Tag Archive: Hearing Health Magazine

Japanese residents living near U.S. air base compensated for noise

Photo credit: Hideyuki KAMON licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report in the Japan Times covers legal proceedings about a court case in Japan, where residents living near the Iwakuni Air Base are subject to noise from military jets. The Hiroshima High Court upheld a prior ruling, raising the damage award to 735 million yen (approx. $6,795,810).

We hope there will be similar legal cases in the U.S., but we hope even more that quieter jet engines will be required for all airplanes and flight paths will be adjusted to minimize noise exposure for those living near airports.

Thanks to Yishane Lee, editor of Hearing Health magazine, a publication of the Hearing Health Foundation, for informing us of this article.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

We’ve asked this very question many times

Photo credit: Philip Robertson

Why are (some) sports so noisy? Kathi Mestayer, Hearing Health Magazine, asks that question in her thoughtful article about sports and noise. At Silencity we have expressed concern with the ongoing display of bravado between NFL teams over which team’s fans can produce the loudest crowd roar, and noted with despair that this inane and dangerous contest has been embraced by college sports.  But as Mestayer notes in her article, noise in sports is not limited to popular team sports.  As anyone looking to get fit at the local gym knows, we are often exposed to excruciatingly loud music as part of the gym “experience.”

Mestayer writes that “[v]olumes in fitness classes hae been measured at above 100 dBA,” which, according to a handy graphic accompanying the article, can cause hearing damage after 14 minutes of exposure (if not before).  So why is it so loud?  Because “[b]ackground music is used to set the pace (and vary it), keep people moving, and make the workout seem more energetic and fun.”  Except when it isn’t.  Mestayer interviews Bonnie Schnitta, an acoustics consultant, who tells her about an acoustical retrofit for a gym because of noise complaints. The problem was due to design decisions, because, said Schnitta, “[p]eople often aren’t thinking about noise during the design phase.”

So what can we do?  Mestayer gives us some options, including using earplugs and downloading the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health’s sound meter, but one thing is clear–until and unless the government mandates noise standards for the public in public spaces, you have to protect yourself.

Click the first link to read Mestayer’s article in full.  It’s well worth your time.