Tag Archive: CDC

The CDC says “Protect your hearing”

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises everyone to protect his or hearing during July, which is Fireworks Safety Month:

Of course, we agree.

We only have two ears, and unlike our knees, they can’t be replaced.

I’ll go one step further and recommend that fireworks on July 4th be left to professionals and not used at home. Every year, people lose fingers or eyes because they or someone who loves them sets off fireworks at home, with disastrous consequences.

Please stay safe this fireworks season and protect your ears, too.

Thanks to the CDC for helping educate Americans about how to protect our auditory health.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As I have written previously, I’m not a big believer in special days or months. As far as I’m concerned, every day is World Hearing Day, every month is Better Hearing and Speech Month, and, of course, this month every day is Mother’s Day!

But I have also acknowledged that it helps to have a special day or month to celebrate something or someone and to remind us of important events or topics.

Thanks to our friends at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for all the helpful information they have prepared on protecting our hearing, which they are sharing with the public every month.

Please stay safe, both from COVID and from noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

CDC to run noise PSAs in Times Square

Photo credit: Jose Francisco Fernandez Saura at Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is “making noise about noise,” posting public service announcements on the world’s largest digital billboard at the proverbial “Crossroads of the World,” Times Square in New York City. The 15-second PSAs are scheduled for Thanksgiving week and the week before New Year’s Day.

The CDC’s public health message about the need for people to protect their hearing is very direct.

We hope everyone pays attention.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

A comic book about noise? Yes!

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Our contacts at the National Center for Environmental Health have let us know that their new educational comic book, “How Loud Is Too Loud?,” is now available online.

We are assisting in the dissemination of this valuable information, so that teachers, parents, grandparents, and friends of children of comic book reading age can help children learn about the dangers of noise.

Thanks to the folks at CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health for everything they are doing to help educate the public about the dangers of noise for hearing.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Will kids face an epidemic of hearing loss?

Photo credit: Jonas Mohamadi from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This interview of U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams and FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb discusses an unprecedented epidemic of vaping among teens. According to the FDA Commissioner and the Surgeon General, the epidemic caught public health authorities by surprise.

Use of personal music players, with associated headphones or earbuds, is also very common among teens. About 90% of teens have a personal music player of one sort or another. An article last year reported found auditory damage among 14% of Dutch schoolchildren age 9-11 who used personal music players. One might call this an epidemic of personal music player use.

It takes about 40 years of noise exposure for noise-induced hearing loss to become clinically apparent, so when today’s young people are in their 40s to 50s, they will likely be as hard of hearing as today’s people in their 60s, 70s, and 80s.

Since 2015, I have been trying to get those federal agencies responsible for protecting the public–the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Federal Trade Commission’s Division of Advertising Practices, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission–to take action to protect young people’s hearing. I’ve also communicated with the American Academy of Pediatrics, which educates parents about the dangers of sun exposure and tobacco smoke, but not about noise.

I’m going to add the Surgeon General to my list. A predecessor issued a Call to Action about skin cancer, but no one has said anything about noise in more than 50 years.

So far my appeals have largely been ignored.

So the question is this: Will there be an unprecedented epidemic of hearing loss in children and teens when they get older? And will those charged with protecting Americans’ health remember that they were warned?

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

CDC educates public about the dangers of noise

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Our contacts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have informed The Quiet Coalition that the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health will be educating the public about the dangers of noise exposure at sports events, via advertisements in official printed programs for NHL, NBA, and NFL games, including this year’s Super Bowl LIII. An example of the advertisement appears at the top of this post. One of the ads suggests that these efforts will even extend to NASCAR races.

Research done by the CDC showed that about 25% of American adults age 20-69 had noise-induced hearing loss, and that 53% of these people with NIHL had no major occupational exposure to loud noise. The hearing damage was occurring outside the workplace.

We applaud the CDC’s educational effort, but suspect that, as with creating the largely smoke-free environment we now enjoy, much more must be done. Namely, real change won’t happen until government regulations are promulgated that set standards for noise levels in different settings and require the use, or at least the offer, of hearing protection devices to attendees. Nothing less will protect the nation’s auditory health.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Americans aren’t protecting their hearing

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This newly published article from the CDC reports that 1) noise-induced hearing loss from non-occupational noise exposure is common in American adults, 2) recreational activities including sports and musical events are loud enough to damage hearing, and 3) very few American adults use earplugs or earmuffs–“hearing protective devices” in public or occupational health lingo–to protect their hearing.

This is a shame. Hearing loss is largely caused by noise exposure, and noise-induced hearing loss is entirely preventable.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud. Either turn down the volume, leave the noisy venue, wear earplugs or earmuff hearing protective devices, or wear hearing aids later.

The choice is yours.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The CDC is trying to prevent heart attacks. When will it try to prevent hearing loss?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control has embarked on a public education campaign to reduce preventable cardiovascular mortality. They are calling it Million Hearts. Among the things people can do to prevent heart disease and fatal heart attacks are what CDC is calling “the ABCs”: a daily baby aspirin (unless there are medical reasons not to take it), blood pressure control, cholesterol control, and not smoking. Other actions include exercising, maintaining an ideal body weight, and eating a healthy diet.

Thanks to the Framingham Study, we know that heart disease and stroke are not part of normal aging but are largely preventable. Similarly, hearing loss is not part of normal aging but largely represents noise-induced hearing loss.

So when will CDC embark on a similar campaign to educate the public about preventing hearing loss? I suggest calling it the Million Ears campaign. Maybe Ten Million Ears.

A common saying is “nobody dies from going deaf,”* but that isn’t true. Hearing loss is associated with social isolation, falls, depression, and dementia in older people, all of which in turn are correlated and most likely causally related to increased mortality. Hearing loss also has major impacts on enjoyment of life and social function.

And unlike preventing heart disease and stroke, preventing noise-induced hearing loss is much easier–just avoid loud noise and wear hearing protection if you can’t.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

* The phrase “nobody dies from going deaf” is what is commonly said. The word “deaf,” however, usually denotes congenital hearing loss or severe hearing loss. The term “hearing loss” is more appropriately used for mild to moderate noise-induced hearing loss.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Big decreases in smoking and soda consumption, is noise next?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just reported that the smoking rate in the U.S. is the lowest ever reported since this information started being collected. Only 13.9% of American adults are smoking. Unfortunately, this still means that there are 30 million smokers in the U.S., but this is great progress since the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health was issued in 1964.

Recent reports also indicate that efforts to educate the public about the dangers of soda consumption, combined in some cities with taxes on sugary beverages like soda, have also led to reductions in soda consumption.

Will noise be next? In 2016, the CDC recognized that noise exposure was a hazard for the public, not just for workers exposed to noise. There still is no federal recommendation, guideline, or standard for noise exposure for the public, unlike National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommendations, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, for noise exposure for workers.

But at least CDC is looking at the issue, after research showed that noise-induced hearing loss is occurring in people without occupational noise exposure, and we hope some specific guidance about noise will be issued soon. And we hope that this advice–as with smoking and soda consumption–will lead to decreased noise exposure, and decreased hearing loss, in the not too distant future.

In the meantime, remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

CDC issues warning about power tool noise

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has just published a fact sheet about the dangers of power tool noise for hearing.

I grew up helping my father maintain the small apartment house in which we lived, and still do a lot of home maintenance indoors and out.

After I became a noise activist in 2014 and learned how dangerous noise is for our ears, I have become much more protective about my hearing. If I use almost any tool louder than a screwdriver or a rake, I use hearing protection. Even when I hammer in one nail, and certainly if it’s any tool that has a motor.

And so should you.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.