Noise

Poor hearing associated with brain changes

Photo credit: Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Bryan Pollard, founder of Hyperacusis Research, Ltd., is an electrical engineer. Almost every time I have discussed something with him, he asks me an important question: “What’s the cause? What’s the effect?”

It is very easy to make a mistake thinking that an association is causal when it is not.

One of the best ways to avoid making this mistake is to study a phenomenon over time. If a factor in some research subjects is associated with changes over time, and absence of that factor is not associated with the change being examined, causality is more likely.

A good example of this question is the association of hearing loss with the development of dementia. Maybe hearing loss causes dementia because there is decreased nerve stimulation of certain parts of the brain related to auditory and speech processing, but maybe the brain changes are independent of hearing loss or perhaps even the cause of the hearing loss.

This recent report in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, with an accompanying editorial, uses the study of brain changes over time to try to answer this question. The research was done on the well-studied population of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Hearing tests and studies of brain tissue using specialized research techniques were done. Imaging was done by MRI at the National Institute of Aging.

Results showed that poorer hearing at baseline was associated with specific changes in portions of the brain processing auditory input, but not in other areas of the brain. The editorial notes the limitations of the study and its preliminary nature, but the report is another piece of the puzzle linking hearing loss to dementia.

For at least five years, I have been saying, “If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.” But based on the accumulating evidence of the dangers of noise for hearing loss, and then the impact of hearing loss on social function, economic success, and the development of dementia, I’ve decided to change my advice.

Now I would say, “If it sounds loud, it IS too loud.”

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Twenty Thousand Hertz podcast reaches big audiences with well-told stories about noise

Photo credit: Magda Ehlers from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Sound designer, Dallas Taylor produces a wonderful podcast called Twenty Thousand Hertz that is a joy to listen to. So far he has produced 45 episodes that cover a broad range of “stories behind the world’s most recognizable and interesting sounds.”

Recently he teamed up with TED and Apple Podcasts so now he’s reaching big audiences, which is terrific for those of us who are concerned about the effects of noise on health and environment.

A friend urged me to listen to an episode called “City That Never Sleeps,” in which Taylor interviews a New York City-based writer who discovered that her perpetual anxiety was the result of noise exposure, so she took some simple precautions that others may want to consider. The prodcasts includes a couple of compilations of “nature sounds” that you might want to bookmark. Enjoy!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Grant given to airport to lessen aircraft noise on nearby homes

Photo credit: Cliff licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

I was especially pleased to learn that the Piedmont Triad Airport Authority received a $1.9 million grant from the Department of Transportation to continue its program to lessen the impact of aircraft noise on the homes near the airport. The program to reduce noise impacts at residences was initiated eleven years ago when the FedEx cargo hub joined the airport.

In 2001, I was asked by the law firm representing residents concerned about the negative impacts from the development of the FedEx cargo hub to comment on the Federal Aviation Administration’s Environmental Impact Statement for the proposed runway associated with this hub. My comments explained that the EIS was seriously deficient in that it had minimal analyses of noise impacts on adults and children. Essentially, noise was defined as “an annoyance and a nuisance,” but there already was a growing body of literature that concluded that noise was a hazardous pollutant. The report also merely stated that noise “can disrupt classroom activities in schools,” even though studies had been published showing that noise can impede children’s learning. Finally, sleep was noted as being disrupted by noise when it was already known that loss of sleep may have serious consequences on the individual’s health and well-being.

I had concluded in my analysis of the environmental impact statement that the growing body of literature on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health was largely ignored and the authors of the statement relied on outdated studies and research in preparing the report.

I submitted my report and the hub opened years later in 2009. I now learned that noise mitigation accompanied the opening of the hub and the airport continued to work towards limiting impacts of aircraft noise on individuals living near the airport. I hope my statement in 2001 played a role in the Airport Authority’s recognition that airport-related noise does indeed have deleterious effects on mental and physical health.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Noise exposure leads to hyperglycemia

Photo credit: PhotoMIX Company from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from Diabetes Control discusses a newly published research paper showing that noise exposure was associated with the development of hyperglycemia. Diabetes Control notes that the study is only correlational and does not establish causality.

I have several issues with the paper, starting with the fact that the research was done in 2012 and only analyzed and published now. Occupational noise exposure was also strongly correlated with educational attainment and smoking, so it is possible that those factors and not noise exposure itself was the cause of the hyperglycemia.

But the results are consistent with prior studies done over the last two decades showing correlations between noise exposure and obesity and hyperglycemia in non-occupational settings.

Each similar report is like another tile in a mosaic, providing additional insight into the broader picture of the hazards of noise exposure.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Swiss grocery chain tests quiet hours

Photo credit: Roland zh licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Swiss Coop grocery chain is testing quiet hours in several stores in Switzerland, where the Spar chain already has quiet hours. Lights will be dimmed from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and there will be no announcements. This is being done to make shopping easier for those with autism. About 1% of the Swiss population is thought to be affected by autism spectrum disorders.

We think quiet hours are a good idea for lots of people, not just those with autism. These include people with hyperacusis, veterans and others with PTSD, parents with babies and toddlers, and really just anyone who is bothered by noise.

There is no reason for background music in grocery stores (or any retail stores) to be turned up to rock concert volumes. Announcments don’t need to be made at deafening volumes, either.

As many have observed, environmental modifications meant to help the disabled actually make life better and easier for us all.

The example I often cite is the ADA door handle, a lever style handle mandated by regulations implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act. These handles are easier for everyone to use than the old round door handles–not just people with arthritis or a weak grip from a stroke or neuromuscular disease, but children, older people, and those with both hands full who can use a wrist or elbow to turn the handle.

Similarly, ramps or curb cuts meant to help those with mobility disorders help parents pushing a stroller, delivery workers with carts full of packages, or repair technicians with tools and equipment on carts, as well as people like me with creaky knees.

And like ADA door handles and curb cuts, quieter retail stores will benefit everyone.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

How do we protect quiet?

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by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Noise in Europe has been a concern of health authorities there for some years. In 2011, the WHO’s European office issued a report on the global burden of disease from noise and in 2018 issued Environmental Noise Guidelines.

Despite regulatory efforts, the European Environmental Agency reports that there has been no progress in making Europe quieter. This report from Euronews cites statistics from the EEA that 20% of the European population is exposed to levels of noise considered harmful to health.

Traffic noise is a major environmental problem. The COVID-19 shutdowns, however, caused a wave of quiet to spread across the globe. Scientists are calling this “the anthropause.” We have reported on the effects of reductions in human activity on seismic levels and noise levels in cities and the oceans, and Euronews reports that people noticed birdsong more than before.

How do we protect quiet?

One way to protect quiet is to preserve quiet spaces. The Euronews report also mentions two efforts we have mentioned before, Gordon Hampton’s Quiet Parks International and Dr. Antonella Radicchi’s HushCity app, which Euronews reports is being used by city councils in Berlin, Germany and Limerick, Ireland.

The Environmental Protection Agency was tasked with eliminating noise pollution in the U.S. by the Noise Control Act of 1972 and the Quiet Communities Act of 1978, but federal noise enforcement activities ceased during the Reagan era when the EPA’s Office of Noise Abatement and Control was defunded.

We hope that a future president will recognize the importance of quiet and restore funding for noise abatement and control in the U.S.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

How not to deal with a noisy neighbor

Photo credit: Weatherman90 licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

It was not surprising to read that Toto’s Steve Lukather decided to deal with his neighbor’s noisy landscaping equipment disturbing him in the early morning hours by unleashing “a loud solo before screaming ‘Good morning’ in the direction of his hedges.” As the Board member of GrowNYC who responds to noise queries, New Yorkers often call me to complain about noisy neighbors. Too often, they have told me that they want to bang upstairs with brooms to reciprocate for being awakened in the early morning with loud footsteps along uncarpeted floors. I am certain these callers would applaud Lukather’s actions as did many of his followers.

Before offering to assist New York City residents who call me, I urge them not to take the route that Lukather did. I add that one should not engage in the same bad behavior displayed by their neighbors to resolve the noise problem. I guess as the wife of an attorney, and the mother of two attorneys, I know that the law doesn’t look favorably on trying to stop inappropriate behavior by using inappropriate behavior.

While not resolving all the neighbor noise problems that are brought to my attention, I have been successful a large number of times. Sometimes it is a matter of having the complainant approach the neighbor and discussing the noise situation with literature noting the deleterious impacts of noise on health. At other times, it is asking the landlord or managing agent to handle the matter under the “warranty of habitability” clause of leases that provide tenants with the right to “reasonable quiet” in their apartments.

Let me stress that noises are hazardous to one’s mental and physical well-being and should not be dismissed. Before calling me, many of the New Yorkers with whom I have spoken told me that they have tried speaking with neighbors, calling 311, and asking local officials for assistance with the noise matter. When no relief follows, they very much want to handle the noise matter as Lukather did. And I am certain that many New Yorkers whom I have not heard from do.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Bobcat unveils quiet, electrically powered excavator

Photo credit: Michel Curi licensed uncer CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

One of the noisiest of America’s largest industries is construction and maintenance. It turns out that industry has the lowest “reinvestment rate,” i.e., spending on innovation, research, and development, of any major industry in the country. So resistance to innovation and change is deeply entrenched. But sometimes, change happens despite industry resistance. That’s what happening at Bobcat, which has teamed up with another company to unveil an electrically-powered
excavator.

We want to congratulate our sister program, Quiet Communities, which pioneered a change-management approach specifically to accelerate the rate of change in one deeply change-resistant industry, outdoor power equipment. For six years Quiet Communities has been fighting to get outdoor power equipment manufacturers and users–the companies that build and use gas-powered equipment, including those leaf blowers we all love to hate–to adopt new, cleaner and quieter electrically-powered equipment. Now its happening.

We call this approach “technology pull,” which is how America has always gone about achieving large-scale, systemic change. Essentially, new technologies come along, sometimes whole clusters of them.  Examples include railroads, electricity, telegraph, telephone, gasoline engines, aircraft, radio, television, and the like. All of those were all part of one gigantic, historic wave called the industrial revolution.

And now we’re living through the post-industrial revolution driven led by information technology and the emergence of alternative energy sources like electric motors. Arguably, America’s “secret sauce,” the way this country built the world’s most powerful economy, has always been by encouraging engineers and technologists to invent the next big thing faster than anybody else.

And now, finally, America’s change-resistant, stubbornly resistant outdoor power equipment manufacturers are getting the message. Congratulations to them! I have no stake in this innovation partnership between Bobcat and Green Machine, other than our own goal of making America a cleaner, quieter place to live. But frankly, I’m thrilled to see this happen.

Now if only we could convince the federal government to let the aircraft industry move faster toward electrically-powered airplanes (about which we’ve written already), then maybe we can all look forward to seeing a quieter, less polluted future ahead of us.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

A new definition of noise redux

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by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Thanks to the editorial staff at Hearing Health Foundation and its Hearing Health magazine, I was able to adapt my paper that first appeared in Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics.

The paper, based on a presentation I made at the Acoustical Society of America meeting in San Diego in December 2019, offers a new definition of noise: Noise is unwanted and/or harmful sound.

The most common definition of noise is merely “noise is unwanted sound,” but that definition omits the unfortunate reality that even wanted sound–whether a rock concert, using a personal listening device at volumes high enough to compensate for ambient noise, or activities like woodworking, motor sports, or shooting sports–can cause hearing loss and other auditory disorders.

Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics graciously allowed me to adapt the paper for the Summer 2020 issue of Hearing Health magazine.

Between the appearance of the two articles, inspired by the young Black woman who persuaded the Merriam-Webster dictionary folks to update their definition of racism, I reached out to them about updating their definition of noise. The CNN report states that she wasn’t expecting much when she sent her email, but look what happened.

I haven’t heard back from Merriam-Webster, but I’m hoping that lightning might strike twice.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

How noise affects our brains

Image credit: Pete Linforth from Pixabay

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Everyone acquires information by different means. Some people talk to friends, some people do an internet search, some read newspapers or magazines, and these days many listen to podcasts.

I am too impatient to listen to podcasts–I can read much faster than anyone can talk–and I have hyperacusis, so I don’t listen to podcasts on my smartphone while walking around. I prefer to obtain information by reading.

But from time to time I make an exception, and this wonderful podcast is one of those exceptions.

On his “This Is Your Brain” podcast, Dr. Phil Steig interviews our friend Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, MSc, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the Behavioral Regulation and Health Section. Dr. Basner is one of the world’s experts on the effects of noise on sleep and human health, and in this podcast he shares his knowledge about the effects of noise on hearing and the brain.

I listened on my computer. It’s only 19 minutes long, and well worth your time.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.