Tag Archive: Action on Hearing Loss

Noisy restaurants irk Brits

Photo credit: Garry Knight licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Trying to make restaurants quieter was my first noise activist effort almost three years ago. When I started, I was a lonely voice but now–whether because more people are aware of noise as a problem, or because restaurants are getting noisier–the ubiquitous problem of restaurant noise is receiving almost weekly media attention here in the U.S. and abroad. In fact, two British dailies recently wrote about restaurant noise in the same 24-hour period, spurred on by a campaign against noise by the British nonprofit Action on Hearing Loss. [Note: You must register to read either story, but registration is free.]

No one likes regulations, but when there are almost no quiet restaurants around, advising people to avoid noisy restaurants and dine only at quiet ones isn’t a realistic option.

But if enough people complain to enough elected officials, perhaps indoor quiet laws will be passed.

Sound impossible?  Well that’s how restaurants, and then bars and workplaces, became smoke free. One city introduced a law banning smoking in restaurants, and when others saw that the sky didn’t fall, they adopted these laws, too.

I’m confident that when the public realizes that deafening noise levels in restaurants are as bad for their hearing (and probably their balance as well) as secondhand smoke is for their heart and lungs, they will demand quieter restaurants.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

UK charity takes on restaurant noise

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Photo credit: Quiet City Maps

Action on Hearing Loss launched Speak Easy, its campaign that asked restaurants, cafes, and pubs “to take noise off the menu,” this past summer.  Last week, the organization announced that its free Speak Easy Campaign Pack is available to the public.  The pack includes:

  • Discreet, supportive materials to hand over to staff or leave with your bill.
  • Ideas for sending effective feedback.
  • A thumb prop for expressing your views on social media.

Action on Hearing Loss understands that “[r]epeat customers are the lifeblood of restaurants, cafes and pubs,” and that millions of people would like to enjoy a meal or drink out at a quieter venue.  Rather than waiting for places to discover this underserved market, they are giving Brits the tools they need to demand quieter options.

Although there isn’t a similar campaign in the U.S.–yet–readers who live or work in New York City can find quieter venues by visiting our sister site, Quiet City Maps, which reviews and rates the noise level and comfortability of New York City restaurants, bars, coffee shops, and more.  Whether you’re at your desk planning a night out with friends, or on your smart phone looking for a nearby quiet place, Quiet City Maps can help you quickly find the perfect place to eat, drink, and have a conversation!

Dear restaurant owners: we don’t go to your restaurants to listen to music!

Brits complain that minimalist decor and loud music are driving them away from restaurants.  Action on Hearing Loss, a British charity, has conducted a survey in which they found that “90 per cent of people with hearing difficulties felt background noise was the biggest problem they faced when eating out.”  The survey also found that “79 per cent of [respondents] said they had left an establishment early because of the sound levels and 91 per cent of those asked said they wouldn’t go back to a noisy venue.” 

Not mentioned in the article is the theory that restauranteurs deliberately play loud music in an attempt to scare away older customers, since these restauranteurs must all covet a younger crowd that presumably loves stereocilia-destroying music.  If true, they will no doubt ignore the advice offered in the articl to temper the loud volume, but they should not ignore the warning noted in the piece.  Namely, Action on Hearing Loss “is now hoping to develop an app which will allow people to take a decibel recording for restaurants, posting it onto a forum and allowing people to avoid particularly noisy establishments.” 

New Yorkers already have a tool they can use to help them avoid mind-numbingly loud restaurants.  Our sister site, Quiet City Maps, reviews noise levels of restaurants, bars, coffee shops, parks and privately owned public spaces throughout the city.  Click on the link to read the reviews and to check out the map, which shows you the good, the bad, and the ugly with easy to understand color icons.  A mobile app is in the works, so please send any suggestions of (relatively) quiet places their way.

 

UK charity, Action on Hearing Loss, is taking on extraneous and unnecessary noise:

How to Combat the Background Noise in Restaurants.

The article discusses Action on Hearing Loss’s “Speak Easy” campaign which takes aim at high noise levels in restaurant chains.  The charity conducted a survey of nearly 1,500 people across the UK and found that “eight out of ten people have left a restaurant, cafe or pub early due to noise levels” and that 91% said that they “would not return to a venue they considered to be too noisy.”  Armed with the statistics, the charity “produced a practical guide to help the catering industry improve customer experience levels with noise reduction measures.”  This is a brilliant approach to an often ignored problem.  Kudos to Action on Hearing Loss.