Tag Archive: Dr. Daniel Fink

What is a normal noise level for humans?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

What is normal noise for humans? That probably depends on whether you are asking about modern life or about our pastoral past life. In the 1960s, researchers measured excellent hearing and very low ambient noise levels in the nomadic Mabaan population in the southern Sudan and the Kalahari Bushmen in South Africa. But modern life is much noisier.

On an alpine hike in the Austrian Tirol in September, I strolled through the meadow behind me in the photo. I pulled out my iPhone 6 and measured the sound with the Faber Sound Meter 4 app, which has been shown to be almost as accurate as a certified sound meter. The reading was in the low 40-decibel range. That noise came from the wind, distant road traffic noise, and an occasional distant airplane.

This is what humans, including those living in agrarian regions until agriculture was mechanized in the twentieth century, experienced. No motorcycle exhausts, no diesel engines, no helicopters. And restaurants didn’t have amplified music, either.

Humans didn’t evolve in noise. We evolved in quiet. We don’t have protective mechanisms against chronic loud noise exposure. And in an answer to the question at the top of this piece, the normal noise level for humans is quiet.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Football stadium noise still here for another season

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

It’s been years since I’ve been to a college football game. The last games I attended were at the Los Angeles Coliseum, one of the quieter big-school stadiums, during the Pete Carroll era at USC. But I have read about and written a number of stories on stadium noise. Here is the latest story about the stadium noise at the University of Oregon’s Autzen Stadium.

This article, like every other article about stadium noise, says the same things: the noise is distracting so the coaching staff makes the team practice with loud music being blasted at them. Why is it understood that the coach should “condition” his team rather than demand that the noise level be controlled? Simply put, crowd noise shouldn’t be a factor in a football game. What Coach Riley (and everyone else attending the game) doesn’t know is that if it’s loud enough to impact play on the field, it’s loud enough to cause auditory damage.

The Quiet Coalition is still waiting for the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and its member colleges and universities–many of which have medical schools, schools of public health, audiology programs, or all three–to do something to protect the hearing of their student athletes and those attending the games. At least this University of Tennessee audiology professor understands the problem, which is why she recommends that students use earplugs when they attend UT football games. Kudos Dr. Patti Johnstone! But rather than having students block the noise, why not demand that the university control the noise in the first instance?

And as this article shows, stadium noise is a factor in professional games, too. In fact, stadium noise probably contributed to the Los Angeles Chargers recent loss in Denver.

Should football games be decided on the field, or by the home crowd purposefully making too much noise for the visiting team to hear the play being called? Whatever happened to good sportsmanship?

Sadly, it appears the NCAA, professional football teams, and stadium owners won’t address noise until and unless someone sues them because they developed sudden hearing loss or tinnitus after attending a game. Let’s hope that happens before many players and fans suffer significant hearing loss or develop tinnitus.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Protecting your teenager from noise-induced hearing loss

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This piece suggests that you may decrease noise-induced hearing loss in your teenager by limiting personal music player listening to 60% of maximum volume for 60 minutes. I suppose anything is better than nothing, but I’m not sure how one precisely measures 60% of a personal music player’s volume. And if the one-hour limit is repeated several times a day–or the teen doesn’t follow this silly parental rule–I can guarantee that this approach won’t work.

My children are more than a decade past their teens now, so personal music players just weren’t an issue when they were younger. And I’m not sure how I would address the subject, either, but one approach might be to take them to a hearing aid store, or point out older people wearing hearing aids (in this case, one of them happens to be Grandpa) and then to tell them that a hearing aid is in their future if they don’t turn down the volume.

It’s hard for a parent to keep teenagers from doing unsafe or unhealthy things which may have lifelong consequences. The teen brain just isn’t wired that way. And saying to a teen that occasional exposure to loud noise damaging hearing is ok is just like telling him or her that occasional unprotected sex, heroin use, or driving without wearing a seatbelt is okay too, when, obviously, they are not.

The real responsibility for protecting our young falls to governments. We don’t allow people under 18 to smoke. We set an age at which a teenager can get a license to drive a car. They can’t drink alcohol until 21. And maybe they shouldn’t be listening to personal music players until age 15 or 18 as well. At a minimum, the Consumer Product Safety Commission should require warning labels to be placed on personal music players, headphones, and earbuds:

WARNING: USE OF THIS PRODUCT CAN CAUSE HEARING LOSS

Yes, smokers ignore warning labels, but the smoking rate among men has fallen from about 50% in the 1950s to near 20% today. And at least with smoking the government has tried to do something to protect Americans’ health. The federal government should target the causes of hearing damage now, or risk almost an entire generation marked by hearing loss.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

How to motivate millennials to protect their hearing at work

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition doesn’t spend much time worrying about occupational noise because our focus is on protecting the general public from noise. Workers’ ears are protected by regulations drafted and enforced by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and similar state agencies. Moreover, workers generally have health care for occupational injuries, and are compensated for work-related permanent damage (including hearing loss) by state-administered workers compensation systems. If occupational hearing loss is established, hearing aids may be provided for those with occupational hearing loss.

From time to time we will agree with the many observers who think that the occupational noise exposure limit–90 A-weighted decibels for 40 hours a week, 240 days a year, for 40 years, causing excess hearing loss in 25% of exposed workers–is set too high, but at least workers have that meager protection. There are no such protections for the public, and no compensation for hearing loss, either.

That said, we’re making an exception to share with you this well-written article in Occupational Health & Safety Magazine. It’s focused on preventing hearing loss in younger workers, but it provides good information for everyone who is concerned about their hearing.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

There is nothing inevitable or natural about chronic disease

Photo credit: Robbie Sproule licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This thoughtful piece talks about chronic disease, pointing out that it is not inevitable or natural. The author, Dr. Clayton Dalton, writes that:

[T]raditional cultures across the globe, from hunter-gatherers to pastoralists to horticulturists, have shown little evidence of chronic disease. It’s not because they don’t live long enough – recent analysis has found a common lifespan of up to 78 years among hunter-gatherers, once the bottlenecks of high mortality in infancy and young adulthood are bypassed. We can’t blame genes, since many of these groups appear to be more genetically susceptible to chronic disease than those of European descent.

So what is the reason for the absence of chronic illness among these cultures? “Evidence suggests it is how they live,” Dr. Dalton replies. And what factors do these different cultures share?  Dr. Dalton writes that the “common denominator [is] defined by the absence of modern banes: absence of processed foodstuffsabsence of sedentary lifestyle, and likely absence of chronic stressors.”

Dr. Dalton doesn’t specifically mention noise-induced hearing loss, but that’s another chronic disease that he could have included in his essay.

I spoke about this at the 12th Congress of the International Commission on the Biological Effects of Noise in Zürich in June. Similar to Dr. Dalton’s comments about hypertension and diabetes, I presented information showing that significant hearing loss is probably not part of normal aging, but represents noise-induced hearing loss.

A useful analogy for noise and hearing is sun and the skin. It turns out that skin and subcutaneous tissues sag as we age–that’s normal–but deep wrinkles, age spots, and skin cancers are the result of ultraviolet exposure. Similarly, I’m sure there are changes that occur in our hearing as we age, but profound hearing loss (25-40 decibel decrement in hearing) is most often the result of noise exposure.

In the end, how we live our lives matters. If we want to hear well into old age, we have to work to preserve our hearing all during our lives. How? It’s easy: avoid loud noise or wear ear protection if you can’t.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Who is to blame for noisy restaurants?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Noisy restaurants seem to be in the news these days. Almost every week, The Quiet Coalition comes across another article or television report about them. This piece from the Daily Mail is one of the few that provides names and numbers–the names of the restaurants and actual decibel readings from a sound level meter–and the sound levels they reported were loud enough to damage hearing.

What can you do to protect yourself? You don’t need a sound meter to know if it’s too loud (although we encourage everyone to install one on a smart phone–very accurate ones are available). The auditory injury threshold is only 75-78 A-weighted decibels (dBA). If you have to strain to speak or to hear while trying to have a normal conversation at 3-to-4 feet distance–the usual social distance for speaking or dining in the U.S.–the ambient noise is above 75 dBA, and your hearing is being damaged.

And once it’s gone, the only remedy is hearing aids.

So who is to blame for noisy restaurants? This report from Australia doesn’t blame anyone in particular, but suggests the culprit is minimalist design trends. We would add that crowded dining areas, low ceilings, and, of course, background music turned up to rock concert levels do not help.

Before the mass adoption of the industrial look in restaurant design, restaurants used to be carpeted, with drapery covering the windows, upholstered banquettes lining the walls, and white tablecloths covering every table. One went to a restaurant to dine and to converse. It is obvious that design trends have changed dramatically over the last two decades or so. Newer restaurant designs with open kitchens that allow the clanging of pots and pans to be heard in the dining area and hard floor and wall surfaces (e.g., glass, metal, polished cement, and tile) that reflect rather than absorb sound are certainly part of the problem.

As a result, restaurant noise is now the leading complaint of diners in many cities, according to the 2016 Zagat annual survey, and just barely in second place nationally, slightly behind bad service. As the twelve-step programs might say: First, you have to accept that you have a problem.

The important thing is that the problem of restaurant noise is finally being recognized, and now that we know that restaurant noise is a problem, we can start doing something about it. Some have suggested avoiding noisy restaurants or walking out if the restaurant is too noisy. But that isn’t a realistic choice in most cities. If one did that, one would never go to a restaurant. Instead, ask the manager to turn down the volume of amplified music, and if he or she refuses, tell them that you are leaving and will never return, and that you will tell everyone you know to avoid the place. Tell your city council and mayor that you want quieter restaurants. And post accurate and detailed reviews on Yelp, Open Table, and social media. Let the restaurant owner or manager, and those who read restaurant reviews on social media, know that “the food was excellent, but the place was so loud that we are never going back.”

If enough of us complain and demand quieter spaces, then restaurateurs will have to respond. Or they can ignore us at their peril.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Hearing loss is an occupational health hazard for musicians

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

It’s not surprising that hearing loss is an occupational health hazard for musicians, as highlighted in this recent report. After all, noise causes hearing loss. It doesn’t matter if the noise is from machinery in a factory, from a jet engine on the tarmac, or from loudspeakers at a rock concert. Whatever the source, the effect is the same.

And the type of music doesn’t matter, either, as noise-induced hearing loss is a problem for classical musicians, too.

The bottom line is this: hearing is precious. If hearing music is important to you–or hearing children or grandchildren speak, birds sing, whatever it is–protect your hearing.

How can you protect yourself? It’s easy. The auditory injury threshold is only 75-to-78 A-weighted decibels. That’s about the level at which ambient noise makes conversation difficult. If you are having a hard time having a conversation because of the ambient noise around you, it’s too loud. And if something sounds too loud, it IS too loud! Turn down the volume, leave the noisy place, always carry earplugs with you, and use them!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise discriminates–heavier burden unfairly borne by the poor and non-white

Photo credit: Alicia Nijdam licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Noise exposure has multiple effects on humans–it causes auditory disorders, interferes with learning, and disrupts sleep, causing increased cardiovascular disease and death, among other things. A new analysis of socioeconomic, racial, and spatial variation in noise exposure in the U.S. shows that the poor and nonwhite have greater exposure to noise than wealthier and nonminority populations.

Life may not be fair, but governments have a responsibility to try to make it more fair, and to protect all citizens from harm: rich and poor, white and non-white, native-born and immigrant. Those who often refer to the U.S. Constitution often seem to forget this, but the preamble includes a mandate to “promote the general Welfare.” A quieter environment for all Americans would appear to be part of this.

This also happens to be current federal law. The Noise Control Act of 1972 is still on the books, even if the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Noise Abatement and Control (ONAC) was defunded in 1982. Reasonable people understand that the EPA and ONAC will not be properly funded during this current administration, but at some future time the funding must be made available. Noise damages more than hearing, and it is simply unacceptable that poor and nonwhite Americans suffer greater noise exposure while the federal government stands by and does nothing to protect them.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

London’s poised to do something about noise

Photo credit: Majophotography licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 ES

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

In the U.S., noise is widely considered “just a nuisance,” but in Europe noise pollution is recognized as a major health hazard. In the current political climate, and with the current administration and Environmental Protection Agency administrator, we don’t expect anything to be done about noise here–just as climate change is viewed in Washington as a Chinese hoax–but other countries and regions accept the science.

The World Health Organization’s Global Burden of Disease report quantified the numbers of productive years of life lost due to noise. The European Noise Directive tells governments what to do about environmental noise. And now London is proposing a comprehensive environmental strategy, which includes very strong actions to deal with environmental noise.

We think London’s comprehensive environmental strategy is a wonderful model for cities and states in the U.S. to follow.

Please share this link with your state and local representatives or your governor.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise still a problem at U.S. Open

Photo credit: Malcolm Murdoch licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Last year, a new retractable roof installed over the Arthur Ashe Stadium at the site of the U.S. Open tennis tournament was roundly criticized for increasing the noise to unpleasant levels.The New York Times reports that before this year’s tournament began that changes were made to make the stadium quieter.

But still not enough for tennis star Rafael Nadal, who complained that the noise level interfered with his play, even as he won. At the highest levels of play, the sound of the ball coming off the racket imparts important information about velocity and spin, and when it’s too noisy, that sound can’t be heard. Nadal noted that other covered tennis stadiums–in Wimbledon and Australia–are quieter. Other players, however, were not as bothered as Nadal.

But noise in sport arenas is a problem for other sports, football in particular, where the fans make noise to interfere with play-calling. And, of course, it’s a health hazard, too.

With football season starting again, maybe this year the NCAA and NFL will join their tennis colleagues to do something about noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Originally posted at The Quiet Coalition.