Tag Archive: electric cars

What kind of sound should electric cars make to warn pedestrians?

Photo credit: Mike from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This interesting article in The New York Times discusses carmakers’ efforts to choose the sound their electric cars will make. Electric motors are quieter than internal combustion motors, and regulations in Europe and the U.S. require–or will require–electric and hybrid powered vehicles to make sounds that warn pedestrians of their approach, especially the visually impaired.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data show that hybrid electric vehicles were 35% more likely than standard cars to be involved in a pedestrian accident, and 57% more likely to be involved in an accident with a bicycle. Personally, I think the problem may be greater for distracted pedestrians who are talking or texting on their phones than it is for the visually impaired.

If vehicles can be required to make sound, they can also be required to be quieter. So the principle of regulations about vehicle noise would appear to be without controversy. And the same principle needs to be extended to vehicles, such as the muscle cars and Harley-Davidson motorcycles also mentioned in the article, that make too much noise.

Actually, there are existing federal regulations and regulations in many states about vehicle noise, but these are rarely if ever enforced—and that needs to change.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

On adding sound to electric cars: a modest proposal

Rod Liddle, The Spectator, puts a poison pen to paper in a plea to the powers that be, pleading that electric cars be kept quiet even if they hit a few pedestrians.

While we understand Liddle’s dislike of unnecessary noise, his proposal is a bit harsh, though to his credit he doesn’t carve out an exception for himself as he writes:

[S]crap the noise-making device idea and let the pedestrians die. I am one of them and am fully prepared to take that risk. Let them die.

 

 

 

U.S. ends “noiseless” electric cars

U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has finalized rules regarding electric vehicles requiring that “any four-wheeled vehicle with a GVWR of less than 10,000 pounds must emit a pedestrian-warning noise at speeds below 18.6 miles per hour.”

So what will the pedestrian-warning sound like? It’s not been determined yet, writes Steph Willems, Hybriedcars.com, noting that people who have driven an electric vehicle with a pedestrian-warning noise find it “can be unsettling, even unpleasant.” Willems adds that the NHTSA hasn’t yet decided whether to give drivers a choice of sounds, though “automakers hope to have owners select from a list of regulator-approved warning tones.”

Let’s hope that someone with some taste and sense is involved in the decision-making, because the consequences of allowing brand managers and marketers to make that decision is, at best, horrifying.

Dear god, no!

It will be like this, but horrible | Photo credit: Cliff licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Noise Curmudgeon alerts us to the horribly misguided marketing idea–because it must be the marketing department that’s behind this–that is the Nissan Canto. You see, electric cars tend to be quiet, so some sound must be engineered so that they can be heard by blind people listening for aural clues, other pedestrians, animals, etc.  Rather than engineering a traditional car engine sound for the Canto, Nissan has decided to be clever and will torment us with a “singing car.”  And by singing they mean making a variable high pitched annoying drone that will drive poeple mad.

Hear it for yourself:

Oh, that’s not so bad, you may be thinking. Then imagine a street filled with “singing” cars.

My god.

Electric cars must make noise after September 2019:

car-bmw

“Quiet Car” rule will require all electric vehicles to make noise, so pedestrians can better hear and avoid them.  CNET.com reports on the long-awaited National Highway Traffic Safety Administration rule requiring auto manufacturers to add waterproof, temperature resistant sound generators to hybrid and electric vehicles sold after September 1, 2019.  Referred to as vehicle warning sounds, the sound will be automatically activated when a car travels at speeds below 18.6 miles per hour.

Electric and hybrid cars are noticeably quieter than cars powered by an internal combustion engine.  This fact drew the attention of advocates for the blind and visually impaired a decade ago, ultimately leading to the passage of the Pedestrian Safety Enhancement Act (PSEA) of 2010.  The PSEA is intended to reduce the risk of harm to blind and visually impaired pedestrians, as well as cyclists, or anyone unable to hear the very quiet approach of these cars, by requiring electric and hybrid cars to emit a minimum added sound.  The issue regarding this requirement is complex and contentious, and it has generated a lot of research and extended discourse both for and against added sound.  Many electric and hybrid cars have used added sound for years; samples of some sounds can be found online.

A significant concern is that some automakers see the need to comply with the rule as an opportunity to invent branded sounds, while critics of branded sounds would prefer sounds as similar as possible to a vehicle engine, noting that discordant or unusual sounds could actually create confusion.  In addition, environmental advocates and soundscape preservationists have expressed concern about adding more noise to an overburdened soundscape.

One problem with reaching a sensible solution is that the instructional videos produced by industry tend to show cars and pedestrians interacting in open spaces, but real world experiences are more likely to occur in busy parking lots or residential streets.  Measures such as traffic calming and slow zones could result in a growing number of areas where driving below 20 miles per hour would be the norm in order to improve safety for pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers.  One thing is clear, vehicle engineers must incorporate these details into the planning of current and future warning sounds.

Asked about branded sound design, Jeanine Botta, who runs the Green Car Integrity Project blog, said that she hopes sound designers will follow the rule’s requirement that sound be recognizable as a motor vehicle in operation, and let go of branding concepts.  “Our attention is already stretched to its maximum potential.  No pedestrian – or cyclist or motorist – should have to quickly process and interpret any sound, especially one intended for safety.  If a sound is the least bit discordant, it runs the risk of being misinterpreted and ignored.”

Automotive product developers considering new and improved added quiet car sound should include industry outsiders in the research and development process.  Consultation with environmental psychologists, environmental health researchers, acoustic ecologists, and soundscape preservationists would be a step in the right direction.