Sound as historic artifact

Explore the sounds of Yellowstone

Photo credit: Frank-2.0 has dedicated this photo the public domain

Cities and Memories has launched their newest project, a sound map of Yellowstone national park. Once again, Cities and Memories provides captured sounds of “everything from grizzly bears and coyotes through to the park’s iconic geysers and steam vents,” and couples them with reimagined sound pieces by artists from around the world. Be sure to set aside a few hours to explore the sound map!

Archaeoacoustics, the acoustics of archeological sites

Photo credit: Colin W licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Silencity recently published a post about sounds that have been lost to humans, e.g., the call of the wooly mammoth, because they were heard before sound recording technology had developed.

This article from Acoustics Today discusses the field of archaeoacoustics. Anthropologists and acoustic engineers are exploring ancient sites where specific sounds were thought to be important to humans, and recreating those sound environments.

Sounds are important to humans today, and must have been even more significant in ancient times, when the natural environment was much quieter and sounds could be heard at a much greater distance.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Taking a short break

Please enjoy some stories from this past year, like this one on the search for lost sounds:

Photo credit: Stas Knop from Pexels

Nicholas Rivero, Quartz, writes about sounds that have been lost to time because humans have only had the ability to record sound since the mid-1800s.  Says Rivero:

That means a great many noises—the call of the wooly mammoth, the first words of early humans, the music of ancient cultures—have fallen silent forever. But thanks to the efforts of a dedicated cohort of scientists, historians, programmers, musicians, and everyday enthusiasts, some lost sounds are making a comeback.

And what follows is a romp through the past, accompanied by links to YouTube videos that let you hear the reconstructed sounds and learn how they were rediscovered. Well worth the click.

Thanks to Lisa Kothari for the link.

In search of lost sounds

Photo credit: Stas Knop from Pexels

Nicholas Rivero, Quartz, writes about sounds that have been lost to time because humans have only had the ability to record sound since the mid-1800s.  Says Rivero:

That means a great many noises—the call of the wooly mammoth, the first words of early humans, the music of ancient cultures—have fallen silent forever. But thanks to the efforts of a dedicated cohort of scientists, historians, programmers, musicians, and everyday enthusiasts, some lost sounds are making a comeback.

And what follows is a romp through the past, accompanied by links to YouTube videos that let you hear the reconstructed sounds and learn how they were rediscovered. Well worth the click.

Thanks to Lisa Kothari for the link.

What is sound tourism?

Photo credit: Ibrahim Asad from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

When Silencity wrote about the sea organ in Zadar, Croatia, I said to my wife, “we were there!” And I learned that there is a branch of tourism called sound tourism, for those who seek out places with unique sounds. There even is a website, Sound Tourism, to learn about interesting sounding places and acoustic.

If you want to enjoy the world’s sounds, you need to be able to hear them.

Protect your hearing.

Remember: if something sounds too loud, it IS too loud!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Preserving the rainforest’s soundtrack

Photo credit: David Riaño Cortés from Pexels

MIchael J. Coren, Quartz, writes about bioacoustics, a burgeoning field that uses “microphones to capture the aural signature of an ecosystem’s inhabitants from its tiniest creatures to its resident humans.” The goal of bioacoustics is to “monitor biodiversity, on a budget, over vast areas of remote rainforest.” Coren writes about a recent paper in the journal Science, where the authors suggest that bioacoustics “could fill a critical gap for conservation projects” by monitoring the forest’s health after it’s been saved.

Click the link to listen to the recordings that accompany the piece.  Two of them are soundscapes of healthy forests, while the third is clear-cut jungle now worked as a palm oil plantation.  The difference in the range and loudness of sound is apparent.