member Arline Bronzaft, PhD, who is also a co-founder of The Quiet Coalition. In her article, Dr. Bronzaft discusses the link between crime and noise and why the City should devote more enforcement resources to the issue to improve the health, safety and welfare of New York City’s residents.

Thank you, Dr. Bronzaft for your passionate and long-term commitment to this subject!

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

It’s noisy out there!

Photo credit: Marc Smith licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This piece by author Teddy Wayne in the New York Times discusses “the cacophony produced by today’s mobile phone or tablet” and how we have somehow become inured to it. I’m not sure I understand all the points made, but I agree with this statement: “It’s noisy as heck out there.”

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Join us and others in measuring noise

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

There are now at least two apps to measure and report restaurant noise, and two apps to measure and report outdoor noise or urban soundscapes.

Anyone concerned about noise, as we are, should install one or more of these apps on his or her smart phone and start reporting noise levels.

All of these apps are free and rely on crowdsourcing to get city wide data. So down load one–or all of them–and help gather data to make your city or town a more tolerable place. Data from SoundPrint was used in a study presented at the 174th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America documenting excessive noise levels in restaurants and bars in New York City.

The apps are listed alphabetically in each category:

For restaurant noise:

iHearU

SoundPrint

For urban soundscapes:

Hush City App

NoiseScore

DISCLOSURE: I serve as Medical Advisor for SoundPrint.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.