Tag Archive: alarms

In a followup to his post on looking for a quiet car,

Dr. Daniel Fink, Chair of The Quiet Coalition, has written a post about disturbing noises automobile manufacturers purposefully add to their cars: There’s More To Car Noise Than Interior Sound. Dr. Fink’s second post was prompted by a reader who noted that while “[d]esign of the quietest interior possible has become highly competitive,” little thought is given to “the effect that automotive lock, locating, and security technology have on the residential soundscape.”  Simply put, automobile manufacturers have adopted sound as a default to confirm a car door is locked or to locate a car in a parking lot without thinking about the effect of adding all of these audible honks and beeps and warnings to an already noisy soundscape.

Fortunately, there are some steps car owners can take to disable or modify the audible alerts, but not without difficultly.  Click the link above to get Dr. Fink’s list of questions to ask about audible alerts before buying a car.

Is It Safe to Turn Down the Volume of Hospital Alarms?

New Study Chimes In: “Yes.” If you have ever spent any time in a hospital, whether as a visitor or especially as a patient, you probably wondered how the patients sleep with the constant din caused by monitors, particularly the alarms. The answer, apparently, is “they can’t.” While some sort of alarm is needed to alert staff when a patient is having a crisis, Anesthesiology News reports that “[t]he overabundance and high volume of hospital alarms can have deleterious effects on patients and providers, impairing clinician performance and possibly compromising patient safety (citation omitted).” The good news? The study’s author found that “clinician performance is maintained with alarms that are softer than background noise.”

Coming soon to a hospital near you: A good night’s rest!

 

How are patients expected to recover when hospitals are so loud?

Intensive care’s intensive noise problem.  Click the link for an interesting read about the effect of noise in intensive care units on both patients and staff.  Short form: Patients can’t sleep, staff have increased stress levels.

Link via Quiet Mark, a UK national charitable foundation that focuses on abating excessive and unnecessary noise by creating demand and providing incentive for quieter technology in homes, workplaces, and public spaces.