Tag Archive: Dr. Daniel Fink

As restaurant noise rises, will diners take their money elsewhere?

Photo credit: Boon Low licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I added the question mark to the headline from this article by Debra Pressey in the Champaign-Urbana News-Gazette because I disagree with the headline. Pressey describes the research of University of Illinois professor Pasquale Bottalico, which found that even young people have difficulty conversing in noisy situations. He also asked them if the higher noise levels would make them less likely to dine in noisy restaurants, and they said, “Yes.” Professor Bottalico plans to repeat his research in an older population.

The only problem with the research–and the reason I added the question mark–is that most often there are no quiet restaurants to go to. This study by Greg Scott, founder of the SoundPrint restaurant noise app, documents the extent of the problem in Manhattan.

I anticipate that when sufficient data are gathered in other cities, similar sound levels will be reported.

Noise is a health and public health hazard.  Ambient noise in restaurants is also a disability rights issue. If enough people complain to enough local city council members, maybe something will be done to make restaurants quieter.

If the U.S. could make restaurants smoke-free, it can make them quieter, too.

DISCLOSURE. Dr. Fink serves as Medical Advisor to SoundPrint, which is mentioned in this article.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Will kids face an epidemic of hearing loss?

Photo credit: Jonas Mohamadi from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This interview of U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams and FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb discusses an unprecedented epidemic of vaping among teens. According to the FDA Commissioner and the Surgeon General, the epidemic caught public health authorities by surprise.

Use of personal music players, with associated headphones or earbuds, is also very common among teens. About 90% of teens have a personal music player of one sort or another. An article last year reported found auditory damage among 14% of Dutch schoolchildren age 9-11 who used personal music players. One might call this an epidemic of personal music player use.

It takes about 40 years of noise exposure for noise-induced hearing loss to become clinically apparent, so when today’s young people are in their 40s to 50s, they will likely be as hard of hearing as today’s people in their 60s, 70s, and 80s.

Since 2015, I have been trying to get those federal agencies responsible for protecting the public–the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Federal Trade Commission’s Division of Advertising Practices, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission–to take action to protect young people’s hearing. I’ve also communicated with the American Academy of Pediatrics, which educates parents about the dangers of sun exposure and tobacco smoke, but not about noise.

I’m going to add the Surgeon General to my list. A predecessor issued a Call to Action about skin cancer, but no one has said anything about noise in more than 50 years.

So far my appeals have largely been ignored.

So the question is this: Will there be an unprecedented epidemic of hearing loss in children and teens when they get older? And will those charged with protecting Americans’ health remember that they were warned?

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

They really don’t make music like they used to

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Greg Milner, the New York Times, discusses the changes in audio technology that make the average sound of popular songs louder. The piece is a fascinating look at how modern music is engineered to be loud–“loudness as a measure of sound within a particular recording.”

Milner states that “[m]any audio pros maintain that excessive loudness creates aural fatigue.”

I would add, “and doctors and audiologists also maintain that excessive loudness causes noise-induced hearing loss.”

Remember: if it sounds too loud, it is too loud. Protect your hearing before it’s too late.

Thanks to Arnold Gordon for bringing this article to our attention.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

What is sound tourism?

Photo credit: Ibrahim Asad from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

When Silencity wrote about the sea organ in Zadar, Croatia, I said to my wife, “we were there!” And I learned that there is a branch of tourism called sound tourism, for those who seek out places with unique sounds. There even is a website, Sound Tourism, to learn about interesting sounding places and acoustic.

If you want to enjoy the world’s sounds, you need to be able to hear them.

Protect your hearing.

Remember: if something sounds too loud, it IS too loud!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

CDC educates public about the dangers of noise

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Our contacts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have informed The Quiet Coalition that the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health will be educating the public about the dangers of noise exposure at sports events, via advertisements in official printed programs for NHL, NBA, and NFL games, including this year’s Super Bowl LIII. An example of the advertisement appears at the top of this post. One of the ads suggests that these efforts will even extend to NASCAR races.

Research done by the CDC showed that about 25% of American adults age 20-69 had noise-induced hearing loss, and that 53% of these people with NIHL had no major occupational exposure to loud noise. The hearing damage was occurring outside the workplace.

We applaud the CDC’s educational effort, but suspect that, as with creating the largely smoke-free environment we now enjoy, much more must be done. Namely, real change won’t happen until government regulations are promulgated that set standards for noise levels in different settings and require the use, or at least the offer, of hearing protection devices to attendees. Nothing less will protect the nation’s auditory health.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Silent airports on the rise?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This online article discusses the growing movement towards silent airports, which essentially are airports that have adopted limited overhead announcements. I think “quieter airports” would be a more accurate term, but by any name they very welcome.

Travel is stressful enough without being deafened by repeated announcements, most of which are unnecessary, at too high a volume. No one likes to wait for a plane, but the few quieter airports I’ve been in–London Heathrow comes to mind–make waiting much more pleasant.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

A review of ear muff hearing protection devices

Photo credit: Hunting Mark licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition does not endorse products, but does try to let people know about effective hearing protection devices. This article at NoisyWorld reviewing and rating ear  muffs may be helpful for two reasons: 1) it explains the science behind the Noise Reduction Rating measurements, and 2) it educates the reader about ear muff style hearing protection, discussing the pros and cons of several different models.

Of course, there are many more options than just those discussed in this article. Full-size ear muffs are big and bulky but they may be more comfortable than earplugs for longer-term use, while folding ear muffs may be easier to carry to loud sporting events.

A photographer once said to me, “the best camera is the one you have with you when the great shot is before your eyes.”

And the best hearing protection is what you are wearing when the ambient noise is too loud.

For certain situations–a subway commute, a noisy office, or prolonged work in a noisy environment or with noisy power tools–ear muffs may be the best option.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Restaurants are louder than ever, and here’s what’s being done about it

Photo credit: Herry Lawford licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article from the Buffalo News discusses restaurant noise and the many fixes that can be done to make existing restaurants quieter. I have met Paul Battaglia, the architecture professor mentioned in the article, at meetings of the Institute for Noise Control Engineering. As he explained to me then, and as he said in the article, restaurant noise is not an inevitable accompaniment to dining.

Some of us believe that noise is the new secondhand smoke. Sadly, it appears that when restaurants are busy, restaurant owners have no incentive to make restaurants quieter. Some self-identified libertarians have told me, “people don’t really want quiet restaurants. If they did, the ‘invisible hand’ of economics would lead to quieter restaurants being more popular than noisy ones, and the problem would be solved.”

My response is that the restaurant noise issue, just like the secondhand smoke issue, is an example of market failure. Obtaining quieter restaurants will likely require government action, as did obtaining smoke-free restaurants. People don’t yet understand that many restaurants are loud enough to damage hearing, or that ambient noise in restaurants, preventing speech comprehension in those with hearing loss, is a disability rights issue.

I am certain that when people understand that their hearing is being damaged, they will push their elected officials to set standards for quiet restaurants.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Human noise threatens marine life

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Noise is a health hazard and a public health hazard, causing auditory disorders (hearing loss, tinnitus, and hyperacusis) and non-auditory health problems, including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and death.

This report by Jim Robbins in the New York Times discusses the hazards of noise for marine life. Noise hurts marine mammals, fish, and even plankton.

An evolutionary biology perspective is helpful in understanding why noise is a problem. Loud noise is rare in nature. All creatures on land or in the sea evolved in quiet. That is the natural state, for plants, animals, and humans.

It looks like all living things need quiet to thrive.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The sound of winter

Photo credit: Valdemaras D. from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This delightful essay by Jennifer Finney Boylan in the New York Times discusses the differences between winter in Maine and winter in New York City.

Boylan writes that when she ventures out “on a subzero morning in Maine, it’s the silence that strikes me first.” No doubt it is a sharp contrast with the sound of the city in winter. In fact, Boylan adds, “[t]he most dramatic sound up north is the one that I almost never hear in New York City: the sound of nothing at all.”

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.