Tag Archive: annoyance

If living over an airport flight path is hell, imagine what it’s like living near a mililtary base:

Residents fed up with fighter jet noise. Madison, Wisconsin residents gird themselves as the U.S. Air Force looks for two bases to house F-35 Lightning IIs, with Truax Field in Madison on the finalist short list. The residents are concerned because they are already exposed to jet noise from F-16s.  One resident stated that the “windows of her home on Madison’s north side rattle when military jets from Truax fly over.”  Another described the F-16 noise as “ear-shattering.”

Naturally, there are forces who want the F-35 to come to Madison, claiming that the move “could create hundreds of jobs” (emphasis added).  Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce president Zach Brandon asserts that “the economic benefits and the need for communities to contribute to national defense efforts outweigh the annoyance of noise” (emphasis added).  Apparently Zach Brandon does not live over the flight path nor is aware of the health implications of noise exposure.  Or maybe he’s just distracted by visions of dollar bills.  Good luck, Madison residents.

And the world just got a little bit quieter:

Rejoice! Apple removes irritating startup chime from MacBook Pros.

We can’t help but think that the removal of any noise–even something as seemingly innocuous as the startup chime on a MacBook Pro–is a good thing.  That manufacturers insist on using sound to indicate that some act or thing was achieved really needs to end.  One hopes Apple’s move will herald similar action by other computer manufacturers until eventually one common layer of sound comes to an end.

Link via @jeaninebotta.

The war against leaf blowers inches forward:

As another California city mulls ban on blowers of all types.  No doubt some people may wonder why others dedicate time and energy fighting something that seems fairly innocuous, at best, and merely annoying, at worst.  But leaf blowers are not just an annoyance.  Quiet Communities, a nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting our health, environment, and quality of life from the excessive use of industrial outdoor maintenance equipment, has documented the substantial health hazard leaf blowers pose to the health of the operator, those in the vicinity of the activity, and even our pets, too.

So hearing that Ojai, California is considering banning all blowers, both gas-powered and battery-powered, is encouraging.  And yes, there will be push back, but in the end the only reason not to ban leaf blowers is that the alternatives are more expensive.  A fact that is only true if you only consider the additional labor cost and ignore the savings to health and wellbeing.

The costs of hearing loss:

The New York TIme’s Jane Brody writes about the high cost of hearing loss in Hearing Loss Costs Far More Than Ability to Hear.

Brody’s post focuses on a psychologist, Mark Hammel, who addressed his hearing loss by (finally) getting hearing aids.  Dr. Hammel provides insights into how hearing loss inflicts real and profound costs on sufferers, many of whom become socially isolated as a result of their condition.  But the post highlights the other costs as well, noting that “30 to 48 million Americans have hearing loss that significantly diminishes the quality of their lives — academically, professionally and medically as well as socially.”  Brody adds that hearing loss can affect physical health (e.g., increased risk of dementia, stress, fatigue), as well as create safety and financial risks.  And those around the hearing impaired suffer as well, as “[m]any who are hard of hearing don’t realize how distressing it is to family members, who typically report feeling frustrated, annoyed and sad as a consequence of communication difficulties and misunderstandings.”

Loud noise causes hearing loss, a preventable medical problem that will continue until and unless people understand the consequences of ignoring it.  The first step to implementing protections against excessive noise is getting poeple to recognize the real and significant costs to the sufferer, his or her family and friends, and society as a whole.  Kudos to Brody for her thoughtful post.

Thanks to Daniel Fink, M.D., a noise pollution activist in the Los Angeles area, for the link.  Dr. Fink serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association.

10/07/2015 Update: Brody follows through with a companion piece that discusses the literal cost of hearing loss in The Hurdles to Getting Hearing Aids.  Among other things, Brody notes that while a failure to recognize hearing loss is one reason why people do not get hearing aids when needed, “the more important reason people fail to get hearing aids when they are needed is the cost, which is rarely covered by insurance and not at all by Medicare, unless the device is for a child.”  Given that the cost for one hearing aid (and most people need two) range from about $1,200 to $2,800,  it’s clear that the high cost of hearing aids keeps them out of the hands of the people who made need them the most.