Tag Archive: Daniel Fink MD

Is this the most thoughtful birthday present ever?

Photo credit: Dave Crosby licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

In California, on his or her birthday a 16-year-old gets a driver’s license and, if he or she is lucky, a car.

One Dutch town is thinking about what may be an even better birthday present, the gift of good hearing: Dutch town considers giving birthday earplugs to all 16-year-olds.

Link via @QuietEdinburgh.

University of Kansas “wins” title for loudest crowd roar at an indoor sports arena

by Daniel Fink, MD

Maybe one day the Guinness Book of World Records will have a category for the most people sustaining auditory damage at one time at an indoor sports event? Because that’s what happened in Lawrence, Kansas, at the University of Kansas’ Allen Fieldhouse on February 13, 2017. A new world record was set for indoor noise at a sports event: 130.4 decibels. The previous “winner,” the University of Kentucky’s Rupp Arena, set a record of 126.4 decibels just two weeks earlier.

It was a great game, undoubtedly sold out. Kansas won in overtime, coming back from a 67-60 deficit with 1:13 to play in regulation to tie the game, and then won in overtime. The few disheartened fans who left early missed the conclusion of a one of the season’s best basketball games. Famed Kansas coach Bill Self called it “the most remarkable win I’ve ever been a part of.” But his ears, the players’ ears, the ears of team and fieldhouse staff, and those of the capacity crowd of 16,300, undoubtedly also suffered permanent auditory damage. That’s because 130.4 decibels is about as loud as a four-engine jet plane from 100 feet away, but the auditory injury threshold (the point at which a hearing injury may occur) is only 75 to 78 decibels.

Maybe one day the NCAA, which touts “Student-Athlete Well-Being” as one of its core principles, will show some concern for the auditory health of its student-athletes and ban this type of silly and dangerous competition at NCAA events.

But if not, then how about a contest to see how many NCAA student athletes and sports event attendees can be blinded at one time by the host NCAA institution shining powerful laser lights into the stands and team benches at the sports arena?  Hey, a world record is a world record, right?

Or maybe reason will prevail and the people who have the power to stop this senseless and dangerous contest will come to their senses?  They can’t say that they didn’t have notice, because my letter to the editor of The Kansas City Star was published on Monday, February 20th.  Your move, NCAA.

Dr. Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area.  He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Anemic? See your doctor and get your iron tablets, stat:

Iron Deficiency Anemia Tied to Hearing Loss.  Iron deficiency anemia should be relatively easy to manage. So see your doctor, get a blood test, and manage your anemia.

That said, Dr. Daniel Fink, a leading noise activist, cautions that the study appears to be a preliminary one. The study reviewed data from approximately 300,000 deidentified adult patient records at Milton K. Hershey Medical Center in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The diagnosis of hearing loss was made by mention of one or more diagnostic codes for hearing loss on at least one encounter. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia was made from laboratory tests. Then statistical analyses were performed. No audiometric tests were done, and the prevalence of hearing loss was much lower than that reported in other studies.  Dr. Fink thinks this report might help guide future research, but the fact remains that noise exposure, not iron deficiency anemia, is the major cause of hearing loss in the United States.

Always read the fine print when a study comes out trivializing noise complaints

Daniel Fink, MD, and Jamie L. Banks, PhD, MSc, have written an intriguing article about NextGen, The Mercatus Center (funded by the arch conservative Koch brothers), and aircraft noise. In “Airplane Noise is a Health Hazard,” Fink and Banks write that the Mercatus Center study “labels those who complain about airport noise as NIMBYs…conveniently ignor[ing] a large body of medical research showing that airplane noise increases the risk of morbidity and mortality, [and] trivializ[ing] the seriousness of a problem affecting the health and well-being of millions of Americans.”  It’s a very thoughtful and well-cited piece that is worth a careful read.

Shortly after Fink and Banks’ article was published, an article appeared in the Chicago Sun Times about the soaring costs in test program to insulate historic homes near O’Hare ($101,000 per home, not an insignificant amount). Interestingly, the Mercatus Center study somehow ignored the damage to property value borne by homeowners living under NextGen flight paths while it was categorizing people suffering from continuous aircraft noise as a “handful” of NIMBYists .