Sound art

The Sounds of Protest

Photo credit: John Hilliard licensed under CC BY 2.0

are getting louder. Alastair Boone, City Lab, writes about Stuart Fowkes, the founder of a new project called Protest and Politics, “a sound map that documents the sounds of protest, as they grow louder in cities around the world.” Boone reports that “from Brexit to Trump’s election, the past year has known more protests than many before it,” but he adds that Fowkes’ project includes sound from as early as the Gulf War in 1991.

Protest and Politics is part of a larger program founded by Fowkes, Cities and Memory, which is essentially a world sound map. What makes his new project different is that it is “the first to document the sounds of history.” “What’s great about this project is that it’s little slices of history,” Fowkes explains.

Listening to his recordings of protests in the United States, one can hear the same chants across the country. The “same sort of unity is present abroad,” where “casserole protesting, for example, using pots and pans to make noise in lieu of voice,” which originated in Latin America, is also heard in recordings from Europe and Canada.

Taken together, Fowkes hears “something of a unified voice that’s becoming stronger, becoming louder.” He concludes that “[m]ore and more, people feel like they’re part of something.” And that is what Fowkes hopes people take away from listening to his project. Says Fowkes, “I think there’s a general feeling that we need to rise up and make our voices heard.”

 

Being Hear

 

Photo credit: Michael Gäbler licensed under CC BY 3.0

Watch this excerpt from the new film “Being Hear,” about sound recordist and ecologist Gordon Hempton. The film, “[a]t once a profile, a guided meditation and a call to action,” follows Hempton as he records sounds on Washington State’s Olympia Peninsula, a national park that contains the continental U.S.’s only rainforest. Says Hempton,” Nature is music. I’m not asking you to get all theoretical here — I saying, just listen.”

To hear more of Gordon Hempton’s captured sounds of nature, check out his YouTube channel.

How Much Silence Is Too Much?

Photo credit: Brian Oslinker

Daniel McDermon found out when he went to see a work by the artist Doug Wheeler entitled “PSAD Synthetic Desert III.”  What is this installation? It’s “a dead-silent room at the top of the Guggenheim Museum.” How did Wheeler creat a “dead-silent room?” According to McDermon, the inside of the room contains “enough noise-canceling material to make it probably the quietest place you’ll ever go, unless you’re an astronaut or a sound engineer.”

We think this sounds delightful, but McDermon states that too much hush can be unsettling.  He writes that Wheeler told his colleague that “[i]n a supersilent anechoic chamber, the most that most people can endure is about 40 minutes before they start going batty.”  But no worries about losing your composure in Wheeler’s installation, as McDermon writes that “Synthetic Desert” is not “going batty” quiet. Wheeler estimates that his piece may reach as low as 10 decibels, whereas an anechoic chamber can reach “noise levels below the threshold of human hearing.”

McDermon vivdly describes his visit to Synthetic Desert, and it is fascinating. Do click the link above to read his review.

If you are interested in experiencing it yourself, PSAD Synthetic Desert III will be available through August 2nd at the Guggenheim Museum. A timed ticket is required.

Does the sun make a sound?

Jillian Scudder, Forbes, asks What Does The Sun Sound Like?  Scudder, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Astrophysics, notes that a major problem with recording sounds in space is that “there’s no atmosphere for sound waves to travel through, so any pressure waves an object may be producing will be instantly silenced without a medium to compress.”  But, she adds, “there are other ways of recording information which can be translated into a sound; the easiest one is vibrations.”  Enter sonification,”a booming area of data manipulation — it’s another face of the data visualization scene; instead of presenting the information visually, you can code it audibly, and listen to it over time.”

Click the link above to hear examples of sonification of the sun.