Tag Archive: Dr. Daniel Fink

Noise and air pollution may be preventable causes of dementia

Photo credit: Elina Krima from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Noise and air pollution may be preventable causes of dementia. This new study from the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, reported by Med Page Today, discusses risk factors contributing to dementia. Other than rare genetic conditions, most cases of dementia have multifactorial causation. This makes prevention difficult because multiple risk factors must be addressed.

In general, a healthier lifestyle, including not smoking, eating a Mediterranean style diet, daily exercise, and other similar behaviors, have been shown to reduce or delay the onset of dementia. The new study found that risk factors contributing to dementia include hearing loss, social isolation, depression, and air pollution. These factors have now also been added to the Lancet Commission’s list of key modifiable risk factors for dementia.

Although the study doesn’t mention noise explicitly, noise causes hearing loss. Hearing loss in turn is associated, likely causally, with social isolation. People who can’t understand what others are saying tend to avoid social interaction because it’s too stressful or too embarrassing not to understand what others are saying. Social isolation in turn leads to depression.

With regard to hearing loss, researchers think the loss of auditory input caused by hearing loss also causes changes in the brain that contribute to the development of dementia. Previous studies led by researchers from Johns Hopkins have shown that hearing impairment in people 45-65 years old is related to a progressive loss of nerve cells in brain structures and reduced microstructural integrity that may indicate early Alzheimer disease.

The precise mechanisms by which air pollution contributes to dementia are unclear, but there are strong correlations between levels of pollutants and dementia. Much if not most of urban air pollution comes from particulate matter emitted by internal combustion engines. These are also a major cause of urban noise.

Reducing noise will prevent hearing loss and its consequences. And if noise from vehicles and other engines is reduced, air pollution will also be reduced.

As we have been saying for some years now, a quieter world will be a healthier world for all.

And, one hopes, it will also be a world with less dementia.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

A natural experiment on home field advantage

Photo credit: Robert Britt licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I have written about “experiments of nature” or “natural experiments” before. These events occur when something happens to set up an experimental situation that scientists would never be able to accomplish in other situations. The return of professional sports may provide such an experiment of nature.

Statistical analysis shows that there is a home field or home court advantage in baseball, football, and basketball. In major league baseball, during the 2018 season the home teams won 52.6% of games. This ratio of 53% wins at home and 47% wins on the road has held steady since 1945 according to Baseball Reference.

In professional football, from 1993 to 2012, home teams won just under 60% of games. Lineups.com reports that the home team wins by an average 3 point margin, 55-60% of the time.

In professional basketball, during the 2018-2019 season, home teams won an astounding 71 % of games. The average from 1998-2008 was 60.6% according to BleacherReport.com.

One of the factors thought to play a role in the home field advantage is crowd noise. The home crowd’s noise encourages the home team, and when the crowd makes noise to annoy a batter or interfere with the visiting football team hearing the quarterback signal calling, that has an impact too.

But as professional sports resume play without any fans in the stadium or arena, there is no home crowd to make noise.

The NBA season is being played in Disney World for now, so that’s a different sort of natural experiment. But baseball and football will be played in the usual venues.

At the end of the different sports’ seasons, we might be able to gain some insight into whether it’s crowd noise or something else that provides the home field advantage.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Dementia isn’t inevitable, and neither is hearing loss

Photo credit: Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This new study from the Alzheimer’s Cohorts Consortium, published on an open access basis in the medical journal Neurology, reports that dementia rates appear to be on the decline in Europe and North America. Analyzing results from seven different research studies, the Consortium found that the incidence of dementia declined 13% per decade in the last 40 years, with a confidence interval of 7-19% per decade. The decline was more pronounced in men than in women.

It is difficult to find the cause for the decline, but the researchers think it is due to a focus on treating cardiovascular risk factors, including reductions in smoking, better blood pressure control, and the use of antithrombotic medication. The article states, “[w]hile none of these has been specifically intended to halt cognitive decline, decades of cardiovascular risk management have likely had substantial effects on brain health, supported by reduction of small-vessel disease on brain imaging in more recent years.“

Why am I writing about a decline in dementia in a blog about noise issues?

Is it because research shows that hearing loss is a possible contributing factor to the development of dementia? No, although that statement is accurate.

The reason is that dementia used to be thought of as an inevitable part of aging, but that’s not true. Many cases of dementia have a vascular cause, and can be prevented by treating cardiovascular risk factors.

Similarly, hearing loss is thought to be part of normal aging, as shown by the use of the terms “age-related hearing loss” and “presbycusis”.

I presented a paper at the 12th Congress of the International Commission on the Biological Effects of Noise in Zurich in 2017, reviewing literature that showed that hearing loss was not an inevitable part of aging but largely represented noise-induced hearing loss. A recent research paper from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary confirms that conclusion using ear tissue from post-mortem specimens.

I’ve said this before, but it bears repeating: If a noise sounds too loud, it is too loud.

If you protect your hearing–by avoiding loud noise and using hearing protection when you can’t–you should be able to hear well when you get old. And maybe you’ll reduce your chance of developing dementia, too.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Does coronavirus affect the auditory system?

This image is in the public domain

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Does coronavirus affect the auditory system and the vestibular system that regulates balance? Two recent articles suggest that it might. The research is very preliminary and based on small numbers of subjects, so the results must be interpreted with extreme caution.

The only problem may be that the treatments for coronavirus may also cause auditory damage, especially certain antibiotics with known auditory nerve toxicity, and also unproven therapies like hydroxychloroquine.

The best way to avoid having your auditory system affected by coronavirus is to avoid getting sick.

Follow the recommendations of public health experts, shown to be effective in European and Asian countries: wear a mask, maintain social distance, avoid large crowds and indoor spaces if possible, don’t touch your face, and wash your hands frequently.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Paris takes on bikers’ noise

Photo credit: Carlos ZGZ has dedicated this photo to the public domain

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As we have written about several times, one unexpected result of the COVID-19 lockdowns worldwide was a reduction in noise–in cities, in the water, even in terms of measured seismic activity. As life has started to return to something approaching normal, noise levels are increasing.

In Paris, one cause of increased noise is motorcycles with altered exhausts. As this BBC report shows, one motorcycle riding through Paris at night can disturb the sleep of thousands of people.

In response, the police are enforcing motorcycle quiet laws, and the city is developing an automated noise monitoring system.

Maybe other cities around the world can do the same?

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Sometimes we need to put up with noise

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Sometimes people have to put up with noise. This fun piece from the Atlas Obscura folks describes a noisy rooster on the French vacation island of Ile d’Oléron. Summer visitors filed a noise complaint with the local authorities, who ruled in the rooster’s favor.

Corrine Dessau, the rooster’s owner, commented that “[t]here’s always been noise in the countryside: frogs, tractors, and, yes, roosters. When you’re in the countryside, you accept the noises of the countryside. And when you’re in the city, you accept the noises of the city. If you don’t like the noise where you are, don’t stay there.”

I would disagree about urban noise. Much if not most of urban noise can be quieted.

But in the countryside, a rooster’s wake up call is part of the charm, and visitors should get used to it.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Beluga whales sing better in a quiet ocean

Photo credit: Diliff licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I first saw beluga whales in the aquarium in Vancouver, Canada, and then last year in the wild in Canadian arctic waters. They are marvelous creatures, with a bulbous head that helps them vocalize and hear the vocalizations of other belugas.

A National Geographic television show discusses research showing that belugas sing better in quieter oceans.

For belugas, noise from ship motors is like ambient noise in a too-noisy restaurant. It makes conversation difficult.

Quiet is better for both animals and people.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Leaf blowers used to disperse tear gas in Portland

Photo credit: Browning031 has dedicated this photo to the public domain

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in Truthout reports that members of the PDX Dad Pod are using leaf blowers to disperse tear gas fired by unidentified alleged federal agents in Portland, Oregon. PDX is the three-letter airport code for Portland.

Sounds like the PDX Dad Pod found the best and highest use for leaf blowers!

I hope the Portland dads are using safe, quiet, easy to use battery-powered leaf blowers, which are now available online and in the big box, do-it-yourself stores, too. And I hope they are handing out ear plugs, too!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Age-related hearing loss is almost certainly noise induced

Photo credit: Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Hearing loss in old age is often called age-related hearing loss or presbycusis. This implies that hearing loss is part of normal aging, just like the need for bifocals called presbyopia. This article in the Society for Neuroscience’s journal reports that what is commonly called age-related hearing loss is really hair cell loss, indicative of auditory damage caused by noise

That was my conclusion based on a literature review, presented at the 12th Congress of the International Commission on the Biological Effects of Noise in Zurich in 2017.

Another recent report, this time in The Conversation, discusses research in fruit flies that may shed light on what the author calls age-related hearing loss. I don’t know how much noise fruit flies are exposed to–laboratory facilities are not quiet–but I suspect that the effects of whatever molecular changes occur in human ears with aging are compounded by cumulative noise exposure over one’s lifetime

Our ears are like our eye and our knees–we only have two of each. We don’t stare into the sun. We wear sunglasses when outdoors in bright light. In fact, sun exposure causes cataracts. We try not to injure our knees, although these can be surgically replaced.

And we need to protect our ears so they last us a lifetime.

Avoiding noise-induced hearing loss is simple: avoid exposure to loud noise, and if one can’t avoid that, use hearing protection.

Because if a noise sounds too loud, it is too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Headphone use causes hearing loss

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from the Sydney Morning Herald discusses headphone use causing hearing loss. It uses a term I hadn’t heard before–“headphone culture”–to describe the ubiquitous use of personal audio systems to provide a continuous soundtrack for daily life. There is mounting evidence that noise exposure in everyday life is loud enough to cause hearing loss in a majority of urban dwellers, and that exposure is exacerbated by using headphones or earbuds to listen to music or podcasts for hours a day.

The only quibble I have with the article is that it cites the occupational noise exposure levels of 80 or 85 decibels as being the safe sound threshold. This just isn’t true. Noise exposure levels that don’t even protect all exposed workers from noise-induced hearing loss certainly aren’t safe for the public!

The problem with listening to a personal audio device using headphones or earbuds is that to overcome ambient noise so one can hear what one is listening to, as when walking down the street or riding a bus or subway to work, the volume has to be turned up to dangerously loud levels.

For parents, the problem with children using headphones so they can listen to music or watch a video without disturbing others is that the parents can’t monitor the sound level or what their children are listening to.

The article discusses safer headphones with a volume limit, but my conclusion is that listening to music or podcasts or audiobooks using headphones or earbuds is as bad for the ears as smoking is for the lungs and heart.

Most volume limiting headphones use the occupational 85 decibel recommended exposure level as the volume limit and that simply won’t prevent hearing loss.

There is no safe cigarette, and headphones or earbuds with a volume limit may be safer than those without a volume limit, but they are certainly not safe.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.