Tag Archive: Dr. Daniel Fink

Use SoundPrint app on International Noise Awareness Day

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Acoustical Society of America is encouraging people to observe International Noise Awareness Day on April 25 by using the SoundPrint app for smart phones to record and post restaurant noise levels.

That sounds like a good idea to me.

DISCLOSURE: I am the Medical Advisor for SoundPrint.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Dutch “singing road” drives locals nuts

Imagine the aural counterpart to this. Photo credit: Steven Lek licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Here is an amusing article about a singing road that bothered people living nearby and eventually was made to sound like a normal road.

Road traffic noise is a major contributor to noise pollution, obviously affecting those living closest to the road or highway.

Let’s hope that other cities and towns learn from the Dutch experience: people want quiet highways, not noisy ones.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

It’s not just the noise level in restaurants but the type of noise that matters

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This Denver Post article correctly makes the point that patrons don’t want a too noisy restaurant but they don’t want a too quiet one, either.

There is a fine balance between ambient noise levels that allow one to converse with your dining companions, but are loud or complex enough to mask conversations from nearby tables.

And the quality of the noise–is it sharp, tinkling, reverberating?–also makes a difference in the restaurant experience.

The article also notes that it’s hard to design the right sound environment into the restaurant and that adjustments are often needed after a restaurant opens.

DISCLOSURE: The article mentions the SoundPrint app for measuring restaurant noise. I serve as the Medical Advisor to SoundPrint.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

New study shows hope for hearing loss. Again.

Image credit: Chittka L. Brockmann licensed under CC BY 2.5

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report shows hope for hearing loss, describing a technique that may work to deliver drugs to inner ear structures deep within the skull, perhaps to treat hearing loss.

Whether these techniques will actually work, will be approved by the FDA, and will be affordable remains to be seen, probably years or even decades in the future.

In the meantime, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound–or several pounds–worth of cure.

Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Avoid loud noise and avoid hearing loss.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud. If you can’t carry on a normal conversation without straining to speak or to be heard, the ambient noise is above the auditory injury threshold of 75 A-weighted decibels, and your hearing is being damaged.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Can bananas protect against hearing loss?

Photo credit: Dom J from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Can bananas protect against hearing loss?

This report from Australia states that nutrients in bananas–zinc and potassium–can help protect hearing.

The potassium reportedly protects against hearing loss and the zinc against tinnitus.

That may be true and everyone should eat a healthy diet including at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily, but I doubt that these two nutrients by themselves will prevent auditory damage from noise exposure.

And I’m always puzzled that researchers and the public look for various cures or treatments for auditory disorders- many of questionable scientific validity or still in a very preliminary stage of development- when there is one proven effective way to protect hearing:

Avoid loud noise, or wear hearing protection if you can’t escape the noise.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Musician wins landmark case over damaged hearing

Photo credit: MITO SettembreMusica licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The BBC reports that a viola player who suffered a life-changing hearing injury at a rehearsal of a Wagner opera is entitled for compensation for his injury.

This is the first time that acoustic shock has been recognized as a compensable work-related condition.

A one-time exposure to extremely loud noise–often caused by a blast injury but possible from other loud noise–physically disrupts the structures in the inner ear. In many if not most cases, they can’t recover from the trauma.

Even if the noise isn’t 130 decibels, it can still cause lifelong hearing loss, tinnitus, or hyperacusis.

I have been unable to find more than anecdotal reports in the medical literature of this type of auditory damage, and in science the operative phrase is “the plural of anecdotes isn’t data,” but we all need to be aware of the dangers of noise.

As violist Chris Goldscheider unfortunately learned, if it sounds too loud, it is too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Hearing loss is associated with accidental injury

Photo credit: slgckgc licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This paper in the March 22, 2018, issue of JAMA Otolaryngology reports that difficulty hearing is associated with an increased risk of accidental injury. The study is preliminary because it relies on subject self-report of hearing difficulty rather than measured hearing loss, but it makes sense. Sound provides much information–for communication, for entertainment, and for warning of hazards–and if you have difficulty hearing, you’ll become aware of problems (e.g., an approaching vehicle, a power tool that’s getting stuck, or even just a shouted warning) later than if you had good hearing.

Think about all the accidental injury that could be avoided if people made an effort to protect their hearing.  After all, most hearing loss in adults is noise-induced hearing loss which is 100% preventable.

Protect your hearing by avoiding loud noise or using hearing protection, and avoid accidental injury, too.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Noisy vacuum cleaners are still a problem in the EU

Photo credit: Phonical licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Despite European Union regulations about vacuum cleaner noise, this report documents that noisy vacuum cleaners are still a problem there.

As the Volkswagen diesel pollution fiasco shows, manufacturers will flout laws meant to protect the public until regulators act.

At least Europe has laws protecting the public from appliance noise. The U.S. has these laws on the books, but they have not been enforced since the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Noise Abatement and Control was defunded during the Reagan years.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

CDC: Occupational noise exposure can raise blood pressure, cholesterol levels

Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition usually doesn’t comment on occupational noise because workers have legal protection from noise exposure under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, with noise exposure standards, required hearing protection, and compensation for hearing loss, while the public has none.

We have commented–as have many others–that the occupational noise exposure standards are set too high, but we otherwise focus on the public.

But it’s important to note that most of what we know about the dangers of noise comes from occupational studies.

This report from the Centers for Disease Control documents increased blood pressure and cholesterol levels, as well as hearing loss, in workers exposed to noise.

Many research studies, the overwhelming majority from Europe, document these non-auditory health impacts of noise in the public, too, but it’s good to see these issues finally being noticed in the U.S.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

St. Pete mulls arming cops with sound meters

Photo credit: CityofStPete licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As this report shows, urban noise–in this case from restaurants, bars, and clubs–is a problem in St. Petersburg, Florida. So much so that the city council is considering supplying police officers with sound level meters, at an estimated cost of $175,000, and establishing noise limits for various locations at various times of the day.

There are two general patterns of noise laws in the U.S.: those that require measurements of sound levels, and those that allow the enforcement authorities to make a subjective assessment of whether the noise is too loud. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. Objective measurements allow precision and avoid accusations of bias, but the accuracy of the measurement can be questioned. Also, police officers in many jurisdictions have been reported to be reluctant to use the equipment, claiming that they don’t have the proper training.

On the other hand, subjective measurements allow authorities to act if the officer thinks the sound is too loud without arguments about the accuracy of the measurements, but open municipal authorities to accusations of bias in enforcement. In general, police authorities nationwide appear to be reluctant, at best, to enforce existing noise ordinances.

We would suggest that St. Petersburg save money by using one of the highly accurate free sound measurement apps available, e.g., SoundPrint or iHEARu, both of which allow location stamping, or relatively inexpensive sound measurement apps such as Faber Acoustical’s Sound Meter 4 and similar apps. [Note: Faber requires an iPhone and not an Android to be accurate, due to manufacturer variations in hardware and software specifications for Android phones.] Better yet, city council could enact enabling legislation to deputize any citizen with an approved app to report noise violations for enforcement purposes, providing the city with efficient, effective, and free noise monitoring.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.