Tag Archive: David M. Sykes

Good news about helicopter overflights? Stayed tuned.

Photo credit: Prayitno  licensed under CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

On August 31, the Federal Aviation Administration finally complied with Congress’s now-20-year-old “National Parks Air Tour Management Act of 2000” that requires the FAA to actively reduce and manage helicopter traffic over national parks and monuments. That’s right–it’s taken 20 years. Will anything change now? That remains to be seen, but the decades-long battle with the FAA to constrain noisy and dangerous helicopter sight-seeing flights seems to stumble from one tragic accident to the next. So it may continue until either (1) somebody invents a truly quiet and safe helicopter, or (2) communities–and smaller federal agencies like the National Park Service–finally gain local control over their airspace, or (3) the head of the FAA, who happens to be Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s wife, Elaine Chao, leaves after the upcoming election, and the incoming president appoints somebody who will listen to the public’s concerns about noise and safety.

Please note that there’s already a proposed new Congressional Act on the table in DC called “The Safe and Quiet Skies Act of 2019.” It was offered by Hawaii Congressman Ed Case, who says that “[t]here’s a groundswell of opposition to these [helicopter overflight] tours….[but] the FAA has shown no interest in regulating this industry.”

Case himself keeps his eye on Flight Radar24 to stay on top of the problems encountered by his constituents back home in Hawaii. He also sits on DC’s growing, 48-member Congressional Quiet Skies Caucus. Since the 2016 election of Donald Trump, this caucus has grown significantly—enough to twist arms and win noise-control concessions during the struggle over the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

The point is that there’s now an organized and growing group of members of Congress who are paying attention to the aircraft noise issue, and they’ve shown they can get something done. Now let’s hope they’ll grow again in the election this November and flex some muscle over the next Congress beginning in 2021.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Quieter, cleaner future is Airbus’ newly-announced goal

Image courtesy of Airbus

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

One hundred and twenty years ago, two Ohio bicycle makers, the Wright Brothers, founded the aircraft industry by developing the world’s first motorized airplane. Now the technology leadership of that industry is lifting off for the EU, where the multi-national EADS (Airbus) is headquartered. On September 21st, Airbus announced a major, strategic initiative called “InNOVAtion” that lassos all of the technology advances in physics, materials science, and electrically powered flight and ties them to the global demand for aircraft that can be significantly cleaner, environmentally sustainable, and quieter.

This is a very big deal as anyone in the aircraft industry will attest–2020 marks an early stage of what is already understood to be a significant and necessary transformation of this huge, and very rich, industry which has been America’s leading, federally-supported export since WWII.

But this is not the first time the Wright brothers’ invention has been taken over by outsiders. When America’s power brokers turned up their noses at the two under-educated Ohio bicycle-builders fledgling innovation, Germany enthusiastically encouraged the Wrights, and by WWII Germany was far ahead in both internal combustion-fueled and rocket-fueled flight. Germany’s dominance in the early stages of WWII provoked the U.S.’s competitive drive to re-capture the industry, something that was only accomplished with the help of thousands of German scientists who emigrated here after WWII.

Why aren’t Boeing and it’s engine partner GE—those once unbeatable, rich and globally domineering hegemons—taking the lead in the current re-invention of this extraordinarily successful, American industry? That’s a long story but it includes their cozy, undemanding relationship with the FAA and their short-term, Wall Street-driven focus on shareholder return instead of innovation.

Here at Quiet Communities, Inc. and The Quiet Coalition, we’ve focused for nearly a decade on a method we call “Push-Pull.” Push-Pull achieves change by focusing on both pushing government and communities to envision quieter, cleaner futures, and pulling companies and communities to accelerate development of technologies and methods that deliver the products and solutions we all need for healthier lives and an environmentally sustainable world.

So we’re thrilled to see Airbus embracing it’s leadership role and leading the way. Maybe their initiative will wake up and push the FAA, Boeing, GE, the Department of Defense, and Congress so that they understand that cozy, undemanding relationships backed by gigantic government subsidies are a recipe for losing a vital industry, not for growing it.

Our colleague Arline Bronzaft sent me this wonderful quote: “It’s time for all to come together and to come to grips with the problem of aviation noise, and to build, at long last, an air transportation system that is safe, healthy and quieter.” Arline was being ironic–the statement was delivered at a conference 44 years ago, on April 5, 1976, by EPA leader Russell Train.

Maybe the new competition from Airbus will change some entrenched minds in Washington and Seattle so that Russell Train’s statement will take on a second life.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Companies urged to hire “Chief Sound Officers”

Photo credit: Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

My first reaction to this article by Frank Fitzpatrick in Forbes advising companies to hire “Chief Sound Officers” was that the author’s tongue was firmly planted in his cheek. But no, he’s making some very valid points that corporate leaders could learn from: sound matters to business in lots of ways that deserve consideration.

As Fitzpatrick says, “You may not be in the sound business, but sound is in your business.” He notes that ambient noise level in retail spaces and workplaces has important effects on customer behavior and satisfaction, and on employee satisfaction and productivity.

I’m most taken by his discussion of hearables technologies coming to market now like the Apple iWatch with built-in sound meter. But there’s much more than that coming out of R&D labs to connect biometric data to wearable technologies on the assumption that informed consumers are more likely to be healthier too.

As Dr. Daniel Fink says: if it sounds loud, it is TOO loud. But if you’re used to ignoring noise, having a warning system on your wrist, a wearable device like an iWatch with a built-in sound meter, could be very helpful, and if enough people use it, that would be good for public health.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

The future of work is…quieter?

Photo credit: K2 Space licensed under CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The 2020 pandemic has office designers dreaming up healthier, greener offices—don’t let them forget noise.

This article in NPR appeared in September as people were sending their kids to schools and dreaming of going back to work. While all of those office buildings have stood empty for many months, the people who design, build, and operate office buildings have been dreaming too about how to make offices healthier places to work: windows that open to let in fresh air, HVAC systems with good air filtration built into them, “green” plant-walls, touchless elevators and doors, doorless bathroom entries, and lots of hand-washing stations.

But nobody mentioned quiet and privacy–about wanting places where you can concentrate and work without disruption. This is not a new problem. And it certainly needs to be factored into anybody’s “office of the future” if the goal is to reduce unnecessary stress and increase the ability of “knowledge-workers” to do the thought-work they’re being paid for. I wrote about this with my health acoustics colleague Bill Cavanaugh for the U.S. General Services Administration a while back.

So if you’re dreaming of what kind of ideal working conditions you’d like to have when the world goes back to work in 2021, don’t forget that quiet and the sounds of nature are as important to your mental health and your motivation to work as windows and greenery and hand sanitizer stations!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Innovative design key to quieter aircraft

Photo credit: Courtesy of Otto Aviation

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article from CNN covers one of the odder looking innovations in aircraft design, the Celera by the California-based company Otto Aviation. It looks more like a gas-filled dirigible than a fixed-wing aircraft. But what it really demonstrates is how much room there is for improvements in aircraft design. Otto Aviation has focused on reducing power requirements–which also reduces noise levels–by optimizing “laminar flow.”

Their Celera 500L bullet plane results in a much lighter aircraft with much higher fuel efficiency and a much smaller engine. Marvelous! Doubtless, they’ve also taken great care to reduce the plane’s weight by using innovative materials.

The author of the CNN piece calls 2020 “the strangest year in aviation history” because of all the turmoil. Namely, Boeing’s grounded and deadly 737MAX, the COVID-19 pandemic, the emergence of commercially-available, electrically-powered aircraft, and the growing concern about the astonishing impact of air travel on the environment. And certainly some of the emerging aircraft we’re seeing are strange looking indeed. But as economist Paul Romer said, “a crisis is a terrible thing to waste.” So maybe we’ll look back on this period as one of remarkable innovation that is hopefully leading to a quieter and more environmentally-sustainable future.

But please note that these innovative designs are coming not from Boeing and it’s engine-partner GE. Both of those behemoths are looking a lot like dying dinosaurs right now. The innovations are coming from well-funded startups, Celera being one of a few in the U.S. Most of the innovators appear to be in the EU, where both environmental and noise issues are taken seriously and where industry leaders like Airbus and Siemens are solidly behind the next wave of innovation.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

2017 study prompts action on noise in parks

Photo credit: Louis from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Quiet is possible and scientific study is catalyzing action. This study reported in Science three years ago prompted meaningful recent action by Quiet Parks International, which in turn prompted media coverage on WNYC by Tanzina Vega on her program “The Takeway.

Listen to Vega interview Matt Mikkelsen, the executive director of QPI’s Wilderness Quiet Program–a bold and ambitious re-framing of Gordon Hempton’s initiative “One Square Inch of Silence” initiative. Congratulations to everyone involved!

What this shows is that the confusing mosaic of scientists, activists and media people can occasionally converge to make change happen. All it takes is cooperation.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Twenty Thousand Hertz podcast reaches big audiences with well-told stories about noise

Photo credit: Magda Ehlers from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Sound designer, Dallas Taylor produces a wonderful podcast called Twenty Thousand Hertz that is a joy to listen to. So far he has produced 45 episodes that cover a broad range of “stories behind the world’s most recognizable and interesting sounds.”

Recently he teamed up with TED and Apple Podcasts so now he’s reaching big audiences, which is terrific for those of us who are concerned about the effects of noise on health and environment.

A friend urged me to listen to an episode called “City That Never Sleeps,” in which Taylor interviews a New York City-based writer who discovered that her perpetual anxiety was the result of noise exposure, so she took some simple precautions that others may want to consider. The prodcasts includes a couple of compilations of “nature sounds” that you might want to bookmark. Enjoy!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

German motorcyclists protest against new noise regs

Photo credit: Stephen Elson licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

We wrote recently about Germany’s new regulations concerning motorcycle noise. Today, NPR notes that Germany’s motorcycle enthusiasts are loudly protesting against those regulations.

Just imagine what would happen in the U.S. if the U.S. Department of Transportation tried to enforce their own motorcycle noise regulations. Yes, they exist, but no local, state, or federal authority is enforcing them.

Imagine America’s streets filled with raging, hog-riding Hells Angels and fellow travelers protesting their First Amendment right to “freedom of speech” and their Second Amendment right to protest by carrying guns while invading cities and towns—and holding state houses and town halls hostage.

Invasion of the Goths! MadMax come alive! What a nightmare.

I hope we soon see a massive shift to electric motorcycles as the next generation of millennial riders pushes noisy hog-riding Boomers off the pavement, because it’s going to take a massive demographic shift to end the racket.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Brooklyn Navy Yard gives birth to quiet electric motorcycle

Brooklyn Navy Yard    Photo credit: Dsigman48 licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Founded in 1801, Brooklyn Navy Yard’s sprawling 350-acre site overlooks Manhattan and has seen a lot of innovation—including construction of the Civil War ironclad, USS Monitor https://brooklynnavyyard.org/about/history. At it’s peak during WWII, the yard employed 70,000 people. But ship building at the Yard ended long ago, and now it’s home to hundreds of innovative enterprises including a movie studio.

Among those companies is a young company called Tarform funded by a California venture-capital firm and conceived by a young New Yorker, via Stockholm, Sweden, named Taras Kravtchouk, an industrial designer who is building an absolutely gorgeous, all-electric motorcycle using sustainable materials. Even the motorcycle’s “leather” seat is made from plant materials, not animal hide, and there’s no conventional plastic either—because he’s found substitutes made from biodegradable, natural materials.

Of course, we’re interested because electric motorcycles do not use petroleum and are extremely quiet—as well as impressively powerful. But this bike is also unbelievably beautiful.

As Karavtchouk say, “[b]eauty is its own form of sustainability; no one want to throw away something gorgeous.”

There are a quite a number of electric motorcycles coming onto the market—including several models from American “hog” manufacturer Harley Davidson, whose company executives are aware that their stalwart customers—Boomers—are aging out of the market and GenX and Millennials are much more interested in quiet, powerful, electric rides. But the new Tarform is a real knockout in the looks department:


We have nothing to gain from praising it but just can’t pass up the opportunity to point it out.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

On the pursuit of quiet

Photo credit: Simon Clayton from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition’s Vice Chair, David Sykes, writes about the pursuit of quiet in this essay in the Summer issue of Tinnitus Today, the quarterly publication of the American Tinnitus Association.

David writes about George Prochnik’s, “In Pursuit of Silence,” which Patrick Shen developed into a documentary with the same name.

As David notes, people generally don’t want silence. They want quiet. This was true before the coronavirus pandemic caused the world to quiet down, and it’s still true.

I have read the book and viewed the documentary, and recommend both.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.