Tag Archive: hear

What do ducks hear, and why we should care

Photo credit: Magda Ehlers from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

My focus is on human hearing and especially on finding a quiet restaurant in which to enjoy the meal and the conversation with my wife, but as a noise activist I learned about the adverse impacts of noise on animals, including birds and small mammals and fish and marine mammals.

This report in The New York Times looks at what ducks hear.

Why should we care? Because we should care about all living things on the face of the earth and in its waters.

And they all evolved in quiet.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Travel with your ears

Photo credit: Adrian Glover licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5

The New York Times Magazine has produced a slick and interesting piece where they travel around the world to various locations and focus on what you would hear if you were there. In the piece we hear the sounds of lava flowing from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, then travel to northern Chile to hear the cracking of the Atacama Desert, stop briefly to hear the sound of rats conversing in New York City, and so on.

Sit back, relax, and click the link above.

If you are interested in personal sound control, check out

Nuheara’s IQbuds

this Fast Company review of Nuheara’s IQbuds. Sean Captain reviews Nuheara’s IQbuds, another player in the personal sound control market. Captain states that he has good hearing, but finds stepping into a loud bar or restaurant disconcerting.  Says Captain, “[n]ot only does the noise frazzle my nerves, I get exhausted trying to discern voices from background clatter.”  Oh, we understand.

Enter Nuheara’s IQbuds, a new class of smart Bluetooth wireless earbuds priced at $299 a pair, that allows users to control their immediate soundscape. So, how do the IQbuds work?  Captain writes:

Equipped with built-in microphones, the IQbuds process ambient audio in real time before feeding it to your ears. That allows you to customize how you hear, such as muting background noise, boosting the voices of people you’re talking to, or layering streaming music with ambient sounds so that both come through clearly.

While Captain notes that the sound quality isn’t quite there yet, his test run of the IQbuds in a loud restaurant convinces him of their value.  Captain writes that “[n]o matter what Cannington (Nuheara’s co-founder) sounds like through the IQbuds, it’s so much better than straining to hear him without them.”

Click this link to read Captain’s review of Doppler Lab’s HERE One, a competing earbud manufactured by Nuheara’s “well-funded rival.”  Reading both reviews, it’s clear that there is room for improvement, but with each iteration HERE One and IQbuds have and should continue to get better, more intuitive, and easier to use.  It’s an exciting product for people who find it increasingly difficult to navigate noisy environments, and may offer some reasonable self-help to people with hearing loss who can’t afford hearing aids.

Once you teach a computer to see,

Shhhh.  It can hear you.

Shhhh. It can hear you.

it can teach itself to hear.  MIT’s computer science department, “using software image-recognition to automate sound recognition,” found that “once software can use video analysis to decide what’s going on in a clip, it can then use that understanding to label the sounds in the clip, and thus accumulate a model for understanding sound, without a human having to label videos first for training purposes.”  And humans are rendered even more useless than before.

Link via @BoingBoing.

A tragic case of misophonia

woman-pic

She could hear everything, and it cost her her life.  Joyce Cohen writes about Dr. Michelle Lamarche Marrese, a “beautiful and brilliant, a Russian historian with several advanced degrees and the author of an acclaimed academic book on women’s property rights,” who committed suicide this past October.  Friends assumed her suicide was due to depression over her “unraveling marriage,” by Cohen knew the actual reason behind Marrese’s untimely death: “it was her hidden battle with misophonia — or ‘selective sound sensitivity syndrome.’”  How did Cohen know this?  Because Marrese emailed her “desperately seeking advice after [Cohen] wrote a story on the mysterious condition for the New York Times,” and they “corresponded extensively.”

Click the link to read more about misophonia and Marrese’s battle with the disease.

Thanks to Charles Shamoon for the link.