Silencity

The Truth About Noise

Latest Posts

Noise is the next great public health crisis

Photo credit: Loozrboy licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coaltion

This wonderful article from Futurism.com discusses the major problem of noise pollution as the nation and the world become increasingly urbanized.

Few remember that the U.S., government policy, as voted by Congress and signed into law in 1972, is “to promote an environment for all Americans free from noise that jeopardizes their health and welfare.”

The article’s author, Neel V. Patel, cites extensively noise pioneer and The Quiet Coalition co-founder and board member Arline Bronzaft, PhD, who 45 years ago showed that environmental noise interfered with children’s learning.

As Patel writes:

It’s impossible to overstate how much noise pollution can wreak havoc on human health and safety. High noise levels can exacerbate hypertension, cause insomnia or sleep disturbances, result in hearing loss, and worsen a plethora of other medical conditions. All of these problems can aggravate other health issues by inducing higher levels of stress, which can cascade into worsened immune systems, heart problems, increased anxiety and depression — the list just goes on and on.

We at The Quiet Coalition agree.  So click the first link, read Patel’s article, and learn how the U.S. government’s active failure to regulate noise since 1981 all but guarantees that noise is the next great public health crisis.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

This new year resolve to avoid products that damage health (even when used as directed)!

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions. If something is worth doing, why wait to do it until January 1. But many people do, so here is one suggestion:

Avoid products that damage your health or the health of others when used exactly as directed.

What are these products? I can think of three: tobacco products, firearms, and earbuds or headphones using 85 decibels as a safe volume limit (without any exposure time recommended). 85 decibels isn’t a safe volume limit. It’s an occupational noise exposure standard that even with strict time limits doesn’t prevent hearing loss in all exposed workers.

If you believe in New Year’s resolutions, one of your’s should be this: I won’t use products that when used as directed damage my health or the health of others.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise sensitivity is all in your head–and this report proves it!

Photo credit: Allan Ajifo licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I developed tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and hyperacusis (a sensitivity to noise, characterized by discomfort and pain to noise levels that others don’t have a problem with) ten years ago after a one-time exposure to loud noise.

It was at a New Year’s Eve dinner in a restaurant. As midnight approached, they kept cranking the music up louder and louder. My wife could tell I was uncomfortable and suggested that we leave, but I didn’t want to offend her or the friends who had arranged the dinner.

We left as soon after midnight as we could, but my ears were ringing when we left and the ringing never stopped. And I found that sounds that didn’t bother others bothered me.

For years hyperacusis was thought to be purely psychosomatic and those with it to have some sort of psychiatric disorder. Then pain fibers were discovered in the auditory system. And now this report from Finland shows that there are differences in the brains of people with noise sensitivity.

So yes, hyperacusis is all in our heads. But it’s not as a psychiatric problem, it’s a central nervous system difference.

Science marches on!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Loud music is just as addictive as smoking

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from New Zealand states that loud music is just as addictive as smoking.

The only quibble I have with the report is that it states that hearing loss begins at an 85 decibel exposure and that 85 decibels is a safe volume limit for children. Neither statement is correct. Both I and the NIOSH Science Blog have written about how the 85 decibel standard is an occupational standard that should not be used a a safe noise exposure standard for the general public.

But the basic premise of the report–that noise exposure from personal music player use by children is causing hearing loss–is sound.

So break the habit, and lower the volume. Your ears will thank you.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Four in 10 UK adults unknowingly endanger their hearing on a daily basis

Photo credit: Gary J. Wood licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report states that 40% of adults in the United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales) unknowingly endanger their hearing on a daily basis.

This finding fits neatly with Dr. Gregory A. Flamme’s report that 70% of U.S. adults get total noise doses exceeding safe limits and Dr. Richard Neitzel’s similar finding in a Swedish population.

This isn’t rocket science–noise exposure for the ear is like sun exposure for the skin. If you don’t want deep wrinkles, age spots, and skin cancers when you get older, wear a hat, long sleeves, sunscreen, and avoid the sun.

If you don’t want hearing aids when you get older, avoid noise exposure.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.