Tag Archive: hearing loss

The best headphones for children? None!

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This post on the Parentology.com site discusses the best headphones for children in 2019. I disagree strongly. The best headphones for children are none at all! Why? Two reasons, one for auditory health and one for the child’s social and intellectual development.

First, for auditory health, headphones using the industrial-strength 85 decibel noise exposure level as a “safe” volume limit for a child’s tender ears isn’t safe. The UK’s Advertising Standards Authority ruled again Amazon advertising these headphones as safe for hearing because they’re not.

Second, allowing a child to isolate him or herself with headphones, first while watching a video on a device and then when listening to music when older, doesn’t allow the child to interact or communicate with others. And for the older children, the parent has no idea what the children are listening to.

Audiologists already report seeing younger patients with hearing loss and tinnitus instead of the senior population they are used to caring for.

And an epidemic of noise-induced hearing loss and other auditory problems appears to be certain in the near future.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The impact of hearing loss

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

I usually don’t listen to podcasts or watch documentaries–they take too much time to transmit the information that I can read in a fraction of the time–but this discussion of the impact hearing loss by Michael Wilkes, MD, isn’t available in a print version.

I heard the tail end of Dr. Wilkes’ weekly radio segment in the car, and looked online to find the rest.

It clocks in at under 4 minutes, and it’s well worth listening to.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Consumer Reports continues to focus on noise and health

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Consumer Reports continues to cover issues of noise and health, which is a good thing. The only problem with this Consumer Reports article is that falls into a common trap and cites the occupational recommended exposure level of 85 A-weighted decibels for application to the public. This is a misuse of the occupational exposure recommendation that is sadly all too common.

Noise is different from other occupational exposures, e.g., ionizing radiation or toxic solvents, because exposure continues outside the workplace, all day long, all year long, for an entire lifetime.

In 1974, the Environmental Protection Agency adjusted the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended exposure level for the additional exposure time–24 hours a day instead of 8 hours a day at work, 365 days a year instead of 240 days in the factory, to calculate that the safe noise exposure level to prevent hearing loss was a time-weighted average of only 70 decibels.

The EPA did not adjust for lifetime exposure, probably because in 1974 the life expectancy of a man was only 67 years.  But with people living on average to near 80, the additional years of noise exposure may account for the very high prevalence of hearing loss in older people.

The NIOSH Science Blog post on February 8, 2016, covered this topic, and I wrote about it in the American Journal of Public Health in 2017. In a requested blog post, I explained additional reasons why the real safe noise exposure level to prevent hearing loss has to be lower than 70 decibels.

I recently had this insight: the World Health Organization recommends only one hour of 85 A-weighted decibel noise exposure daily because after only one hour it is impossible for the listener to achieve the only evidence-based safe noise level to prevent hearing loss, which is the EPA’s 70 dB daily noise dose.  An occupational noise calculator shows this calculation. So, 85 decibels isn’t safe for workers’ hearing, and it certainly isn’t safe for the public.

Our ears are like our knees–we only have two of them–but unlike knees, our ears can’t be replaced. So protect what you have and remember: it is sounds too loud, it IS too loud!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Does chocolate prevent hearing loss?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This story in the Daily Mail says that chocolate may help prevent hearing loss, due to chemicals called polyphenols in chocolate. I’m not going to waste any time tracking down the original scientific article.

Over the last few decades, powerful computers and better statistical methods have made it easy–in the opinion of many scientists, too easy–to sort through large amounts of data to find interesting correlations or associations that in many cases are only random, even if they meet statistical significance and have some theoretical basis to explain why the association may be a causative one. I would put this “study” in that category.  Junk science about junk food.

I know that many people think chocolate is a health food, but too much chocolate will cause obesity, diabetes, and dental caries.

And to prevent hearing loss, why not just avoid loud noise or use hearing protection if you can’t avoid the noise. Because that’s actually safe and effective.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Another one bites the dust

Photo credit: rufus licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from Newsday discusses rocker Mark McGrath’s hearing loss. Unfortunately, he joins many other rock musicians who report hearing loss in mid-to-late life after years of noise exposure.

Noise-induced hearing loss is an occupational hazard for musicians, especially those who play popular music, but it is entirely preventable. A musician can’t avoid loud music, but use of earplugs can prevent or at least reduce hearing injury.

Because if it sounds too loud, it is too loud!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Will kids face an epidemic of hearing loss?

Photo credit: Jonas Mohamadi from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This interview of U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams and FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb discusses an unprecedented epidemic of vaping among teens. According to the FDA Commissioner and the Surgeon General, the epidemic caught public health authorities by surprise.

Use of personal music players, with associated headphones or earbuds, is also very common among teens. About 90% of teens have a personal music player of one sort or another. An article last year reported found auditory damage among 14% of Dutch schoolchildren age 9-11 who used personal music players. One might call this an epidemic of personal music player use.

It takes about 40 years of noise exposure for noise-induced hearing loss to become clinically apparent, so when today’s young people are in their 40s to 50s, they will likely be as hard of hearing as today’s people in their 60s, 70s, and 80s.

Since 2015, I have been trying to get those federal agencies responsible for protecting the public–the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Federal Trade Commission’s Division of Advertising Practices, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission–to take action to protect young people’s hearing. I’ve also communicated with the American Academy of Pediatrics, which educates parents about the dangers of sun exposure and tobacco smoke, but not about noise.

I’m going to add the Surgeon General to my list. A predecessor issued a Call to Action about skin cancer, but no one has said anything about noise in more than 50 years.

So far my appeals have largely been ignored.

So the question is this: Will there be an unprecedented epidemic of hearing loss in children and teens when they get older? And will those charged with protecting Americans’ health remember that they were warned?

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Bikers at risk of profound hearing loss

Photo credit: ajay bhargav GUDURU from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

According to this article by Matt Colley for the British Motorcyclists Federation, bikers are making themselves deaf. Not exactly surprising, but the cause of the hearing loss isn’t just from riding loud motorcycles, it’s from exposure to wind noise.

Colley states that “[w]hen riding at 62mph, 95dB of noise turbulence is generated by the airflow within your helmet.” 95 decibels is more than enough to cause permanent hearing loss. The article continues, adding that “even at standards speeds, exposure to wind noise can have significant consequences.” So what happens if a motorcyclist goes faster? “Unsurprisingly, the faster you go the higher the noise level and consequently the higher level of risk,” says Colley, adding that at 74mph the turbulence ratchets “up to 98dB, which can be damaging after only seven minutes of exposure.”

Ironic isn’t it? People ride big, loud motorcycles because they love the sense of freedom and power and yes—they like being noticed. Meanwhile, motorcycle manufacturers–even Harley Davidson–are already developing quiet, battery-powered bikes. But a quiet, electric motorcycle, while clearly an improvement for helpless bystanders, won’t solve the wind-noise problem that the British Motorcycle Federation says is the real cause of hearing loss among motorcycle riders.

As Colley notes, it’s important for riders to hear sounds that are necessary for situational awareness, like horns and sirens. He adds that wind noise causes fatique, requiring rider to concentrate more. So what does he suggest? Something we at The Quiet Coalition have recommended since our inception–always use ear protection when you are exposed to loud noise.

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

Hidden hearing loss

Photo credit: Daria Shevtsova from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Hidden hearing loss is the term used to describe nerve damage in the inner ear (cochlear synatptopathy) which causes hearing loss detected only by special research techniques, not by standard hearing testing (pure tone audiometry). That’s why it’s called “hidden.” The clinical manifestation of hidden hearing loss is thought to be difficulty understanding speech in a noisy environment, but auditory training might help improve understanding of speech in noisy places.

This article describes a survey of adults who were asked if they would be willing to participate in auditory training. What’s of interest to me is that 22% of adults surveyed report having difficulty understanding speech in a noisy environment. That fits with other reports I’ve seen, but I think it’s an underestimate.

Many people with hearing loss think their hearing is excellent, and I think the same is true for people asked about difficulty understanding speech in a noisy environment. Due to the stigma of hearing loss, no one wants to admit that he or she has a problem.

More importantly, if people have difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments, it would seem to be much easier to make those environments quieter, rather than offering auditory training to those with the problem.

Quieter environments would make it easier for everyone to converse, and would prevent auditory damage in those without it.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

More evidence that headphone use causes hearing loss

Photo credit: Patrick Pielarski licensed under CC by 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This isn’t a scientific study, but a news report from Ireland. An audiologist recommends that parents limit children’s headphone use to one hour daily. She notes that, “ten years ago, around 5pc of people aged under 45 were fitted with hearing aids. Now, 23pc of our hearing aids are for people under 45.”

That’s a shame. Hearing aids are costly, and even the best are a poor substitute for preserved natural hearing. It takes decades for noise-induced hearing loss to become bad enough that people are willing to use hearing aids.

A Dutch study earlier this year found auditory damage from headphone use in children age 9-11, and the damage only gets worse over time.

Parents–and indeed everyone–should limit headphone use, or better yet just put the headphones in the drawer.

One doesn’t need a continuous audio track to life! But if you do, for your own sake, for your ears, please turn down the volume.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Should doctors screen middle-aged and older adults for hearing loss?

Photo credit: Flávia Costa licensed under CC BY 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition received an email from contacts at the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is again looking at whether it should recommend screening for hearing loss. The last time it did this, USPSTF didn’t recommend screening for hearing loss in adults because no benefit had been shown from screening. The email reads:

Dear Hearing and Health Partners,

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has shared their Draft Research Plan for Hearing Loss in Older Adults: Screening on their website here. The draft plan also includes a graphic of a Proposed Analytic Framework and a Proposed Research Approach to identify the study characteristics and criteria that the Evidence-based Practice Center will use to search for publications for their evidence review.

According to the Task Force, The final Research Plan will be used to guide a systematic review of the evidence by researchers at an Evidence-based Practice Center. The resulting Evidence Review will form the basis of the Task Force Recommendation Statement on this topic. There is an opportunity for public comment on this draft until December 12, 2018. The draft research plan is available on the Task Force’s website here.

Cordially,

NCEH Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Program

There is important new research available that led to the USPSTF re-evaluating its recommendation. Several researchers have shown that most Americans get too much noise every day. The CDC reported that about 25% of American adults age 20-69 had noise-induced hearing loss, many without occupational noise exposure, and many thinking that their hearing was excellent.

Also, newer research shows that hearing loss is not a benign condition. It is correlated in stepwise fashion (i.e., more hearing loss, more problems) with social isolation, depression, falls, accidents, and dementia, all of which in turn are associated with increased mortality in older Americans.

And even more recent research shows that providing older people with hearing aids delays the onset of dementia, all of which compels the conclusion that doctors should absolutely screen their middle-aged and above patients for hearing loss.

If you have any thoughts about screening for hearing loss, send a comment to the USPSTF. I will!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.