Tag Archive: David M. Sykes

Havana mystery: Weaponized sound or ‘spooky action at a distance’?

U.S. Embassy in Havana | Photo credit: Escla licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Albert Einstein never accepted quantum physics, proving that geniuses don’t know everything. One phenomenon he couldn’t explain—now known as “quantum entanglement”–he simply dismissed as “spooky action at a distance.” But it has lately (decades after Einstein’s death) been proven.

Something else that’s not understood yet is the odd case of “weaponized sound” that appears to have sickened people at the U.S. embassy in Havana, Cuba. This piece in Wired Magazine, as well as this article in The New York Times, are by far the best so far on this mysterious and unexplained situation.

If you, like we, have been pondering this, wondering if an LRAD was involved or perhaps some secret source of weaponized infrasound or ultrasound, don’t expect a definitive answer just yet. Adam Rogers, the author of the Wired piece, and Carl Zimmer, of The New York Times, dug deeper than most and even talked to some scientists (in the U.S. and Russia) to see what, in anything, anybody knows. The answer is this: it’s still a mystery, but stay tuned because they’re gradually eliminating possibilities. The most probable scenario involves a combination of ototoxic chemical exposure with some form of weaponized sound. Yes, there are many ototoxic chemicals and drugs, that is, chemicals and drugs the exposure to which can destroy your hearing, including several chemotherapy drugs.

Is this kind of lethal combo possible? Probable? Likely?

Whatever it is, it apparently is NOT an LRAD. Yes, it’s true that LRAD’s are being distributed to and used by police forces since 2009, but whatever has been going on in Havana, that’s not the answer. Stay tuned.

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

Researchers confirm cheaper hearables work as well as hearing aids

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Several Johns Hopkins researchers reported some research in the Journal of the American Medical Association that tested the notion that a cheap ($200-$400) unregulated “hearable” (also known as a personal sound amplification product or PSAP) may be a convenient and inexpensive alternative to a hearing aid.

The researchers tested a handful of the new hearable products just coming on the market and, sure enough, they perform as well as, or nearly as well as, expensive ($2000-$5000 per ear) hearing aids made by the “Big Six.” The Big Six are six companies that have controlled the hearing aid industry; their products are regulated in the U.S. by the Food and Drug Administration.

Recently legislation passed by Congress and signed into law just before the August recess, about which we have written earlier, requires the FDA to de-regulate, i.e. to take a hands-off approach to this new class of high-tech hearing devices. As a result, these new products can be sold over the counter, without a prescription.

Will you need to take them to an audiologist to get them fitted? Certainly you may choose to do so, and that may be the best option, particularly if you are concerned that improper use might endanger your hearing. But with a conventional hearing aid, patients were required to pay professional fees to an audiologist for fittings, etc., resulting in a bundled price that made the hearing aids unobtainable for many people who needed them. You can certainly expect to read articles claiming that these new devices pose a danger. Henceforth, it’s up to the consumer to decide—as he or she already does with regard to many other healthcare products, including over-the-counter drugs that formerly required a doctor’s prescription.

We say caveat emptor (buyer beware), but welcome these new products that cost 1/10th the price of conventional hearing aids. They are suitably priced to be able to meet the needs of 48 million Americans with noise-induced hearing loss, many of whom cannot afford the $4000 to $10,000 price tag for conventional hearing aids. Voters seem to want de-regulation—this is it!

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

 

Here’s the best mass-media article on noise-induced hearing loss

Photo credit: rainy city licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

By David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Despite impacting 48 million Americans, noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has languished in the shadows for decades. But that’s changing! Check out the 17-page beautifully illustrated article in the September issue of Real Simple magazine*, a Time/Life publication with 8.5 million readers nationwide (that’s eight times larger than the New York Times readership of 1.1 million).

If you’ve been looking for a “quick overview” you can hand to friends and family who fail to understand America’s unrecognized problem with hearing loss—whether it’s your kids’ and their constant earbud (ab)use, friends who can’t understand conversations when you’re dining out, or an elderly relative who’s stopped paying attention and is increasingly depressed—this article should get the conversation started. And if they ask “what else can I read about this?” Tell them to look at this issue of Scientific American, new information from the Centers for Disease Control, and this one-page Fact Sheet on the health effects of noise that The Quiet Coalition (TQC) published in 2016.

It’s clear that NIHL is, as TQC’s chair, Daniel Fink, MD, says, “a growing problem in America nearing epidemic proportions.” But there’s a lot of work to do to get people (including the nation’s leaders) to understand that this is a legitimate public health problem. Frankly, the European Union and Asia are far ahead of us on this issue.

In the meantime, take heart: major media are beginning to notice! Congratulations to the editor of Real Simple for recognizing this growing health crisis. We are extremely grateful that her magazine cited three of TQC’s Steering Committee experts in this piece–Rick Neitzel, PhD, Arline Bronzaft, PhD, and Bradley Vite–and also
described two practical success stories. We hope Real Simple will continue to cover this issue and give it the attention it deserves.

We have only one complaint: the magazine erroneously states that 85 dB is the threshold of hearing damage. In fact, research has shown that permanent hearing damage starts at noise levels as low as 75 dB; furthermore, non-audiological health effects, such as cardiovascular effects, can be caused by noises as low as 55 dB.

*NOTE: the best place to find Real Simple magazine may be at the checkout counter at Whole Foods or a local book store. Or you can get it here.

Originally posted at The Quiet Coalition.

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

How to make an effective noise complaint

Photo credit: George Miller

By David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Mad enough to take your noise complaint to city hall? Be prepared. It’s essential to present well-organized factual evidence that will convince your mayor or city council members that noise is “much more than a nuisance,” it’s a public health problem. Your case must be based on facts, precedents, examples from other communities, and solutions that are practical and enforceable.

One organization you can rely on for guidance is GrowNYC, a great resource to help you build your case. If you’re surprised that New York City has an effective noise control program, don’t be. “The city that never sleeps” has made steady progress toward becoming a quieter, more livable place. But it only happened because impassioned citizens worked with former mayor Michael Bloomberg, along with his environmental commissioner and staff, who supported the idea that “quality of life” in New York City needed to include peace and quiet. In 2009, the City rolled-out a new noise control code that is being studied by communities all over the world.

The battle isn’t over even though it has been going on for decades. Case in point: the legendary Arline Bronzaft, PhD, who has worked through five successive NYC mayors. Dr. Bronzaft, who is a founding member of the Quiet Coalition, has been an irresistible force at GrowNYC. She’s a scientist who is familiar with the laws governing noise, and she knows her stuff—particularly how to integrate research into her arguments. At the GrowNYC website you’ll find abundant resources—many written by Dr. Bronzaft–that can help you build a strong body of evidence and precedents to support noise control measures in your own community. Happy reading!

New York City isn’t the only place to look. You might also consider Portland, Oregon, or South Hampton, Long Island or any of a growing number of communities where mayors and town councils—spurred on by citizens–have been working to achieve peace and quiet for residents and visitors.

Originally posted at The Quiet Coalition.