Tag Archive: Dr. Daniel Fink

“Baby Driver” highlights the problems of tinnitus

Photo credit: leadfoot licensed under CC BY 2.0

Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I am not a moviegoer although my wife would say I am a movie critic, but I can’t comment on the new movie “Baby Driver” because I haven’t seen it. What I can say, based on movie reviews and this online article, is that the lead character has tinnitus from head trauma in a motor vehicle crash, and he plays music constantly to mask it.

Although there are many causes of tinnitus, the most common cause is noise, with a strong correlation between noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus. Most people with tinnitus have at least some hearing loss, and half of people with hearing loss have tinnitus.

So, movie conventions aside, what’s the best way to avoid developing tinnitus? It’s simple–avoid loud noise and wear hearing protection if you can’t.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Hearing Restoration: A Step Closer?

Photo credit: Ronna Hertzano et al. licensed under CC BY 2.5

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

A recent report that scientists in Boston have caused human hair cells to regrow in the laboratory is exciting news, holding out the promise of hearing restoration in the future.

But it is important to remember two facts:

1. Development and then approval of this technology for human use are likely to be years if not decades in the future, and the technology will most likely be very expensive.

2. Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable and prevention is either free or inexpensive: avoid loud noise exposure and use hearing protection (ear plugs or ear muffs) if one can’t.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Is eating out bad for your ears?

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

We all know from personal experience that restaurants are too loud. In this piece in The Washington Post, Gail Richard, the president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, writes that noise levels in restaurants are loud enough to damage one’s hearing. Specifically, Richard states that “[c]onsistently listening to noise levels above 70 decibels can cause hearing loss over time,” noting that “it is not unusual for restaurant reviewers who regularly list restaurant noise in their reviews to find levels above 70 and even 80 decibels.”

The Quiet Coalition has covered a number of reports about restaurant noise so this information is nothing new, but this opinion piece is a nice summary.

The only thing I disagree with is Richard’s suggestion that restaurants could provide quiet zones for customers with hearing loss or those who prefer less noisy spaces. The idea of “separate but equal” spaces embodied in quiet zones, quiet rooms, or even a request for a quiet table runs counter to the legal requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which requires that places of public accommodation offer those with disabilities full and equal enjoyment. Someone with complete hearing loss in one ear would appear to meet the ADA definition of having a disability.

Simply put, we shouldn’t have to ask for a quiet table or a quiet room. All restaurants should be quiet enough to allow all customers to converse.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Why do humans suffer hearing loss from noise?

Image is in the public domain in the U.S.

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Why do humans suffer hearing loss from noise? The cellular, sub-cellular, and even molecular reasons for how noise damages the auditory system are known, but why?

In a fascinating article in The Hearing Journal, evolutionary biologist William Shofner, PhD, notes that humans and our animal forebears evolved in a largely quiet environment. Exquisitely acute hearing was important for finding prey or avoiding threats, but resistance to noise damage in the auditory system conferred no selective advantage.

Our world only started getting noisy as cities evolved, and especially since the Industrial Revolution. That is, our ears haven’t evolved to handle the noise, hence the epidemic of noise-induced hearing loss reported by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Shofner’s last paragraph says it all:

Why didn’t evolution make the ear more noise-resistant? Again, evolution does not proceed with purpose. Simply stated, the human ear did not evolve under conditions of high sound levels. Any genetic mutation that might have led to a noise-resistant ear was likely not selected because it did not provide any benefit for survival and reproductive success in the pre-historic acoustic environment of early mammals. Natural selection is an exceedingly slow process that occurs over many generations, and the susceptibility of the human ear to noise-induced damage shows how natural selection is unable to keep up with rapid changes in an organism’s environment (Evol Applications. 2008). Technology has produced an acoustic environment that has changed much faster than the sluggish pace of human evolution. This evolutionary explanation of why the human ear is so susceptible to damage at highly intense noise levels provides a valuable perspective that audiologists can offer patients to prevent NIHL.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

New explanation for why older people can’t hear in noisy environments

Photo credit: Filipe Fortes licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

There are already several explanations about why middle-aged and older people can’t understand speech in noisy environments. One may just be high-frequency hearing loss caused by noise, which makes it hard to hear the higher-pitched consonant sounds (F, S, SH, T, V) that allow us to differentiate similar sounding words (Fear, Sear, Shear, Tear, Veer). (See the graph in this CDC Vital Signs Issue.) Another reason may be a phenomenon called “hidden hearing loss,” which is caused by noise damage to nerve junctions (synapses) in the inner ear.

And now a new report indicates that there may also be a brain or central processing problem. A study conducted at the Max Planck Institute in Germany, “analyzed what happens in the brain when older adults have trouble listening in loud environments.”  The researchers “monitored the brains of 20 younger adults ages 18 to 31, and 20 older adults in their 60s and 70s, during a listening task” in which constant background noise was played while participants were told to focus on certain targeted sounds.

What the researchers found was that “the younger adults were able to zero in on the target signals while filtering out the irrelevant noise,” but the older participants had “a harder time tuning out the background noise.” What remained unclear was whether the “degradation of the ear’s ability to hear actually leads to a decline in the brain’s ability to filter out noise and hear a single sound,” or whether “the brain’s listening ability erodes independently of any changes going on in the ear.”

As for why older people have a difficult time understanding speech in noisy environments, it most likely is that all three factors occur to varying degrees in various individuals. But one thing is certain, preventing hearing loss is simple: avoid loud noise. And improving the ability of people young and old to follow conversations is also simple: turn down the volume in indoor places.

Link via the UK Noise Association.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Can noise cause fertility problems?

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

A report in the New Scientist indicates the answer is “maybe.” Researchers in Denmark conducted a study that found an exposure-response relationship between noise and difficulty getting pregnant. The researchers made their discovery by analysing data from the Danish National Birth Cohort, a project that ran from 1996 to 2002, and focusing on women who had tried to get pregnant during the project “if traffic noise data was available for where they lived.” The study was controlled for factors like poverty levels and nitrogen oxide pollution.

Earlier research had suggested that 80% of women who were actively trying to get pregnant usually did so within six menstrual cycles, but the research team found that “for every 10 decibels of extra traffic noise around a woman’s home, there was a 5 to 8 per cent increased chance of it taking six months or longer.”  The article notes that it “is unclear whether traffic noise may be affecting women or their partners.”

New Scientist quotes Rachel Smith of Imperial College London, who finds the link between traffic noise and health worrying. Says Smith, “[b]ecause traffic noise is common, even a small effect on health could feasibly have a large impact across a population.”

Just as the Danish study was released, a South Korean study was reported that focused on long-term exposure to a noisy environment and male infertility.  The study by researchers at Seoul National University, which ran for eight years from 2006-2013, looked “at male infertility by analyzing data from 206,492 men aged 20-59 and calculating the participants’ levels of noise exposure.”  3,293 of the participants had an infertility diagnosis.

The researchers “found that, after taking into account factors such as age, income, BMI and smoking, men who were exposed to noise over 55 dB at night (a level equivalent to a suburban street or an air conditioner and above the World Health Organization night noise level) had a significantly higher chance of being diagnosed as infertile.”  Dr. Jin-Young Min, the study’s co-author, noted that infertility was becoming a significant public health issue, adding that it was known noise affected male fertility in animals, but his study was the first to show the risk of environmental noise on male infertility in humans.

Both studies’ findings have to be replicated in other countries and by other researchers, but the data keep mounting and show that environmental noise pollution is a ubiquitous, pervasive, and dangerous health problem.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Revisiting the routine audiological test

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

An audiology examination involves examination of the ear to inspect the ear drum, and then tests based on the patient’s complaints. Routine audiology testing includes pure tone audiometry, i.e., can the patient hear sound at different standard frequencies at different volumes? The recording of these responses is graphed into an audiogram:

Image credit: Courtesy of Dr. Stephane Maison

Tests of speech comprehension can also be performed.  But more detailed tests, such as DPOAE (Distortion Product Oto-Acoustic Emissions), and BAER (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Responses) are not routinely done. They are reserved to further investigate suspected problems, or used as research techniques.

But none of these tests can detect the phenomenon of “hidden hearing loss,” a synaptopathy caused by noise damage to slow response nerves and nerve junctions in the cochlea.

Dr. Stephane Maison, a leading researcher at Harvard Medical School and the Eaton-Peabody laboratory at the Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, recently published two important papers. The first, Toward a Differential Diagnosis of Hidden Hearing Loss, documented hearing loss in young musicians that was not detected by standard pure-tone audiometry but was detected by more sophisticated tests. In his paper, Dr. Maison wrote that his study “aimed to test the hypothesis that ‘hidden hearing loss’ is widespread among young adults with normal audiometric thresholds, especially those who abuse their ears regularly.” To test this theory, they “recruited young adult subjects and divided them according to noise-exposure history into high-risk and low-risk groups.” What he and his team found were “significant deficits in difficult word-recognition tasks in the high-risk group that were associated with significant elevation of pure-tone thresholds at frequencies higher than those normally tested and with changes in auditory evoked potentials consistent with the presence of cochlear synaptopathy, also known as hidden hearing loss.”

In the second paper in The Hearing Journal, he recommends that additional tests should be added to the current audiometry protocol to detect hidden hearing loss. Dr. Maison argues that early detection must be done since “[n]oise damage early in life likely accelerates the age-related further loss of hair cells and cochlear neurons, even in the absence of further ear abuse,” and suggests that additional tests be administered to identify hidden hearing loss, noting that “recent animal research has reported regeneration of cochlear nerve synaptic connections with inner hair cells after noise exposure.” He concludes that “[c]larification of the true risks of noise, and the true prevalence of noise-induced damage, are important to public policy on noise abatement, to raising general consciousness about the dangers of ear abuse and to preventing a dramatic rise in hearing impairment in the future.”

Click the links above to read Dr. Maison’s papers. They are well worth your time.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Gene may hold key to hearing recovery

Photo credit: Max Pixel licensed under CC0 1.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

A recent discovery may explain why noise exposure makes some deaf but not others. Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center found that a gene with a possible role in human longevity may also play a role in protecting outer hair cells in the cochlea from damage by noise.

Noise-induced hearing loss is the most common cause of hearing loss. Approximately one-third of Americans reaching retirement age have hearing loss, but two-thirds do not. Little is understood about why noise damages hearing in some people but not in others, and this gene may explain part of this puzzle.

Of course, while scientists are trying to figure this out, we can all avoid noise-induced hearing loss entirely simply by avoiding exposure to loud noise, or wearing ear plugs if we can’t. The only evidence-based safe noise level to avoid hearing loss remains a time-weighted average of 70 decibels a day, as I wrote about in the American Journal of Public Health earlier this year.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr. Fink is a graduate of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Millions of people don’t protect their ears

Photo credit: Quinn Dombrowski licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

By Daniel Fink, MD

Noise is a medical and public health problem, and yet people ignore it at their own peril. Most of us are exposed to too much noise every day. That may explain why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 25% of adults age 20-69 had hearing loss, and that many people with hearing loss didn’t know they had it.

Which is why a recent article by Mark Fischetti in Scientific American,A Loud Warning: Millions of People Do Not Protect Their Ears,” is particularly disturbing. Fischetti reports that while “many people know that they should use earplugs or earmuffs when mowing the lawn or partying at the club,” they don’t protect their ears against noise at home or at work. If you click the link to the article, you’ll see a frightening infographic that very clearly shows that millions of Americans are at risk of losing their hearing or suffering other hearing damage because they fail to protect their ears.

Maybe if people knew that noise caused hearing loss, tinnitus, and hyperacusis–none of which can be cured–they might be motivated to protect their hearing and fight for quiet.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area.  He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Who should get their hearing checked? Everyone!

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This local television anchor recommends that everyone get his or her hearing checked.

But this isn’t what the experts at the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend. They reviewed the published medical literature on screening for hearing loss and concluded that, based on the literature, there is no proven benefit to screening for hearing loss in adults. People who complain of not being able to hear should be checked, they cautioned, but they found no benefit in looking for hearing loss is those who don’t have an obvious problem.

Maybe it’s time to rethink that recommendation. A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Vital Signs: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Adults, found the following based on recent data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey:

Results: Nearly one in four adults (24%) had audiometric notches, suggesting a high prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss. The prevalence of notches was higher among males. Almost one in four U.S. adults who reported excellent or good hearing had audiometric notches (5.5% bilateral and 18.0% unilateral). Among participants who reported exposure to loud noise at work, almost one third had a notch.

Conclusions and Implications for Public Health Practice: Noise-induced hearing loss is a signficant, often unrecognized health problem among U.S. adults. Discussions between patients and personal health care providers about hearing loss symptoms, tests, and ways to protect hearing might help with early diagnosis of hearing loss and provide opportunities to prevent harmful noise exposures. Avoiding prolonged exposure to loud environments and using personal hearing protection devices can prevent noise-induced hearing loss.

Audiometric notch is the hallmark of noise induced hearing loss.

The CDC information that a quarter of American adults have hearing loss but don’t know it–including those who rate their hearing as good or excellent–indicates a major problem. Experts recommend checking blood pressure at every doctor visit and cholesterol at varying intervals, depending on risk factors, beginning in childhood. Screening for auditory disorders is recommended for children but not for adults. But hearing loss is like high blood pressure or high cholesterol–it is painless and asymptomatic, and unless someone checks, the patient doesn’t know that he or she has it.

Why does this matter? Most Americans, including most doctors and audiologists, don’t know that the only safe noise exposure level to prevent hearing loss is only 70 decibels time weighted average for 24 hours with the real safe noise exposure level probably even lower than that. Most Americans don’t know that we are exposed to dangerous levels of noise every day, which probably explains the recent CDC findings. If people know that they have hearing loss, perhaps they will do more to protect their ears.

Significant hearing loss with age is probably not part of normal physiological aging, but represents noise-induced hearing loss. (I will be presenting a paper on that topic at the 12th Congress of the International Commission on the Biological Effects of Noise.)  Regular hearing testing could prevent current and future generations from losing their hearing.  Why? Because noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable, and regular tests would let people know whether and to what degree their hearing is compromised, allowing–and encouraging–them to take action today to avoid significant hearing loss tomorrow.¹

Take the initiative with regard to your hearing health, and have your hearing tested regularly as part of a preventive health plan.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area.  He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

¹ For those who are concerned about establishing the diagnosis of hearing loss as a pre-existing condition which might increase their insurance rates or exclude coverage for future hearing health care, they should not be worried for two reasons: (1) Medicare and Medicaid don’t have a pre-existing condition exclusion, and (2) federal and commercial insurance plans do not cover audiology services and hearing aids. Which is more important? Not establishing a pre-existing condition for something not covered by insurance, or finding out that your hearing is already being damaged and having the chance to take steps to protect your ears?