Noise

David Owen’s new book on how noise is destroying our hearing

Photo by Laurie Gaboardi, courtesy of David Owen

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

NPR interviews New Yorker staff writer David Owen about his new book, “Volume Control.” Owen makes several salient points:

  • Hearing loss in old age is the result of cumulative noise exposure.
  • Hearing loss doesn’t just affect hearing, but affects general health and function. People with hearing loss have more frequent hospitalizations, more accidents, and die younger.
  • Hearing loss and tinnitus are the leading service-connected disabilities for military veterans.
  • There is no cure for tinnitus and hyperacusis can be an even worse problem, without treatment or cure.

My advice is that you must protect your hearing. Because if something sounds too loud, it is too loud.

We only have two ears. Wear earplugs now, or hearing aids later.

DISCLOSURE: I was interviewed by David Owen for his The New Yorker article, “Is Noise Pollution the Next Big Public-Health Crisis?,” and I am acknowledged in his book.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Controlling the roar of the crowd

Photo credit: Gloria Bell licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The New York Times describes efforts by the Philadelphia Eagles and other professional and college sports teams to accommodate those with sensory challenges, “who can be most acutely affected by the overwhelming environments.”

Noise levels in many arenas and stadiums are high enough to cause auditory damage. The world record stadium noise is 142.2 A-weighted decibels (dBA)*, which exceeds the OSHA maximum permissible occupational noise exposure level of 140 dBA.

We wish the sports teams and the arenas and stadiums in which they play would do more to protect the hearing of everyone attending the game.

And since they probably won’t do this–crowd noise is weaponized to favor the home team, especially in football where it interferes with the visiting team hearing the quarterback calling the play–the public health authorities should step in.

*A-weighting adjusts sound measurements for the frequencies heard in human speech.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Noise disrupts sleep. Could this be linked to Alzheimer’s?

Photo credit: Alyssa L. Miller licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The most common definition of noise is “noise is unwanted sound.” We at The Quiet Coalition recently came up with a new definition: noise is unwanted and/or harmful sound. The specific evidence-based sound levels associated with adverse health and public health hazards are summarized in my article in Acoustics Today, “Ambient Noise Is ‘The New Secondhand Smoke.'”

Sounds as low as 30-35 A-weighted decibels* can disrupt sleep. Uninterrupted sleep is important for both daily function and health. Nighttime noise is increasing, caused by aircraft noise, road traffic noise, emergency vehicle sirens, horn-based alerts, and sounds from clubs, bars, and concerts, with the specific noise source(s) depending on where people live.

It has been known since 2013 that sleep is necessary for cellular cleaning functions in the brain. A new study, reported by NPR, extends this research to Alzheimer’s disease. It has been known for some time that poor sleep is associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and patients with Alzheimer’s disease don’t sleep well. The new study shows that there are waves of cerebrospinal fluid occurring every 20 seconds during sleep, preceded by electrical activity. The electrical waves appear as slow waves on an EEG. Those with Alzheimer’s disease have fewer slow waves on their EEGs.

I have only read the NPR report, not the underlying article in Science, and I’m not 100% sure the cause-effect relationship between sleep disruption and Alzheimer’s has been clearly established. Which really came first, the sleep problems or the Alzheimer’s disease? Nonetheless, the study underscores the importance of a good night’s sleep.

Noise pollution is a public health problem. And one wonders if the increase in Alzheimer’s disease is due in part to increased nighttime noise levels.

*A-weighting adjusts sound measurements to reflect the frequencies heard in human speech.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

World Economic Forum honors TQC scientific advisor, Dr. A. Radicchi!

Hush City app’s icon (c) Antonella Radicchi 2017

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition just received news that the Hush City app, developed by Dr. Antonella Radicchi, our scientific advisor and Senior Research Associate and HEAD-Genuit Foundation Fellow at the Technical University of Berlin, has been recognised and honored by the World Economic Forum among the “4 clever projects fighting noise pollution around the globe.”

Hush City app is a free citizen science mobile app that helps crowdsourcing quiet areas worldwide.

Watch the WEF’s video by clicking here and scrolling to the end of the story.

In the spring 2019, Dr. Radicchi was on a research stay at New York University in New York City, working with other anti-noise advocates there. We were pleased to co-host her stay in America.

Congratulations, Antonella! We firmly believe in crowdsourcing data about quiet areas as a “democratic” as well as scientifically valid method that will start to make the world a quieter place for all.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Japanese residents living near U.S. air base compensated for noise

Photo credit: Hideyuki KAMON licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report in the Japan Times covers legal proceedings about a court case in Japan, where residents living near the Iwakuni Air Base are subject to noise from military jets. The Hiroshima High Court upheld a prior ruling, raising the damage award to 735 million yen (approx. $6,795,810).

We hope there will be similar legal cases in the U.S., but we hope even more that quieter jet engines will be required for all airplanes and flight paths will be adjusted to minimize noise exposure for those living near airports.

Thanks to Yishane Lee, editor of Hearing Health magazine, a publication of the Hearing Health Foundation, for informing us of this article.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Google’s Wing begins pilot drone delivery in the U.S.

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Watch out for this on the roof of your local strip mall: Google’s Alphabet drone-delivery division, called Wing is now conducting pilot drone-delivery programs in the U.S. They’ve already done so in Australia and elsewhere (where the program was roundly criticized as noisy and intrusive). But negative feedback elsewhere isn’t stopping them, and the Federal Aviation Administration–a division of the all-powerful Department to Transportation, presided over by Senate Leader Mitch McConnell’s wife–has authorized a range of pilot programs across the U.S. to explore driverless drone deliveries.

Here’s a video of the Wing delivery drone in action:

See those 16 or 17 rotors? Thats four times the number of rotors you’d find on a hobbyist drone at your local park. That translates to four times the amount of noise! Who’s watching out for this?

We’ve encouraged the Congressional Quiet Skies Caucus to take a look at this emerging problem. Their only prior work was on airport noise from commercial jet aircraft—an area where they seem to have made some progress, though it hasn’t translated into improvements yet for neighborhoods adjacent to airports across the country.

Now they need to get focused on this drone delivery problem. Because in the very near future, when you pull into Whole Foods or CVS, there’s a distinct possibility that their roofs will be noisy mini-airports for the delivery of lattes, pizzas, veggies, shampoo and prescription drugs to your neighbors. So you’ll get the noise where you’re shopping and in your neighbors’ yards.

Here comes the next chapter in Big Tech’s vision of America’s future: driverless drone delivery—and it’s just invaded America’s shores after highly-criticized pilot programs elsewhere.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

The loudest bird in the world

Photo credit: Daderot, changes by Kersti have dedicated this photo to the public domain

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The New York Times discusses a species of bellbird that is the loudest bird in the world. How loud? The white bellbird makes noise at 125 decibels.

Hear for youself (reduce the volume or remove your headphones):

I’m glad it lives only in the Amazon, and not near me.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

A call for quiet fireworks

As Guy Fawkes day approaches ushering in bonfire season in the UK, a Bradford city councillor has called for the council to consider making a law to restrict loud fireworks displays and require quiet ones.

We have written about quiet fireworks before, noting that noise is part of the design of traditional fireworks. But as Councillor Jeannette Sunderland asserts, “[t]he manufacture of fireworks has progressed and it is now possible to hold displays and events of quieter fireworks which can create ‘quieter’ displays, ‘low noise’ displays or silent displays which reduce the noise nuisance and impact on others in terms of acoustic stress.”

It’s not impossible to remove some noise from our lives without giving up things that people enjoy.  Fireworks are, primarily, a visual display.  While there are those who may love the noise that accompanies the brilliant display, by limiting it the experience can be enjoyed by many more people.

Then again, if we consider the overall impact of a fireworks display, maybe it’s time to move on to something a bit less destructive.

New York City tries to deal (again) with nighttime contruction noise

Photo credit: Tomwsulcer has dedicated this photo to the public domain

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition, and Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

The New York Times reports that the building boom in New York City has been accompanied by a “noise boom,” especially with the increase in overnight work.

A construction boom, given the difficulty of doing construction work in Manhattan, has led to an increase in the number of variances being requested to allow nighttime construction work. Although the New York City Noise Code includes a section pertaining to construction noise rules and regulations, it is the Department of Buildings that oversees the issuance of variances to the Noise Code rules and regulations.

Councilwoman Carlina Rivera understands the adverse health impacts of noise. As reported in the New York Times, she has introduced a bill to the City Council that would limit construction work to no earlier than 6 a.m. and no later than 10 p.m. on weekdays, with weekend construction limited to 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., with some variances allowed for utility and government projects. As to whether this legislation will pass, is a difficult question to answer in a city where developers and the real estate industry have strong political influence.

Ms. Rivera asserted that the Department of Buildings does not have enough employees to review all the permit applications for variances it receives. As a result, it may have issued variances without much consideration about how construction noise would affect those living nearby. There was, sadly, no indication in this story that the Department of Buildings asked for additional staff to more effectively review the applications. The one response from a department spokesman, was that “no one likes construction” but that the after-hours permits were “necessary to a growing city.”  Such a statement appears to be dismissive of the accepted knowledge that noise is hazardous to both mental and physical health.

What is clear in the literature with respect to health and well-being is how dependent our health is on a “good night’s sleep,” something that is certainly being denied to those exposed to the growing New York City nighttime construction noise. Furthermore, a city like New York, proud of its diverse and talented workforce, should also be aware of the fact a loss of sleep can decrease work productivity the next day.

We wish Ms. Rivera success, and a quieter night to all in New York City.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.