Tag Archive: Dr. Daniel Fink

Nick Foles may have won Most Valuable Player at the Super Bowl last week

Photo credit: Matthew Straubmuller licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

But his daughter stole the Super Bowl limelight in this wonderful picture.

So what does Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Nick Foles know about protecting his daughter’s ears that most parents and most pediatricians don’t know?

He knows that noise is bad for children’s ears, causing auditory damage including hearing loss.

Football stadiums are among the noisiest places in the U.S., with the noise record exceeding allowable occupational exposure levels, so Nick Foles absolutely did the right thing.

We hope all parents will follow his example.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Loud music can damage classical musicians’ hearing, too

Photo credit: Derek Gleeson licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

When we think of music damaging the ears, we think of rock musicians, many of whom unfortunately have noise-induced hearing loss or tinnitus, or of young people going to clubs or rock concerts. We don’t think of classical musicians.

But loud noise doesn’t discriminate–it can damage anyone’s ears, including workers, hunters, and yes, even a professional viola player.

These two reports describe an ongoing legal case in London, where a viola player has sued the Royal Opera House for damage he claims occurred during a Wagner performance, despite wearing ear plugs.

The Royal Opera House is claiming that such damage isn’t possible, and that it isn’t responsible, but I would disagree. It’s hard to study the effects of intermittent or impulsive noise exposure even in the occupational setting, but several facts are well-established:

  1. extremely loud sound can cause mechanical disruption to structures in the inner ear;
  2. there are marked variations in individual sensitivities to noise damage, which are not well understood; and
  3. many people do not get sufficient protection from ear plugs due to poor fit or improper use, even with instruction and practice.

The resolution of this case is not up to us but within the purview of the court.

But the lesson we can all learn is that “if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.”

And if noise is bothersome, that’s the signal to leave immediately, before your ears are damaged. After all, unlike knees or hips, they can’t be replaced.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

It’s Tinnitus Awareness Week

Photo credit: Frmir licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As described on this link, it’s Tinnitus Awareness Week from February 5-11, 2018.

Tinnitus is commonly called ringing in the ears, although technically it is the perception of sound when there is no external sound source. Noise exposure–either chronic or a one-time exposure to loud noise–is the most common cause of tinnitus, although there are many other causes.

The American Tinnitus Association has lots of information available on its website. I serve on ATA’s board and have tinnitus myself.

If you have tinnitus, the most important things to know are that help is available–check the ATA website–and that you should protect your ears from noise to keep your tinnitus from getting worse.

And if you don’t have tinnitus, protect your ears from noise so you don’t ever develop it.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Don’t believe everything you read on the internet

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Many health experts and health educators warn the public not to believe everything they read on the internet unless it comes from a reliable source, e.g., the Centers for Disease Control, the American Heart Association, etc. Even then, respected agencies make mistakes. The National Institute for Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, for examples, still states, “[l]ong or repeated exposure to sound at or above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss,” without time limit for exposure, but the 85 decibel limit is actually from the occupational standard and doesn’t protect all workers from hearing loss. It is not a safe noise level for the public. The only evidence-based safe noise limit to prevent hearing loss is a time-weighted average of 70 decibels for 24 hours.

That said, one must be especially careful about information from the alternative health literature. A lot of claims are made that are just not supported by science. This report from the Alternative Daily is one of them. The headline states that six nutrients are scientifically proven to boost hearing, which implies that taking these nutrients will improve hearing. But the studies cited merely are correlation or association studies, showing, for example, that people with hearing loss had lower folate levels. This does not demonstrate that insufficient folate intake causes hearing loss. This certainly doesn’t show that taking supplemental folate, or eating a healthier diet with foods containing folate, will improve hearing.

There are many different causes of hearing loss–ototoxic drugs, ear infections, trauma–and associations with chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes and bad health habits such as smoking or poor quality diet, but noise is the most common cause of hearing loss.

So what’s the sensible way to protect yourself and your family from hearing loss and other hearing injuries?  The answer is revealed by this one fact: noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.  So throw away the pills and miracle cures and avoid loud noise to protect your hearing.

Remember: if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

New Yorker writer worries about her ears–you should be worried, too

Photo credit: Scott Robinson licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

New Yorker staff writer Amanda Petrusich is worried about what noise is doing to her ears.

She’s right to be worried. We all should be worried.

As the world has gotten louder–perhaps because “everyone knows” that 85 decibels is safe because the National Institute for Deafness and Other Communication Disorders tells us “long or repeated exposure to sound at or above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss”–a vast uncontrolled experiment is taking place in the U.S., with 320 million subjects.

Gregory Flamme and colleagues showed that 70% of adults in Kalamazoo County, Michigan got total daily noise doses exceeding Environmental Protection safe noise levels for preventing hearing loss.

Not surprisingly, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control reported a year ago that 25% of American adults have noise-induced hearing loss, including many people without any occupational noise exposure.

Remember, if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud! If you can’t carry on a normal conversation without straining to speak or to be heard, the ambient noise is above 75 A-weighted decibels, which also happens to be the auditory injury threshold.

Your ears are like your eyes or your knees. You only have two of them. Keep them away from loud noise and they should last you your entire life.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise problems inside and outside the Super Bowl

Photo credit: Darb02 licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

We have run several pieces about noise inside football stadiums, but this is the first I’ve written about noise problems outside the football stadium.

It turns out that Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Airports Commission has warned the public that extra flights to regional airports will cause noise before and after the Super Bowl.

At least that noise is only temporary, while it may disrupt sleep and other activities for those living near regional airports or under flight paths, it shouldn’t cause permanent hearing damage, unlike the noise inside the stadium.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Another promising lead for repairing hearing loss

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article reports yet another promising lead for repairing hearing loss from research done at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Sea anemones can repair hair cells on their tentacles that respond to vibration. Fish have similar hair cells on their scales that help them respond to currents in the water as well as to detect prey and avoid predators. Researcher Glen Watson, PhD, found that a protein made by sea anemones helped repair damaged hair cells, first in experiments done in fish and then in hair cells from mice. The hope is that this protein can eventually be used to help repair hair cells in humans.

This is another interesting development with potential to eventually lead to a treatment for hearing loss. But shouldn’t we focus on the cause of hearing loss, too? We already know that noise damages hair cells, leading to hearing loss, and it’s a whole lot easier and cheaper to prevent noise-induced hearing loss by avoiding loud noise exposure or protecting one’s ears if exposure cannot be avoided.

So while it is exciting to see that researchers are getting closer to finding a treatment for hearing loss, let’s not ignore a fact that requires no additional research:

Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Remember: your ears are like your eyes or your knees. God only gave you two of them. Protect them well, because you need them to last a whole lifetime!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

How likely are you to get tinnitus from clubbing?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article from the UK asks the question: How likely are you to get tinnitus from clubbing?

The article points out that there really isn’t any way to predict who will develop tinnitus, i.e., ringing in the ears, after noise exposure, and that’s the most important thing to know.

I didn’t know that a one-time exposure to loud noise could cause tinnitus the rest of one’s life. I developed tinnitus (and hyperacusis, a sensitivity to noise that doesn’t bother others, with noise causing pain in the ear) after a one-time exposure to loud music in a restaurant on New Year’s Eve ten years ago.

Fortunately, there is one simple rule to protect your ears: if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

If you can’t carry on a conversation without straining to speak or to hear, the ambient noise is above the auditory injury threshold of 75 A-weighted decibels, and your hearing is being damaged.

Research done over the last decade strongly suggests that there is no temporary auditory damage. In animal models, loud noise damages the synapses (nerve junctions) in the ear before it damages the hair cells. This damage isn’t detected by standard hearing tests (pure tone audiometry) but likely is the major reason why adults have difficulty following one conversation among many in a noisy environment.

Remember, your ears are like your eyes or your knees–God only gave you two of them! Take care of them, and they will last you your whole life.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Gene therapy is great, but can anyone afford it?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Science holds great promise for treatments and cures. Among the areas of research in treating or curing hearing loss or even total deafness is gene therapy. Scientists at Columbia University and Stanford University and elsewhere are already working on this.

The main concern I have about gene therapy is its cost. A new treatment for a rare form of blindness costs $850,000. A recently approved gene therapy for a rare form of leukemia costs $500,000.

No one can predict how much a gene therapy treatment for hearing loss or deafness will cost, but the ballpark is several hundred thousand dollars. For a condition affecting 50 million Americans, that’s more than our country can afford. Insurance premiums would have to increase ten or one hundred times if health insurance or pharmacy benefits paid for the drug, or there would be prohibitive cost sharing. Out of pocket costs would be more than anyone except a few multimillionaires or billionaires could afford.

And the sad part is that the overwhelming majority of hearing loss in adults–I estimate up to 90% of all cases of adult hearing loss–is noise-induced hearing loss, which is 100% preventable.

My advice: avoid loud noise. If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud. Protect your ears. Like your eyes and knees, God only gave you two of them, and they have to last a whole lifetime!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Ringing ears is a sign of permanent damage to hearing

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article from the Cleveland Clinic makes the point that ringing in the ears–the technical term is tinnitus–after loud noise exposure indicates that permanent damage has occurred to the ears.

That’s good to know. I didn’t know that before a one-time exposure to loud noise ten years ago caused tinnitus for the rest of my life.

But I disagree strongly with two things Sharon A. Sandridge, PhD, Director of Clinical Services in Audiology at the Cleveland Clinic, says in the online article.

One is her statement, “[a]s you get older, it’s natural to experience some hearing loss.”

No, it’s not natural to experience hearing loss with age. Hearing loss with age is very common, but it is not part of normal healthy aging, representing largely noise-induced hearing loss. I spoke about this last year at the 12th Congress of the International Commission on the Biological Effects of Noise in Zurich.

Dr. Sandridge’s second erroneous statement, with much more serious implications, is “[a] majority of people are safe listening to 85 dB for eight hours.”

This is just wrong! The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) doesn’t think so and neither do I.

Eighty-five decibels–actually 85 A-weighted decibels (dBA) which usually measure 5-7 decibels lower than unweighted sound measurements–is the occupational noise exposure standard from NIOSH that even with strict time limits doesn’t protect all exposed workers from hearing loss.

The mathematics of the logarithmic decibel scale mean that after 2 hours of 85 dBA noise exposure, it is impossible to attain the only evidence-based safe noise level to prevent hearing loss, 70 decibels time-weighted average for 24 hours.

Most Americans are exposed to too much noise. Because of that, about 25% of American adults have noise-induced hearing loss, including many without any occupational exposure.

We’re running a great natural experiment–does noise exposure cause hearing loss?–and the answer is obviously “yes”.

And statements like those of “experts” like Dr. Sandridge, minimizing the health risks of noise exposure, are unfortunately part of the problem.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.