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Queens Community Board targets noisy car racing

Photo credit: mike noga from Pexels

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

The pandemic has brought about a changed soundscape; in some cases resulting in less noise impacting on residents and in other cases more noise. In Astoria, Queens, car stunts and car racing have become the new normal, according to Queens Community Board 52 member Lisa Rozner, and so has the overwhelming noise accompanying these stunts and races. To the delight of residents impacted by such noises, Rozner’s complaint led one parking lot’s owner to respond by putting up “no loitering” signs in the lot. The residents then reported “quiet for the first time in months.”

But other Queens neighborhoods are still being subjected to the loud noises of these raceway meetups. The racers have mapped out their paths along Queens streets and the residents are not only subjected to noise but to driving that in one case resulted in a vehicle slamming into a property. One resident said that these drivers are not fearful of being caught because police officers have not been attending to this problem. The NYPD in the community acknowledged awareness of the situation.

In response to community complaints, Councilman Jimmy van Bramer is working with the city’s Department of Transportation about changes to the roadways which could include installing “speed cushions” and encouraging slower speeds.

As I have written in an earlier blog, residents in Manhattan and Westchester have also been complaining about these loud, intrusive car races and that legislation to restrict this behavior has been introduced at the state level. Unfortunately, there has been no significant movement regarding this legislation. I can only urge city and state legislators to pay greater attention to this activity and recognize that noise is hazardous to mental and physical health and well-being.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Could wearing a mask protect your hearing?

Photo credit: Anna Shvets from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

COVID-19 (technically SARS-CoV-2) is a novel coronavirus first detected less than a year ago. Because it is new, no one has immunity to it, leading to a worldwide pandemic. And also because it is new, physicians, public health experts, virologists, and many others have much to learn about it.

Two recent articles add to this knowledge.

One, in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, reports that COVID-19 was isolated from mastoid bone and middle ear tissue. The other, in BMJ Case Reports, described a case of sudden irreversible hearing loss ascribed to COVID-19 infection.

It is well known that respiratory viruses can affect the middle and inner ear. Now we know this is also true for COVID-19.

Could wearing a mask to protect yourself and others from COVID-19 also protect your hearing?

Based on these two articles, I think the answer is, “Yes.”

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

One teen’s efforts to update the Americans With Disabilities Act

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I recently wrote about Bryan Pollard’s efforts to bring hyperacusis to the attention of the ENT research community, asking the question, “Can one person make a difference?” The answer clearly was, “Yes.”

Today I’m writing about another single-handed effort to bring about change, also about hyperacusis.

Hyperacusis is a condition that causes a person to be unable to tolerate everyday noise levels without discomfort or pain. And a teen named Jemma-Tiffany with this condition is trying to get another section, Title VI, added to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

As she writes, “[t]his addition to the ADA would Require that all services, facilities, activities either provide a person who has a condition who would otherwise be in pain, ill, or unable to participate due to the sensory and other environmental factors with either an accessible virtual option, modify the sensory or other environmental factors to meet their needs, or provide them with a separate specialized environment to meet their needs.*”*

She has met with one of her senators and will meet the other, and her congressional representative, soon.

Environmental modifications intended specifically to help those with disabilities really make life better for all. Two examples are the ADA lever-style door handle, which makes doors easier for everyone to open, and curb cuts and wheelchair ramps that make life easier for parents pushing a baby stroller, or delivery workers with a cart of packages, or repair technicians with heavy equipment on wheels.

And a more accessible or quieter world mandated by an ADA Title VI will be a better and more enjoyable place for all.

We hope Jemma-Tiffany is successful in her efforts.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Buildings are noisy because architects don’t study sound

Photo credit: Graeme Maclean licensed under CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Most of us assume when we walk into a very noisy building that it must be ok, because if it weren’t, wouldn’t somebody have thought of a solution to the problem? But it’s a simple fact that planners and architects spend little to no time thinking about noise and sound, unless they are designing a theater or performance space.

Architects don’t inhabit the spaces they design. And they can’t show clients pictures of what their projects will sound like, unless they spend some money on modeling sound conditions.

This fairly sparse article at least touches on this vast area of ignorance about sound among architects, planners, and grad school faculty.

The foundations of acoustical science are well over a century old and well respected, but they are embedded in physics, not art and architecture. Not every architect and planner is ignorant of the subject—there are some exceptions–but the plain fact is architects do not know how to design for good sound quality. They rely on specialists from physics, and those people cost money. As a result, noise is typically not recognized as a problem until after a building has been built and the planners, architects, designers, and contractors have all gone home and deposited their checks.  And then it is often too late.

So next time you’re in a nicely designed space that you find is too noisy, remember that it’s very likely no one thought about the soundscape until it was too late and hoped you wouldn’t notice. Be sure to tell them that you do.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

The future of work is not in noisy offices, NY Times survey says

Photo credit: Rum Bucolic Ape licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The future of work is not in cacophonous offices, a New York Times survey says. Pandemic-related working from home has accelerated a pivotal, even historic, change: people do not want to go back to their old noisy, politically-charged, distracting, disease-spreading offices. Many–60% according to the New York Times survey–say they’d rather continue to work from home as much as possible.

Could this be the next big driver of “knowledge-worker productivity,” i.e., no commuting, no irrelevant distractions, no pointless meetings in airless conference rooms
with management bringing in the boxes of donuts as a concession? If management buys into this change, hooray!

The whole open plan office fad has really been driven by two things: bean-counters trying to reduce the fixed costs of providing workspace for knowledge workers, while simultaneously satisfying the perceived need by managers enjoy seeing and “counting heads” of everyone under their control by simply looking across the open office floor. There’s been plenty of talk for decades about the advantages of “teaming,” “collaboration,” “sharing,” “cooperation,” and “camaraderie.”

But the bottom line has really been about…the bottom line. Open plan offices save money by spending less on both fixed assets (buildings) and peoples’ needs for space where they can really focus and concentrate, and giving them instead a “hotel-style” chair amidst many others at picnic-style tables and shared kitchens with fully stocked refrigerators so they never need to leave.

Things are changing! Now what will corporations do with all of that empty office space?

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Why can’t you hear?

Photo credit: Helena Lopes from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This piece in the Canadian edition of Psychology Today asks “Why can’t you hear?,” but a better title might be “Why can’t you understand speech in a noisy room?”

This problem is known in audiology circles as the “speech in noise” problem. People can understand what someone is saying just fine in a quiet room, but can’t follow a conversation in a noisy one. The problem has been known for decades, but now it is thought that the cause is cochlear synaptopathy, also called hidden hearing loss because hearing test results–technically known as pure tone audiometry–are normal despite the patient’s complaints of not being able to hear.

The problem can be assessed clinically by a number of tests, including the Hearing in Noise Test and the QuickSIN test. Now researchers at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary have developed two tests, one measuring pupillary responses and the other recording electrical signals from the ear drum.

The inability to understand speech in noise is a frustrating one. Hearing aids usually don’t help much, although newer digital hearing aids with special features claim to do better.

Much better than any hearing aid, though, is preserved natural hearing. Protect your ears. If something sounds too loud, it is too loud. Turn down the volume, use hearing protection, leave the area, or you might have speech n noise difficulty later.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.