Tag Archive: air pollution

Why do people hate leaf blowers?

 

Leaf blower overkill  |  Photo credit: Hector Alejandro licensed under CC BY 2.0

Because everything about them is so awful!

Well, that’s just our opinion. , howstuffworks.com, gives a more detailed answer. Dove starts by noting that “unlike lawn mowers, leaf blowers are probably the most villainized devices in the lawn care universe,” because they are now used year-round and for many–most?–the noise level they create is unacceptable. As a result, when leaf blowers first became common in the U.S., Dove says two California communities, Carmel-by-the-Sea and Beverly Hills, banned leaf blowers back in the 1970s.  And they have been followed since then by hundreds of communities nationwide that have banned or limited their use.

Why are leaf blowers so hateful? Dove asks and answers:

What is it about leaf blowers that people hate? Is it the decibels? The constancy? Do leaf blowers pose real dangers to the health of users or others who happen to be within earshot? Increasingly, the answer appears to be “yes” —to all of the above.

In the end, leaf blowers create a whirlwind of dust that includes, among other things, dried animal feces, molds, and fungi. Gasoline-powered leaf blowers emit a litany of horribles, including benzene, a known carcinogen. And then there is the noise, which is not merely a nuisance but also a serious health threat.

As for those who would ask how we could possibly deal with fallen leaves without leaf blowers, may we suggest the following:

Photo credit: Carol VanHook licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

Rakes are a healthier, cheaper, and quieter alternative to the loud, filthy, and dangerous leaf blowers we’ve put up with for entirely too long.

 

Here’s some frightening noise news:

Dementia rates “higher near busy roads.”, “[t]he researchers adjusted the data to account for other risk factors like poverty, obesity, education levels and smoking so these are unlikely to explain the link.”

Said Dr. Hong Chen, from Public Health Ontario and one of the paper’s authors, “increasing population growth and urbanisation have placed many people close to heavy traffic, and with widespread exposure to traffic and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from near-road exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

Still, the study only suggests that there is a link. As Dr. Chen concludes, “[m]ore research to understand this link is needed, particularly into the effects of different aspects of traffic, such as air pollutants and noise.”

 

 

First mobile app for street-level air and noise pollution launches in Europe,

coming to the United States soon.  According to its developers, the Ambiciti mobile app “measures levels of air and noise pollution street by street in real-time and offers the healthiest route for urban citizens to move and live in their cities.”  The app does this by combining “all sources of information available: numerical simulations, observations of fixed sensors, mobile sensor observations and qualitative observation,” so that people can choose a path around the city that minimizes their exposure to noise or air pollution.  The developers hope that the information the app provides influences policy decisions and encourages healthier lives.