Silencity

The Truth About Noise

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Noise-activated camera to nab noisy motorists? It might just work:

Taipei, Taiwan installs sound-activated cameras to target noisy motorists. The Taipei Times reports that the Taipei Department of Environmental Protection has “unveiled a noise-activated camera to photograph motorists who make excessive noise at night.”  The camera is activated when noise recordings reach 84 decibels or more between 10:30 p.m. and 3:30 a.m.  When that happens, the camera will send the image and decibel level to a laptop computer operated by inspectors who will be by the roadside.  So how much will you have to pay for the privilege of honking your horn at night?  Between NT $1,800 to $3,600 (roughly US $57 to $114), depending on the decibel level.

Sleep well, Taipei.

Link via @hyperacusisresearch.

Need a little help falling asleep? Help is on the way:

The Best White Noise Apps & Sites. Lisa Poisso, Techlicious, reviews websites and apps offering pink noise generators for better sleep as well as options to enhance concentration and focus when you are adrift in a sea of noise.

Link via @jeaninebotta.

If life is fair, the person responsible for the first open plan office

will spend eternity in his or her own special ring in hell. Whatever the initial motivation for the open floor plan–we recall it was to encourage “collaboration,” which must have been the word du jour at the time–many who followed this “innovation” only did so to reap cost savings. That open floor plans are and were unpopular with the worker bees was dismissed without serious consideration as finance departments and underperforming CEOs gleefully counted pennies (that would soon find their way to their bonus checks).

Sadly, this short-sighted and short-term attempt to shore up shaky financial reports is causing some very real problems.  As Amy X. Wang, Quartz, notes, “[s]tudies have found that lack of sound privacy is the biggest drain on employee morale, and that workers lose as much as 86 minutes a day to distractions.”  In fact, in the last year a flurry of articles have come out that acknowledge the very real costs of open plan offices.  So what will our corporate overlords do?  Will they call in the designers and reconfigure the office space?  Don’t hold your breath.  They will more likely send Wang’s article, “The complete guide to noise-canceling in open offices and other hectic spaces,” to the underlings and go back to surfing the web looking for their next unnecessary purchase.

As for Wang’s advice?  The usual: invest in a pair of noise-cancelling headphones, download white noise apps, get a plant, go for a walk.  Saved you a click.

Link via Quiet Revolution: @livequiet.

Nature is remarkable:

This is what a frozen lake sounds like.  , The Verge, writes about “one of the coolest sounds you can hear. A frozen lake that looks like it’s been stopped in time, but in fact keeps shifting and moaning sounding like a Star Wars blaster.”  Sadly, she didn’t have equipment to record the sound, but she found a good example online:

Amazing natural ice pressure sounds of the Gun Lake in British Columbia, recorded by @Mesmerizingsounds.

Enjoy!

 

Anemic? See your doctor and get your iron tablets, stat:

Iron Deficiency Anemia Tied to Hearing Loss.  Iron deficiency anemia should be relatively easy to manage. So see your doctor, get a blood test, and manage your anemia.

That said, Dr. Daniel Fink, a leading noise activist, cautions that the study appears to be a preliminary one. The study reviewed data from approximately 300,000 deidentified adult patient records at Milton K. Hershey Medical Center in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The diagnosis of hearing loss was made by mention of one or more diagnostic codes for hearing loss on at least one encounter. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia was made from laboratory tests. Then statistical analyses were performed. No audiometric tests were done, and the prevalence of hearing loss was much lower than that reported in other studies.  Dr. Fink thinks this report might help guide future research, but the fact remains that noise exposure, not iron deficiency anemia, is the major cause of hearing loss in the United States.

Looking for a free professional grade sound level meter app?

Photo credit: NIOSH blog

Look no further: Introducing the new NIOSH Sound Level Meter App. Yes, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has just released a free sound level meter app for IOS (Apple) devices. Recognizing that “most of the apps on the market are oriented at the casual user and lack the accuracy and functionality necessary to conduct occupational noise measurements, NIOSH hearing loss researchers collaborated with an app developer, EA LAB, to create an iOS based sound level meter app that measures and characterizes occupational noise exposure similar to professional instruments.”

NIOSH has developed this app so that “workers around the world [can] collect and share workplace (or task-based) noise exposure data using their smartphones.” And once the data has been collected, “[s]cientists and occupational safety and health professionals could rely on such shared data to build job exposure databases and promote better hearing health and prevention efforts.”

NIOSH is making the app available to anyone who would like to download it. Click here to learn more about the app and for the link to download it at the App Store. NIOSH is looking for any and all feedback about the app and asks that you help them spread the word about this new tool for protecting workers’ hearing.

We know the feeling:

In “Why I hate my fellow commuters in the quiet carriage.” Brian Yatman, The Sidney Morning Herald, writes about commuting by train and how the quiet car is abused by the rude and ignorant.  We’ve been there, although unlike Mr. Yatman we may have asked someone to keep it down once (or three times).  In any event, his suggestion for maintaining quiet car decorum is spot on:

What we need is some kind of official presence authorised to apply the shushing finger of the law. These marshals would glide about in comfy shoes, separating chatty couples, handing out Reader’s Digests, keeping the peace. They would issue warnings in the form of aphorisms. “Let us be silent, that we may hear the whispers of the gods,” they would intone, invoking the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Repeat offenders would be escorted off the train.

Or offenders could be thrown off, literally, to save time (and quickly escape the sound of their screams).  Do not violate the sanctity of the quiet car.

Link via @QuietMark.

As if air and water pollution weren’t enough:

Noise pollution from fracking may harm human health.  Brett Israel, UC Berkeley News, writes that “[f]racking creates noise at levels high enough to harm the health of people living nearby, according to the first peer-reviewed study to analyze the potential public health impacts of ambient noise related to fracking.”  What kind of health impacts?  The researchers found that “noise from fracking operations may contribute to adverse health outcomes in three categories, including anxiety, sleep disturbance and cardiovascular disease or other conditions that are negatively impacted by stress.”  One more reason to end fracking.  Click the link for a detailed description of the “complex symphony of noise types” associated with fracking activity.

We can’t tell if this is an elaborate joke (or not):

Photo credit: TaxRebate.org.uk

Hushme’s voice-masking headset could save your sanity! Or not.

The 2017 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas just wrapped up and, as usual, there were a handful of “interesting” gadgets that we may or may not ever see online, much less at a retail store.  Hushme must be on that short list.  Essentially, Hushme is a mask you place over your mouth (while wearing Bluetooth earbuds) that allows you to take a phone call without other people hearing you.  And to add an element of fun to this “interesting” product, the manufacturers allow you to play a series of sounds through external speakers to further obscure things (while killing the idea that Hushme will allow you to make a call without distracting those around you, but whatever).  How is playing sound through external speakers fun?  When it’s “sounds of some R2-D2-style beeping” or “[h]eavy, Darth Vader-ish breathing.”  Fun!

Click this link to view the Hushme promotional video and see if you agree with the description of the Hushme as “stylish.”  And be sure to keep your eye out for Hushme’s crowdfunding effort scheduled for sometime this year.  $200.  That’s what they expect to ask for each and every Hushme.