Tag Archive: hearing loss

New study shows hope for hearing loss. Again.

Image credit: Chittka L. Brockmann licensed under CC BY 2.5

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report shows hope for hearing loss, describing a technique that may work to deliver drugs to inner ear structures deep within the skull, perhaps to treat hearing loss.

Whether these techniques will actually work, will be approved by the FDA, and will be affordable remains to be seen, probably years or even decades in the future.

In the meantime, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound–or several pounds–worth of cure.

Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Avoid loud noise and avoid hearing loss.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud. If you can’t carry on a normal conversation without straining to speak or to be heard, the ambient noise is above the auditory injury threshold of 75 A-weighted decibels, and your hearing is being damaged.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Can bananas protect against hearing loss?

Photo credit: Dom J from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Can bananas protect against hearing loss?

This report from Australia states that nutrients in bananas–zinc and potassium–can help protect hearing.

The potassium reportedly protects against hearing loss and the zinc against tinnitus.

That may be true and everyone should eat a healthy diet including at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily, but I doubt that these two nutrients by themselves will prevent auditory damage from noise exposure.

And I’m always puzzled that researchers and the public look for various cures or treatments for auditory disorders- many of questionable scientific validity or still in a very preliminary stage of development- when there is one proven effective way to protect hearing:

Avoid loud noise, or wear hearing protection if you can’t escape the noise.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Hearing loss is associated with accidental injury

Photo credit: slgckgc licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This paper in the March 22, 2018, issue of JAMA Otolaryngology reports that difficulty hearing is associated with an increased risk of accidental injury. The study is preliminary because it relies on subject self-report of hearing difficulty rather than measured hearing loss, but it makes sense. Sound provides much information–for communication, for entertainment, and for warning of hazards–and if you have difficulty hearing, you’ll become aware of problems (e.g., an approaching vehicle, a power tool that’s getting stuck, or even just a shouted warning) later than if you had good hearing.

Think about all the accidental injury that could be avoided if people made an effort to protect their hearing.  After all, most hearing loss in adults is noise-induced hearing loss which is 100% preventable.

Protect your hearing by avoiding loud noise or using hearing protection, and avoid accidental injury, too.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Turn that down! We can prevent hearing loss

Photo credit: Anthony from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Dr. Vic Snyder, a former congressman from Arkansas who is now a medical director at the Blue Cross/Blue Shield affiliate there, has it exactly right: hearing loss (and tinnitus) can be prevented by turning down the volume, walking away from noise sources, and using hearing protection.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

A wave of hearing loss in young people is being predicted

and the cause of this epidemic, says Teresa Cowie, Radio New Zealand, is damaging levels of sound from personal audio devices and noisy venues, like nightclubs. Will it really be an epidemic? Cowie cites the World Health Organization, which puts the number of at risk teenagers and young adults at more than a billion. Who are these at-risk young people? Mostly 12-to-35 years olds in well off countries who listen to unsafe levels of sound on their personal audio devices and smart phones.

So how does the WHO and other health organizations know that an epidemic is on the way? Cowie interviewed Peter Thorne, an audiology professor at Auckland University, who said “[t]here are some studies where younger people coming into the workforce, areas where they might take audiograms or do hearing tests – like the military for example – and those studies have shown a proportion of youth coming in with hearing losses.”

Thorne notes that the rules for limits on sound volume are voluntary for the manufacturers of personal audio devices, but the WHO is “currently review regulations around the volume levels devices should be allowed to reach.”

Let’s hope that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other government agencies join in the effort to regulate the sound levels on these devices. Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable, after all, and given that there is no effective treatment or cure for hearing loss, anything less than a robust response would be criminal.

 

 

Loud music can damage classical musicians’ hearing, too

Photo credit: Derek Gleeson licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

When we think of music damaging the ears, we think of rock musicians, many of whom unfortunately have noise-induced hearing loss or tinnitus, or of young people going to clubs or rock concerts. We don’t think of classical musicians.

But loud noise doesn’t discriminate–it can damage anyone’s ears, including workers, hunters, and yes, even a professional viola player.

These two reports describe an ongoing legal case in London, where a viola player has sued the Royal Opera House for damage he claims occurred during a Wagner performance, despite wearing ear plugs.

The Royal Opera House is claiming that such damage isn’t possible, and that it isn’t responsible, but I would disagree. It’s hard to study the effects of intermittent or impulsive noise exposure even in the occupational setting, but several facts are well-established:

  1. extremely loud sound can cause mechanical disruption to structures in the inner ear;
  2. there are marked variations in individual sensitivities to noise damage, which are not well understood; and
  3. many people do not get sufficient protection from ear plugs due to poor fit or improper use, even with instruction and practice.

The resolution of this case is not up to us but within the purview of the court.

But the lesson we can all learn is that “if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.”

And if noise is bothersome, that’s the signal to leave immediately, before your ears are damaged. After all, unlike knees or hips, they can’t be replaced.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

New Yorker writer worries about her ears–you should be worried, too

Photo credit: Scott Robinson licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

New Yorker staff writer Amanda Petrusich is worried about what noise is doing to her ears.

She’s right to be worried. We all should be worried.

As the world has gotten louder–perhaps because “everyone knows” that 85 decibels is safe because the National Institute for Deafness and Other Communication Disorders tells us “long or repeated exposure to sound at or above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss”–a vast uncontrolled experiment is taking place in the U.S., with 320 million subjects.

Gregory Flamme and colleagues showed that 70% of adults in Kalamazoo County, Michigan got total daily noise doses exceeding Environmental Protection safe noise levels for preventing hearing loss.

Not surprisingly, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control reported a year ago that 25% of American adults have noise-induced hearing loss, including many people without any occupational noise exposure.

Remember, if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud! If you can’t carry on a normal conversation without straining to speak or to be heard, the ambient noise is above 75 A-weighted decibels, which also happens to be the auditory injury threshold.

Your ears are like your eyes or your knees. You only have two of them. Keep them away from loud noise and they should last you your entire life.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise is causing hearing loss in traffic police in India

Photo credit: GPS licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from the Indian city of Pune documents hearing loss in traffic police. Apparently car horns are the main culprit. So how bad could it be?  This bad:

A study of 46 traffic personnel “found that 39 of the 46 traffic personnel could not pick up high frequency tones, indicating alarmingly high (83%) presence of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among the city’s traffic police.”

And the damage isn’t limited to hearing loss, as “the traffic personnel were also screened for hypertension,” and “13 of the 46 traffic personnel have been diagnosed with hypertension, a condition they were unaware about.

I have traveled in India, although not to Pune, and it is a noisy country. The big cities–Mumbai and Delhi–are noisier than New York City, so this report isn’t a surprise to me.

But there’s no reason to believe that ears in India are different from ears in the U.S. Traffic noise causes hearing loss and other health problems in the U.S., too.

Perhaps India–and the U.S.–should follow Kathmandu’s successful effort at eradicating traffic noise, because it can be done if the political will exists.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

London Underground noise could damage hearing

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Anyone who has ever taken the Underground (the subway, also known colloquially as the Tube) in London, as I have, knows that the trains there are noisy. Some lines date back to Victorian times, and on many lines the cars are decades old.

This report from the BBC documents how loud–greater than 105 decibels on many lines.

Transport for London, the quasi-governmental agency operating the Underground, downplays the risk. London Underground’s Nigel Holness said it monitored noise levels on the network and was investigating other ideas to “further reduce noise.” He added that, “[w]hile customers travelling on our network can experience noise, higher volumes tend to be for short periods of time and Health & Safety Executive guidance on noise suggests it is highly unlikely to cause any long-term damage to customers’ hearing.”

I would disagree.

The United Kingdom’s Health and Safety Executive, its equivalent of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, offers a “Noise Exposure Daily Reckoner” that allows workers, or in this case commuters using the Underground, to calculate their daily noise doses. Only 15 minutes at 105 decibels gives the exposed person a total daily noise dose of 90 decibels. That’s enough noise exposure to cause hearing loss over time. Those who spend an hour a day get the equivalent of a total daily noise dose of 96 decibels, which for sure will cause noise-induced hearing loss over time.

Many London commuters probably spend that much time each day in the Underground and in other trains or buses, maybe even more for those with long commutes.

And even strict adherence to recommended occupational noise exposure levels doesn’t protect all exposed workers from hearing loss.

Noise is different from other occupational exposures, e.g., ionizing radiation or toxic solvents, in that exposure continues outside work, all day long, all year long, for an entire life. I haven’t found a similar study for the UK, but Flamme et al. in the U.S. showed that 70% of adults in quiet Kalamazoo County, Michigan–where there is no Underground and the Subway is a fast-food restaurant chain–received total daily noise doses in excess of Environmental Protection Agency safe noise exposure levels. There is no reason to think that London is any quieter. I know from my personal observations in London, and from following reports from Pipedown about too-loud background music in the UK and from Action on Hearing Loss’s campaign for quieter restaurants, that noise exposure is certainly a problem there.

As Transport for London might say, “Mind the gap.” But in this case, the gap is going to be in its riders’ hearing.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.