Quality of Life

Montana county looks to limit noisy bitcoin mining

 

The Independent Record reports that Missoula County is considering limiting bitcoin mining operations “amid concerns over noise, the amount of energy used by the cryptocurrency mining operations, and how that energy consumption could affect consumers.” Turns out mining virtual currency causes real life problems, like imposing a permanent hum on the neighbors generated by “the hundreds of fan blades” used to cool the mining factories.

But as much as we are appalled by ridiculous activities that make noise, this is quantifiably more horrible: The Independent Record states that “mining a single bitcoin takes as much electricity as it does to power the average American household for two years.”

Noise is usually a sign that something is wrong in a system.  That seems loud and clear here.

Is your noise making me fat? – Part II

Photo credit: Magnus D licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I used to joke that a great headline to get attention paid to noise would be the one at the top of the page, based on research showing that transportation noise increases stress hormones, in turn leading to obesity and diabetes. ( Here’s a link to one of the studies showing people exposed to transportation noise had larger waist circumferences.)

But this report shows that in addition to making it difficult for patrons to carry on conversations while dining, loud background music in restaurant increases the selection of higher calorie “comfort food” menu options.

It’s a rare restaurant these days where one can converse–if one can converse at all–without straining to speak or to be heard.

That means that the ambient noise is above 75 A-weighted decibels, which is also the auditory injury threshold, and that means that diners’ hearing is being damaged.

Remember: if it sounds too loud, it is too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

A novel approach to addressing noise pollution

 

Photo credit: The All-Nite Images licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

A Brooklyn startup ‘listens in’ on downtown Brooklyn noise. Mary Frost, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, reports that “NYU’s startup Sounds of New York City is developing an acoustic sensor network and installing it on lampposts along Fulton Street.”  The sensors are a “collaboration between Downtown Brooklyn Partnership and local tech startups” that are working together to bring “smart city” technology to downtown Brooklyn.

No doubt the data Sounds of New York City collects will be useful for those who want the city to do more to address noise.  But the startup wants to do more, as it aims to analyze “patterns of noise” across the city and–this is exciting–“maybe track violations through an automated system.”

The best of luck to you Sounds of New York City.

Loud motorcycle noise is a health hazard

The photographer, Muzzi Katz, has dedicated this image to the public domain.

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article out of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the home of Harley-Davidson, discusses motorcycle noise as either a sweet sound or a nuisance.

Motorcycle noise is neither. It is a health and public health hazard.

Most motorcycles are noisy enough to cause hearing loss, both to riders and to passers-by.  And most motorcycle noise is loud enough to disrupt sleep. Uninterrupted sleep is important for good health.

Many states have specific laws governing vehicle noise, including motorcycle exhausts, and most cities have noise ordinances as well.

If motorcycle noise is a problem in your city or town, ask your mayor and city council member and police chief to enforce local and state noise ordinances.

I just sent an email to the mayor of my city about this. You should do the same where you live.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Dr. Erica Walker takes on Boston’s noise

Photo credit: Robbie Shade licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Boston Globe looks at the important work conducted by Dr. Erica Walker, research scientist and creator of the NoiseScore app, who is tackling Boston’s noise head on.  As writer Chris Berdik states, “Walker may know more about noise in Boston than anyone.” And because she also knows about the dangers of noise, Walker is dedicated to informing the public about this “little-studied pollution.”  As Berdik writes:

New research by Walker and others suggests that noise doesn’t just hurt our hearing. Chronic noise exposure floods the body with stress hormones that can lead to higher blood pressure, more blood clots, and a greater likelihood of heart problems and stroke.

Berdik says that Walker believes public health researchers “don’t take noise seriously enough, particularly in the United States,” and that her goal it to change that by “starting with creating a more comprehensive measure of noise exposure”

We applaud Dr. Walker’s hard work and dedication in protecting our public health.

London’s Heathrow ranks airlines by noise ratings

Photo credit: Paul Hudson licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Many of us frequent flyers use Heathrow (airport code LHR) as an entry point to Europe, especially those of us from the west coast.

In 2017, LHR ranked was the seventh busiest airport in the world, with 78 million passengers passing through it.

LHR just released noise rankings for the airlines using its space. There are a number of rankings–noise per passenger seat and noise ratings by airplanes flown are two–but what is probably the most important noise rating, number of noisy flights per airline or average noise rating per flight for each airline, is missing.

Maybe an American airport or the Federal Aviation Administration can lead the way on these measurements in the U.S.?

Just a thought!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Federal judge upholds city’s noise ordinance

Photo credit: Tony Hisgett licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

From time to time The Quiet Coalition gets inquiries or requests for help in dealing with local noise problems. Each one of these situations is very different, from airplane noise to noise from factories, and TQC can only offer general advice:

1. Research the local noise ordinances.

2. Figure out which person at which agency is responsible for handling noise complaints.

3. Document each and every violation of the noise ordinance, with copies to elected officials for the jurisdiction(s) involved and to local news media.

4. Involve local news media if possible.

5. Involve local schools with noise measurement, documentation, and reporting being part of class projects beginning with fourth or fifth grade and going up through high school.

While this advice doesn’t always get the result the inquirer wants, things are beginning to change and decision makers–whether at the city, state, or federal level–are starting to take noise seriously.  And as this report shows, sometimes the courts will uphold enforcement of local noise control and nuisance abatement ordinances.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Tips on fixing annoying noise issues at home

 

Photo credit: FWStudio from Pexels

Nancy Mitchell, Apartment Therapy, offers tips on how to quiet five annoying noises at home, from squeaky floorboards and a creaky door to a noisy radiator.  Click the link to learn about what you can do to make your home a quieter, relaxing oasis.

Calgary councillors take aim at motorcycle noise

 

Photo credit: Calgary Reviews licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Calgary Herald Editorial Board writes that “city politicians are once again turning their attention to the excessive sound of motorcycles and other vehicles with noisy mufflers and other needless modifications that are an irritant to all but the self-absorbed owners themselves.”  This year, the pols are looking at Edmonton, where there is a test underway that uses “a new photo-radar-style noise gun [that] is showing promise.”

If Edmonston’s test is successful, it’s possible that Calgary will adopt the technology and both cities could consider automating the device “to issue fines to too-loud users of public roads, including at nighttime, when the disturbance is particularly upsetting to residents trying to get a good night’s sleep.”

And the city of Calgary will heave a sigh of relief.

 

Using “thick data” to make a smart city

 

Photo credit: IK’s World Trip licensed under CC BY 2.0

Adrian Smith, The Guardian, writes about Barcelona, a “pioneering Smart City,” that has been using sensors in various city infrastructure along with citizens via mobile devices “to monitor and anticipate urban phenomena in new ways, and, so the argument goes, efficiently manage urban activity for the benefit of ‘smart citizens.’”

Enter the residents living around Plaça de Sol, a popular square that has become, for residents, a bit too popular, especially with bars, restaurants, hotels, and tourists.  And with the addition of more bars, restaurants, and tourists, comes more noise, always. So back in 2017, a group of technology activists got in touch with residents and started a project under which residents were given “tools to measure noise levels, compare them with officially permissible levels,” with the aim of reducing noise in the square.

And what followed shows how complicated the embrace of thick data and citizen engagement can be, as the residents’ desire to reduce noise has to be considered along with the needs of bar and restaurant owners.  As a city councilman pointed out:

Beyond economic issues are questions of rights to public space, young peoples’ needs to socialise, neighbouring squares worried about displaced activity, the Council’s vision for Gràcia, and of course, the residents suffering the noise.

Click the link above to read this fascinating article.