Tag Archive: Dr. Daniel Fink

New treatment for tinnitus gives hope

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from the University of Michigan about Susan Shore PhD’s research gives hope to tinnitus sufferers that finally an effective treatment may be on the way.

Tinnitus, ringing in the ears, is most commonly caused by noise exposure, either chronic noise exposure or a one-time exposure to loud noise.

Given the causal relationship between noise exposure and both tinnitus and hyperacusis, a collapsed tolerance to usual environmental sound, many people have both. About half of those with tinnitus have significant hearing loss.

My own tinnitus developed after a one-time exposure to loud noise, so my hearing remains good. But I wish I had known that a one-time exposure to loud noise could cause symptoms the rest of my life. That’s part of the message I’m trying to get out to the world.

The other message is that both hearing loss and tinnitus are largely preventable. And certainly noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Dr. Shore’s treatment is still in its experimental phase and no one can predict how much it will cost if and when it is approved by the FDA. Or, for that matter, if Medicare and private insurance programs will pay for it.

The most basic public health principle is that it’s far better, and far cheaper, to prevent illness or injury than to treat it. So while we wish Dr. Shore well, we hope those who do not yet have tinnitus, hyperacusis, or hearing loss take this sage–and free–advice:

Protect your ears! Avoid loud noise. Put in ear plugs if you can’t leave the noisy environment.

Remember, your ears are like your eyes or your knees: God only gave you two of them.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Australians are in danger of hearing loss

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from the National Acoustic Laboratory at Australia’s Macquarie University found that 1 in 10 Australians used personal listening devices (PLDs) at dangerously high volumes.

Not surprisingly, those who reported using the devices at high volumes also reported more difficulty hearing things.

Only the abstract is available without a subscription, so I can’t comment on details of the study, which would be stronger if actual hearing tests had been done on the subjects, but the final line of the abstract is one that I agree with entirely:

Although PLD use alone is not placing the majority of users at risk, it may be increasing the likelihood that individuals’ cumulative noise exposure will exceed safe levels.

And that’s the problem with studies focusing just on personal listening device use. They are only one small part of the total daily noise dose. Flamme, et al., found that 70% of adults in Kalamazoo County, Michigan received total daily noise doses exceeding the Environmental Protection Agency’s safe noise limit of 70 decibels time weighted average for a day. That’s why the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently reported that almost 25% of American adults had noise-induced hearing loss, many if not most without occupational exposure.

As the CDC states, noise-induced hearing loss is preventable. No noise, no hearing loss.

Protect your ears now and you won’t need hearing aids later.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

The importance of the scientific method

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The New York Times reports that officials at the Centers for Disease control were told not to use certain words, including “evidence based” and “science based.

The Quiet Coalition’s website states:

The Quiet Coalition consists of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.
We believe an evidence-based approach to noise as a health and social problem, combined with educational outreach and organized action, can lead to meaningful change.
The Quiet Coalition provides a platform for communication, programs, and coordinated action for those trying to bring current medical and scientific knowledge to the process of creating a quieter, more sustainable, and livable world.

The founders and members of The Quiet Coalition believe in scientific evidence and evidence-based policy and decision making.

We urge those in government to make decisions based on sound evidence, not on faith or dogma, and to monitor programs for results.

If something doesn’t work, stop that and try something different.

That’s the scientific method. That’s how Thomas Edison invented so many things. That’s how societies get ahead.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Information is our weapon against noise

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As this column by Jane Brody discusses, 47 years ago the Center for Science in the Public Interest started informing the public about good nutrition and also influencing public policy about food labeling and nutrition standards.

CSPI’s success has been mixed, but it clearly has had a major impact.

I didn’t realize it at the time, but when I became a noise activist three years ago–after reading this article in The New York Times science section about hyperacusis, which I have–I set out to do the same thing for noise that CSPI has done for food and nutrition.

Everything I do regarding noise is based on scientific and medical evidence. To my surprise, most of the information I have written about has been known since the early 1970s, or even earlier. It just has been forgotten since the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Noise Abatement and Control was defunded (pdf) during the Reagan years. I took me a year to learn what a safe noise level is, as I wrote in the American Journal of Public Health. [Hint: it’s not 85 decibels without time limit, as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health insists on its website, with the misleading statement “[l]ong or repeated exposure to sound at or above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss.” That’s true, but it’s like the National Cancer Institute saying, “standing out in the sun every day for a long time all summer long can cause skin cancer.”]

So let’s hope that regulators and policy makers will begin to recognize the dangers of noise exposure in the new year. I’m certainly going to do my part to bring this problem to their attention. I hope you will join me.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Local airports are a problem too

Photo credit: Addison YC licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Local airports are a problem for those who live near them.

Airports big and small–from Logan in Boston and Reagan in Washington to the airports in the Hamptons and Santa Monica–have been in the news recently for noise and air pollution problems.

And now it’s Teterboro Airport’s turn in the spotlight.

I lived under the flight path to the Santa Monica Airport from 1991-2009, so I saw (or perhaps heard) the transition from single-engine Beechcraft, Cessna, and Piper aircraft, with a rare Beechcraft King Air two-engine plane from time to time, to Gulfstream 3, 4, and 5 jets. The single-engine planes didn’t make much noise, but not so for the jets.

A few things happened simultaneously. Thanks to airline deregulation, the number of passengers flying increased dramatically, without a corresponding increase in airport capacity. Because of this, airline service quality declined. After September 11, 2001, things got much worse. The security regulations made it unpleasant and time-consuming to travel on commercial flights, even in first or business class. The rise of the multi-millionaire and billionaire classes, thanks to strong markets and federal tax policies favoring wealthy investors, meant that many more people could afford to charter small jets, purchase fractional jet ownerships, or even buy their own planes.

As F. Scott Fitzgerald is reputed to have said, “the rich are different from you and me.” Why put up with the hassles of going through airport security and waiting for the boarding announcement when your limousine can drop you off and your private jet’s crew will load your bags while your custom-ordered meals are being delivered? Of course, the costs of these luxuries aren’t just borne by the rich. Those living near the airports put up with the noise and pollution.

In Santa Monica, the community finally rose in opposition and after a lengthy legal battle, succeeded in getting the airport to cease operations in 2028. Noise and safety concerns–a Gulfstream jet produces a lot more pollution and noise than a single-engine plane, and if one ever crashes it will cause a lot more damage than a small plane–were the major issues.

I hope I live ten more years to see (and hear) this happen. And I hope that those living near other small airports are successful in their efforts to control noise and pollution problems, too.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

An interesting report on access + ability

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Access + Ability is the name of an exhibit open now at the Cooper Hewitt design museum in New York City.

This column in the New York Times discusses some of the many issues involved in designing products and increasingly apps to assist those with disabilities.

The author doesn’t mention one such app which I think will be a great help to those of us with auditory disorders–hearing loss, tinnitus, and hyperacusis–namely, Greg Scott’s free SoundPrint app, which allows measurement of sound levels in restaurants and bars and then posting this information for that specific restaurant or bar on a publicly accessible site.

I think it’s great that people with disabilities are being helped both by laws requiring modifications to make public places accessible to them, and now by new technologies. But it’s better to avoid a disability if one can. Driving safely in a safety-rated vehicle and wearing a seat belt is one way of reducing the likelihood of serious physical injury from a motor vehicle crash. Avoiding loud noise and wearing hearing protection reduces the danger of noise-induced hearing loss, the most common type of hearing loss.

Protect your ears. Like your eyes and knees, God only gave you two of them!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise is the next great public health crisis

Photo credit: Loozrboy licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coaltion

This wonderful article from Futurism.com discusses the major problem of noise pollution as the nation and the world become increasingly urbanized.

Few remember that the U.S., government policy, as voted by Congress and signed into law in 1972, is “to promote an environment for all Americans free from noise that jeopardizes their health and welfare.”

The article’s author, Neel V. Patel, cites extensively noise pioneer and The Quiet Coalition co-founder and board member Arline Bronzaft, PhD, who 45 years ago showed that environmental noise interfered with children’s learning.

As Patel writes:

It’s impossible to overstate how much noise pollution can wreak havoc on human health and safety. High noise levels can exacerbate hypertension, cause insomnia or sleep disturbances, result in hearing loss, and worsen a plethora of other medical conditions. All of these problems can aggravate other health issues by inducing higher levels of stress, which can cascade into worsened immune systems, heart problems, increased anxiety and depression — the list just goes on and on.

We at The Quiet Coalition agree.  So click the first link, read Patel’s article, and learn how the U.S. government’s active failure to regulate noise since 1981 all but guarantees that noise is the next great public health crisis.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

This new year resolve to avoid products that damage health (even when used as directed)!

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions. If something is worth doing, why wait to do it until January 1. But many people do, so here is one suggestion:

Avoid products that damage your health or the health of others when used exactly as directed.

What are these products? I can think of three: tobacco products, firearms, and earbuds or headphones using 85 decibels as a safe volume limit (without any exposure time recommended). 85 decibels isn’t a safe volume limit. It’s an occupational noise exposure standard that even with strict time limits doesn’t prevent hearing loss in all exposed workers.

If you believe in New Year’s resolutions, one of your’s should be this: I won’t use products that when used as directed damage my health or the health of others.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise sensitivity is all in your head–and this report proves it!

Photo credit: Allan Ajifo licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I developed tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and hyperacusis (a sensitivity to noise, characterized by discomfort and pain to noise levels that others don’t have a problem with) ten years ago after a one-time exposure to loud noise.

It was at a New Year’s Eve dinner in a restaurant. As midnight approached, they kept cranking the music up louder and louder. My wife could tell I was uncomfortable and suggested that we leave, but I didn’t want to offend her or the friends who had arranged the dinner.

We left as soon after midnight as we could, but my ears were ringing when we left and the ringing never stopped. And I found that sounds that didn’t bother others bothered me.

For years hyperacusis was thought to be purely psychosomatic and those with it to have some sort of psychiatric disorder. Then pain fibers were discovered in the auditory system. And now this report from Finland shows that there are differences in the brains of people with noise sensitivity.

So yes, hyperacusis is all in our heads. But it’s not as a psychiatric problem, it’s a central nervous system difference.

Science marches on!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Four in 10 UK adults unknowingly endanger their hearing on a daily basis

Photo credit: Gary J. Wood licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report states that 40% of adults in the United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales) unknowingly endanger their hearing on a daily basis.

This finding fits neatly with Dr. Gregory A. Flamme’s report that 70% of U.S. adults get total noise doses exceeding safe limits and Dr. Richard Neitzel’s similar finding in a Swedish population.

This isn’t rocket science–noise exposure for the ear is like sun exposure for the skin. If you don’t want deep wrinkles, age spots, and skin cancers when you get older, wear a hat, long sleeves, sunscreen, and avoid the sun.

If you don’t want hearing aids when you get older, avoid noise exposure.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.