Tag Archive: CDC

Americans aren’t protecting their hearing

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This newly published article from the CDC reports that 1) noise-induced hearing loss from non-occupational noise exposure is common in American adults, 2) recreational activities including sports and musical events are loud enough to damage hearing, and 3) very few American adults use earplugs or earmuffs–“hearing protective devices” in public or occupational health lingo–to protect their hearing.

This is a shame. Hearing loss is largely caused by noise exposure, and noise-induced hearing loss is entirely preventable.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud. Either turn down the volume, leave the noisy venue, wear earplugs or earmuff hearing protective devices, or wear hearing aids later.

The choice is yours.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The CDC is trying to prevent heart attacks. When will it try to prevent hearing loss?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control has embarked on a public education campaign to reduce preventable cardiovascular mortality. They are calling it Million Hearts. Among the things people can do to prevent heart disease and fatal heart attacks are what CDC is calling “the ABCs”: a daily baby aspirin (unless there are medical reasons not to take it), blood pressure control, cholesterol control, and not smoking. Other actions include exercising, maintaining an ideal body weight, and eating a healthy diet.

Thanks to the Framingham Study, we know that heart disease and stroke are not part of normal aging but are largely preventable. Similarly, hearing loss is not part of normal aging but largely represents noise-induced hearing loss.

So when will CDC embark on a similar campaign to educate the public about preventing hearing loss? I suggest calling it the Million Ears campaign. Maybe Ten Million Ears.

A common saying is “nobody dies from going deaf,”* but that isn’t true. Hearing loss is associated with social isolation, falls, depression, and dementia in older people, all of which in turn are correlated and most likely causally related to increased mortality. Hearing loss also has major impacts on enjoyment of life and social function.

And unlike preventing heart disease and stroke, preventing noise-induced hearing loss is much easier–just avoid loud noise and wear hearing protection if you can’t.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

* The phrase “nobody dies from going deaf” is what is commonly said. The word “deaf,” however, usually denotes congenital hearing loss or severe hearing loss. The term “hearing loss” is more appropriately used for mild to moderate noise-induced hearing loss.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Big decreases in smoking and soda consumption, is noise next?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just reported that the smoking rate in the U.S. is the lowest ever reported since this information started being collected. Only 13.9% of American adults are smoking. Unfortunately, this still means that there are 30 million smokers in the U.S., but this is great progress since the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health was issued in 1964.

Recent reports also indicate that efforts to educate the public about the dangers of soda consumption, combined in some cities with taxes on sugary beverages like soda, have also led to reductions in soda consumption.

Will noise be next? In 2016, the CDC recognized that noise exposure was a hazard for the public, not just for workers exposed to noise. There still is no federal recommendation, guideline, or standard for noise exposure for the public, unlike National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommendations, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, for noise exposure for workers.

But at least CDC is looking at the issue, after research showed that noise-induced hearing loss is occurring in people without occupational noise exposure, and we hope some specific guidance about noise will be issued soon. And we hope that this advice–as with smoking and soda consumption–will lead to decreased noise exposure, and decreased hearing loss, in the not too distant future.

In the meantime, remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

CDC issues warning about power tool noise

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has just published a fact sheet about the dangers of power tool noise for hearing.

I grew up helping my father maintain the small apartment house in which we lived, and still do a lot of home maintenance indoors and out.

After I became a noise activist in 2014 and learned how dangerous noise is for our ears, I have become much more protective about my hearing. If I use almost any tool louder than a screwdriver or a rake, I use hearing protection. Even when I hammer in one nail, and certainly if it’s any tool that has a motor.

And so should you.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

CDC promotes hearing health

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The U.S. Centers for DIsease Control and Promotion has recognized that hearing loss is a major problem in the U.S. and worldwide. Last June 2017 summer, it organized a CDC Grand Rounds on this topic.  The following new CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports summarizes that June meeting CDC Grand Rounds: Promoting Hearing Health Across the Lifespan. Here’s a link to the video of the Grand Rounds presentations.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

The importance of the scientific method

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The New York Times reports that officials at the Centers for Disease control were told not to use certain words, including “evidence based” and “science based.

The Quiet Coalition’s website states:

The Quiet Coalition consists of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.
We believe an evidence-based approach to noise as a health and social problem, combined with educational outreach and organized action, can lead to meaningful change.
The Quiet Coalition provides a platform for communication, programs, and coordinated action for those trying to bring current medical and scientific knowledge to the process of creating a quieter, more sustainable, and livable world.

The founders and members of The Quiet Coalition believe in scientific evidence and evidence-based policy and decision making.

We urge those in government to make decisions based on sound evidence, not on faith or dogma, and to monitor programs for results.

If something doesn’t work, stop that and try something different.

That’s the scientific method. That’s how Thomas Edison invented so many things. That’s how societies get ahead.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

The unintended consequences of CDC’s guidelines for preventing hearing impairment

by John Drinkwater, Founding Member, The Quiet Coalition

If you follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations to protect your hearing then be prepared for isolation and depression. The CDC’s February 2017 issue of Vital Signs states that continued exposure to unsafe sound levels can cause stress, anxiety, depression, isolation, and other health issues. So in order to protect your hearing, the CDC recommends everyone:

  1. Avoid noisy places.
  2. Use earplugs, earmuffs and noise canceling devices when in noisy places.

Amplified sound levels at restaurants, retail stores, movie theaters, health clubs, nightclubs, and other public places often are unsafe.

Following recommendation No. 1: You don’t go.

Following recommendation No. 2: Your ears can’t function properly.

Imagine if the “solution” to second hand smoke at a restaurant was to wear a protective mask over your nose and mouth. How could you possibly communicate and enjoy your meal? Hearing “protection” simulates the effects of hearing loss and inhibits your ability to communicate and enjoy the event. It also trains your ears to get used to the effects of hearing loss and may inhibit recognizing gradual hearing impairment.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), a part of the CDC charged with conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related injury and illness, is highly critical of earplugs and earmuffs and recommends they should only be used when engineering controls are not feasible to reduce noise levels. According to NIOSH, the noise reduction rating system (NRR) used for earmuffs and earplugs greatly overstates “protection” and therefore is not NIOSH approved. Workers often do not use hearing protectors properly, and they interfere with communication. If earplugs are removed for a short period in order to communicate, there can be immediate and irreparable injury. Even double protection (earplugs and earmuffs) is inadequate when exposure exceeds 105 dB.

Manufacturers mislead the public with overstated marketing claims. A Dow Industrial company markets their “Professional Earmuff” as “Our Highest-NRR Rated Earmuff (30 Decibels), Patented Twin Cup Design.” The really small print in the inside of the box states the Company:

[M]akes no warranty as to the suitability of NRR as a measure of actual protection from any noise level since such protection depends on the sound level (loudness), how long you listen to the loud sound, and how well you fit the earplugs (sic) in your ears…The NRR is based on the attenuation of continuous noise and may not be an accurate indicator of the protection attainable against impulsive noise such as gunfire…[Company] recommends reducing the NRR by 50% for estimating the average amount of noise reduction provided.

Furthermore, no type of hearing protection or noise canceling device protects against low frequency sounds, which travel through your body causing stress and may damage unborn children. Accordingly, NIOSH’s primary recommendation of the most effective way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is to “remove hazardous noise from the workplace or remove the worker from hazardous noise.”

If you follow the primary CDC and NIOSH guideline, avoiding noisy places, it results in the same isolation, depression, and other issues associated with hearing impairment. The only healthy solution is requiring safe amplified sound levels so no hearing protection is necessary–it doesn’t cost anything to Turn Up the Quiet.™ There are many architecturally safe and pleasing ways to reduce sound levels in public places: breaking up an open floor plan, using materials that absorb or diffuse sound on wall and ceiling surfaces, installing carpeting, curtains, and tapestries, and using attractive acoustic panels, to name a few. It is also good for business.

After meeting with a local health club, they agreed to institute a new “quiet” class with no amplified music on a trial basis. Management was surprised to hear positive comments from members who had simply stopped coming to classes due to the unsafe volumes. They learned that some members with hearing aids took them out, put in earplugs, and still found the classes unbearable. In a few months they added two more quiet classes.

It’s OK to ask the grocery store, the clothing store, and other retailers to turn off the amplified music while you are shopping. Many will happily accommodate you, and it encourages others to do the same. Some businesses are establishing regular “quiet” hours of operation and finding more satisfied, and even new, customers who spend more time at the establishment.

In addition, “silent discos” are gaining popularity, where instead of amplifying music through speakers it is “silently” delivered via Wi-Fi to smartphones for patrons to listen without disturbing others. The local mayor wants to try it as part of the Summer Concerts in the Park series. It will allow those who may not want amplification to enjoy the Park, and won’t interfere with nearby businesses or residents. The same technology can be applied to other music events such as outdoor exercise, and speech events, such as public ceremonies, political speakers, and other large public gatherings.

These and other creative ways to avoid unsafe levels will allow all of us to fully participate and enjoy public gatherings without the risk of injury.

John Drinkwater is a composer, musician, and attorney with a background that includes science and architecture studies. He is the founder of secondhandsound.org, and he also owns the trademark Turn Up the Quiet™ All Rights Reserved.

Originally posted at The Quiet Coalition.

Text Copyright 2017 John Drinkwater
Photo Copyright 2014 secondhandsound.org
All rights reserved

CDC research on non-occupational noise-induced hearing loss

The Hearing Journal addresses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) February 2017 Vital Signs issue on noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), focusing on the CDC’s findings with regard to non-occupational NIHL. CDC scientists Yulia Carroll, MD, PhD, and John Eichwald, MA, write about the medical community inquiries the CDC received on the topic of hearing loss related to noise in non-occupational settings, and discuss the research relied on in producing the Vital Signs’ NIHL issue.

Carroll and Eichwald write that “[m]any people may not recognize that loud noise from common activities, such as mowing the lawn or attending sporting events, can be as loud as the noise found in the workplace and is enough to damage hearing.”  They note that “it is important to raise public awareness that the louder the noise and the longer the exposure, the more likely hearing damage will occur.” After all, prevention of disease is an important CDC goal, and, as the authors write, “[n]oise-induced hearing loss is a preventable health condition that can be avoided by using relatively easy measures.”

Unfortunately, “[t]here are no federal guidelines on safe noise exposures” for the public, but Carroll and Eichwald suggest that that could change:

Because noise-induced hearing damage accumulates over time, there is a need for future research about noise exposure and prevention at younger ages. CDC is working with various organizations and continues to analyze national data to prioritize public health needs.

The CDC takes on noise-induced hearing loss

Photo credit: Raed Mansour

Dr. Daniel Fink, Chair of The Quiet Coalition, writes about the “flurry of activity” at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with regard to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Dr. Fink states that in the past the CDC offered “a lot of information about occupational noise exposure” and “screening neonates for congenital deafness,” but had no advice for the general public about noise.

But that has changed.

From May 2016, the CDC has issued a Morbidity and Mortality Report and Vital Signs publication on NIHL, and just recently posted new or recently revised information about how loud noise damages hearing and advice to seniors on preventing NIHL. While he isn’t surprised by the CDC’s robust response to what they identify as the “third most common chronic health condition in the US,” Dr. Fink notes that he and the other founding members of The Quiet Coalition are grateful that the CDC has stepped up efforts to help protect the nation’s hearing health.

Consumer Reports looks at affordable solutions to hearing loss:

No More Suffering in Silence? Julia Calderone, Consumer Reports, has written a thoughtful piece about hearing loss and the toll it takes on those who suffer from it.  Calderone states that hearing loss “has long been thought of as an inevitable part of getting older, more a nuisance than a life-altering medical condition—at least by those not experiencing it.”  But that opinion is changing, she asserts, as “the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) have published reports calling untreated hearing loss a significant national health concern­, one that’s associated with other serious health problems, including depression and a decline in memory and concentration.”

Calderone not only treats hearing loss with the seriousness it deserves, she offers solutions to sufferers, particularly those who can’t afford to buy hearing aids, which “cost an average of $4,700 per pair in 2013.”  This is a very steep price, particularly since hearing aids are usually not covered by health insurance or Medicare.  To help with those who need hearing aids but can’t afford them, Calderone reviews a handful of hearing aid alternatives, namely personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), to see if they can fill the gap for those who need hearing aids but can’t afford to buy them.

Two PSAPs not covered in Calderone’s review are also worth considering: Doppler Labs HERE One and Nuheara’s IQbuds.  Neither company markets their PSAPs as a hearing aid or hearing aid substitute, but at around $300 a pair they offer personal amplification and soundscape management to people who might have no other options.

And a final thought about the sorry state of hearing health in the U.S.: For people who are suffering noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), the personal and economic costs could have been avoided in the first place because NIHL is 100% preventable.