Tag Archive: hearing aid

Scientists discover that eardrums move in sync with eyes

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Aylin Woodward, New Scientist, reports on new research that shows that our eardrums appear to move to shift our hearing in the same direction that our eyes are looking. Jennifer Groh, the lead researcher, believes “that before actual eye movement occurs, the brain sends a signal to the ear to say ‘I have commanded the eyes to move 12 degrees to the right’.” Why? She opines that “[t]he eardrum movements that follow the change in focus may prepare our ears to hear sounds from a particular direction,” noting that one reason why the eyes and ears move together may be to help “the brain make sense of what we see and hear.”

My guess is that for our primate ancestors, and then for primitive humans, there was a survival advantage to hearing sound from something that had been seen. Friend or foe? Food or predator? It will be interesting to see where this research leads, particularly as Woodward writes that the study might help develop better hearing aids, “which must locate where sounds are coming from to work well.”

Research is always good. That’s how we learn about how the world works. But we don’t need any more research to know that noise is a health and public health hazard, and that we need to press our elected officials to make the world quieter now.

Because no matter how good the technology becomes, preserved normal hearing is far better than any hearing aid. And far cheaper, too.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

iBuds? Apple shows its hand in the “hearables” space

Photo credit: Bjorn Knetsch licensed under CC BY 2.0

By David Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This recent piece by Steven Levy in Wired suggests what Apple (and others) are up to in the hearables market. Levy tells us that Apple is collaborating with Cochlear to provide solutions for people with profound hearing loss. This should excite anyone concerned about the epidemic of hearing loss in America, because it suggests that hearing health has gained enough attention that corporate America is applying resources to the problem and turning it into a “technological opportunity.”

If you’ve been following outcomes from the two federal reports last year (from the Presidents Council of Advisers on Science and Technology, and the National Academy of Medicine) and the resulting bi-partisan Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 (OCHA) approved by the Senate last week (earlier approved by the House), you know something’s up in the hearing health sector. And with the passage of OCHA last week, hearing health, an issue that has languished in the shadows for lack of funding for over three decades is suddenly center-stage again after three decades of neglect.

The Wired article, coupled with the legislative success in the Senate, demonstrate that hearing health is finally starting to get the attention it deserves. That Apple is trying to gain a foothold in this world shows that tech companies smell an opportunity. And the passage of OCHA clearly establishes that hearing loss is a nonpartisan issue important to both republicans and democrats, because despite the state of affairs in DC today it’s an issue on which the nation can begin to make progress even if the rest of the legislative agenda is on hold!

David Sykes chairs/co-chairs four national professional groups in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, ANSI S12 WG44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group. He is also a board member of the American Tinnitus Association, co-founder of the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), and a contributor to “Technology for a Quieter America” (2011, National Academy of Engineering). A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

T-coil makes the world more accessible for the hearing impaired

Terry Byrne, The Boston Globe, writes about how the New Repertory Theatre is helping the hearing impaired enjoy the theater.  Byrne reports that the New Repertory Theatre installed a new assistive listening system before the start of the fall season that uses a hearing induction loop that “directly and wirelessly receives amplified sound from the stage without background noise.”  Audience members with hearing aids or cochlear implants that have T-coil receivers can “simply press a button on their hearing aid to take advantage of the theater’s system.”

Kayla C. Leed, Mountain Xpress, reporting on a presentation by Juliette Sterkens, national hearing loop advocate for the nonprofit Hearing Loss Association of America, writes:

A hearing loop is a wire that circles a room and is connected to a sound system. The loop transmits the sound electromagnetically, and its signal is then picked up by the telecoil in the hearing aid or cochlear implant.”

Hearing loops are becoming more popular in the U.S., Sterkens pointed out. They’re available in airports, train stations, places of worship, stadiums, auditoriums, grocery store cash registers and libraries. New York City subway stations and taxis are required to have hearing loops installed.

Do you or someone you know have a hearing aid or cochlear implant with a T-coil receiver?  Download this loop finder app to help find nearby loop-enabled venues.

Thanks to Charles Shamoon for the links.