Silencity

The Truth About Noise

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Noise is a public health hazard and a hazard to your most important capital asset:

Nine sources of noise that will damage your house’s value.  Emmie Martin, Business Insider, writes about a recent study by Realtor.com that “calculated the price difference between homes within a certain radius of nine major noise factors — including airports, highways, and emergency rooms — and the median price of homes in the rest of that ZIP code.”  Click the link to see how noise effects house prices.  There isn’t much prose, but the slider makes it clear that noise matters when you are buying or selling your home.

 

This is fascinating:

Plants Have an “Ear” for Music. Matthew Sedacca, Nautilus, writes about Dan Carlson, Sr., who, after his experience in the Korean demilitarized zone in the 1960s, dedicated himself to “increase plant growth and help reduce, or even eliminate, world hunger.”  Carlson studied at the University of Minnesota, trying to learn everything he could about how plants grow.  What he discovered was interesting:

Years later, Carlson believed he found part of his answer. He maintained that “green music”—sounds akin to, or recorded from, those found in nature, like birds singing or crickets stridulating—possesses frequencies that boost plant growth and yield rates. He claimed that when exposed to synthesized birdsong, a plant’s stomata—the mouth-like pores on the underside of leaves that absorb water and nutrients and expel oxygen—widen. Before he died in 2012, he listed growing a Purple Passion (Gynura aurantiaca)—a houseplant that usually grows up to a foot—1,300 feet high to the sound of green music as one of his lifetime achievements. It earned him a Guinness World Record.

Yes, it sounds kind of nutty, and some people in the past relied on pseudoscience, but today “plant bioacoustics is a growing field of interest in science.”  In fact, in “a recent study published in Scientific Reports, a team of researchers from Yeungnam University in Gyeongsan, South Korea, found, just as Carlson did over 30 years ago, that “green music” can cause plants to undergo biological transformations.”

Click the first link to read the entire article.  It’s well worth your time.

This was reported as if it were a good thing:

Kentucky’s Rupp Arena breaks Guinness World Record for indoor crowd noise. According to the Kentucky Athletics’ twitter account, Kentucky’s Rupp Arena gets to claim the Guiness Book of World Records title for “the loudest indoor crowd roar ever!”  Yay, noise!  And just how loud was the roar?  It was 126.4 decibels.  How loud is that?  Well, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations provide that the permissible exposure limit for 126 decibels (A-weighted) is 0.054 hours or 3.25 minutes, so we are going with “really really loud.”  The article doesn’t say how long the roar was maintained, but even if it bested 3.25 minutes only the team staff and arena employees are protected under OSHA regulations.  Sorry fans and team athletes.

At least “[c]omplimentary earplugs were placed in most seats for fans who didn’t want to brave the noise.”  The article doesn’t explain why complimentary earplugs weren’t offered to all fans, nor does it ask why the Guinness Book of World Records is encouraging such irresponsible behavior.

One day, when people find out that most hearing loss is due to noise and that noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable, they are going to be very justifiably angry.  Until that happens, folks who follow the stock market may want to check out hearing aid companies.

If you are in DC this week and want to find a quiet space,

Photo credit: Studio Simon Heijdens

head over to the Royal Netherlands Embassy and you’ll find the “Silent Room.” The Silent Room is an art installation by Simon Heijdens that he originally designed for the 2016 SXSW Festival. Heijdens said that during the festival there is too much noise and smells and people and sight, so he wanted to create a “black hole,” “somewhere where people could people can go inside, almost like a cold shower of silence.”  From the outside, his piece looks like an ordinary black shipping container, but inside “it’s a different world, devoid of sound and color.”  And he means completely.  Heijdens worked with a team of acoustic engineers to make “the padded, anechoic chamber that absorbs noise from the outside world. The result is complete, dead silence.”

“Silent Room” is open from noon to 2:00 p.m. through February 1st.  Click the link if you are interested in seeing it as you must RSVP for an invite.

 

If this works, could it lead to lower siren volumes?

Stockholm ambulances to trial blocking drivers’ music so sirens can be heard. The Telegraph reports that a new alert system is being trialed in Stockholm, Sweden that “overrides loud music and bypasses sound-proofed car insulation so drivers will never be caught off guard by an approaching emergency vehicle.”  The new system “uses the FM radio signal to jam drivers’ speakers and send a voice alert that an ambulance is approaching.”  The reason for the new system was the realization that drivers often had only seconds to react to a siren when the a better warning time is at least 10 to 15 seconds. The alert will only work on cars that have the radio on, but it’s estimated that it will reach two-thirds of the cars on the road.

If this system works, one would hope that emergency vehicle sirens could be adjusted so that pedestrians and other people nearby could be spared ear-splitting siren volumes in the attempt to alert distracted motorists. It doesn’t hurt to dream.

Link via Quiet Edinburgh.

What’s missing from this story about stadium noise in Atlanta?

Aaron Rodgers: It’s loud in Atlanta, whether it’s all natural or not.  How about a discussion about the dangers of stadium noise?  It’s nowhere to be found. Instead, this NBC post focuses on noise as a tactic and the stupidity of getting caught juicing natural crowd noise with fake crowd noise over the stadium speakers. To wit:

The Falcons were stripped of a fifth-round pick in the 2016 NFL draft and fined $350,000 after an investigation revealed that they had been using fake crowd noise while the opposing offense was on the field during the 2013 and 2014 seasons.

And? Were the Falcons penalized for injuring the hearing of every person in the stadium, or were they fined for violating whatever passes for sportsmanship in football?

This chest thumping over which stadium can produce the most noise–as if that’s a measure of anything good–would be merely pathetic if it weren’t so dangerous.

Need something to distract you from a noisy co-worker?

This ASMR of vegetables defrosting may make you shudder with delight.  Ok.  So, what exactly is an ASMR?  According to knowyourmeme.com, an ASMR, or Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, is:

[A] term used to describe a sensory experience characterized by a pleasant tingling sensation in the head and scalp, which can be triggered by sounds like whispering or brushing, and visual stimulus like painting or drawing. On YouTube, the phenomenon inspired the creation of “whisperer” videos, in which people attempt to trigger the viewer’s ASMR by speaking in a soft voice and making various sounds with inanimate objects.

Personally, we thought the ASMR would make an excellent white noise loop.  Enjoy!

Not surprised at all:

Noise tops list of complaints to NYC’s 311 last year. Noise complaints made up 9.3% of all complaints to 311, New York City’s official complaint line, according to Trulia, a real estate listings firm.  So, just how many complaints was that exactly?  212,318.

There’s a reason why New York City is known as the city that never sleeps.

Yet another mystery noise. This time up north:

Canadian army investigates mysterious Arctic noise. Phys.org reports that the Canadian Army has been dispatched to investigate a strange beeping noise heard several times by Inuit hunters off the Fury and Hecla Straight. One theory was that the sound was made by marine mammals, because the strait is “usually frequented by narwhals, bowhead whales, ringed seals and bearded seals.” But the Inuit said that there were no animals left, as they all disappeared last year.  What is known is that the noise is loud and “it comes from the bottom of the sea.”  Although an initial investigation found no anomalies and the case was closed, the Canadian military decided to address Inuit concerns by sending two acoustic specialists to join a previously scheduled Canadian Rangers patrol to investigate further. And so the mystery noise remains a mystery, for now.

 

Noise-activated camera to nab noisy motorists? It might just work:

Taipei, Taiwan installs sound-activated cameras to target noisy motorists. The Taipei Times reports that the Taipei Department of Environmental Protection has “unveiled a noise-activated camera to photograph motorists who make excessive noise at night.”  The camera is activated when noise recordings reach 84 decibels or more between 10:30 p.m. and 3:30 a.m.  When that happens, the camera will send the image and decibel level to a laptop computer operated by inspectors who will be by the roadside.  So how much will you have to pay for the privilege of honking your horn at night?  Between NT $1,800 to $3,600 (roughly US $57 to $114), depending on the decibel level.

Sleep well, Taipei.

Link via @hyperacusisresearch.