Tag Archive: concert

Remember all those concerts you went to?

does, and he still is a regular concert goer since he’s been a music journalist for more than 30 years. He saw a lot of great shows, but he also learned the hard way that loud concerts take their toll. And he shares his hard-won knowledge in his excellent article, “You’re Losing Hearing Faster Than You Think.”

Browne starts his piece with a discussion about the increase in hearing loss, stating that it is “likely due to a constant assault of noise” and adding that we have “become so accustomed to blaring sound” that our definition of what is loud has changed. He interviews Robert Jackler, chair of otolaryngology at Stanford, who asks, “Are we going to see people lose their hearing at an earlier age, and lose it more severely as time goes by?,” and emphatically answers, “Yes.”

Browne talks about his concern for his own hearing as well as his daughter’s, adding that for as long as he knew him, his father wore a hearing aid. Browne looks at the stigma attached to hearing aids, noting that there is no stigma attached to wearing eyeglasses. Along with the stigma, there are the psychological manifestations of hearing loss, namely isolation and depression. This discussion follows Browne’s visit to an audiologist and his “sobering” results–a diagnosis of sloping high-frequency loss.

In light of his audiology exam, Browne’s goal for himself was to prevent further damage. To do that, his audiologist suggests two options: The first was to get fitted ear plugs to wear at loud events, and the second, which Browne found depressing, was that he consider getting hearing aids.

In the end, Browne opts for the ear plugs, “for now,” and he lists six things everyone can do to protect their hearing, including downloading a decibel meter and wearing ear plugs. To read the entire article and see the full list of protective steps, click the second link above.

 

 

Are loud concerts bad for Beyoncé’s unborn twins?

Tom Avril, Phillynews.com, writes about the impact of loud music on the unborn. Avril notes that “[r]esearchers cannot perform a controlled laboratory study, because it would be unethical to expose pregnant women to anything that might damage a fetus,” but he adds that there are “a few observational studies of pregnant women who work in noisy environments.”  Sadly, the conclusion of those studies is mixed. Avril cites a 2016 study on prenatal noise exposure in Sweden that revealed that for “women in a workplace with sound levels above 85 decibels, children exposed in utero were slightly more likely to suffer impaired hearing than children born to mothers whose workplaces measured below 75 decibels.”  But other studies, he states, did not find noise to be a problem.

Avril speaks to Lindsay Bondurant, a pediatric audiologist at Salus University in Elkins Park, who offers that while a one time exposure to a concert should be fine, chronic exposure could be a problem. Rock concerts can reach much higher decibel levels than one would typically be exposed to–up to 120 decibels. Catherine Palmer, director of audiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, explains that exposure is different for the fetus than its mother, because “the sound travels through the mother’s abdomen.”  She cautions, however, that “timing of the exposure may matter, as well, depending on the developmental stage of the auditory pathway.”

So, what should one do?  With conflicting and incomplete information, we would err on the side of caution. As Pediatric audiologist Bondurnat opined, exposure to the sound at one concert should be fine. So unless you are Beyonce, keep your exposure to loud sound to one concert during a pregnancy.  And don’t forget to bring ear plugs to the one concert you attend. Developing a practice of using ear protection in loud spaces will come in handy once your child is old enough to attend noisy events with you.  After all, it will be easier to get your child to wear ear plugs if she sees her parents doing it.

Update: Before this post was published, the NY Times reported that Beyonce pulled out of Coachella ‘Following the Advice of Her Doctors’.  Apparently her doctors advised her to keep a less rigorous schedule.  We like to think that they suggested some quiet time too.

 

This would have been great if you were a Beyonce fan:

Beyonce gig was heard eight miles away.

But not so much if you’re not a fan.

Q: If the concert can be heard eight miles away, what is the sound system doing to the ears of the concert goers?

A: Invest in hearing aid companies.  Sadly, that will be a growth industry.